Summary of “I can go for that: how soft rock finally got cool”

It’s more than that: at some point during the 17 years that separate McDonald’s last album of original material from his latest, Wide Open, the wider world learned to stop worrying and love yacht rock, or soft rock, or whatever you want to call the super-smooth, R&B- and jazz-inflected music that he performed, first as a backing vocalist with Steely Dan, then as frontman of the Doobie Brothers, then as a solo artist.
It is music that is bigger now than at any time since its heyday, which by common consent stretched between 1976, when McDonald joined – and transformed the sound of – the Doobie Brothers, and 1983, when the faceless-but-virtuosic session musicians in Toto swept the board at the Grammys with the 3m-selling Toto IV. There was a small resurgence in the ecstasy-fuelled Balearic scene of late-80s Ibiza, keen on overturning what DJ and soft rock fan Matthew Hamilton calls “That kind of post-punk stranglehold on taste and what was credible”.
There are communities online where arguments rage about what does and doesn’t constitute yacht rock – are Steely Dan too acerbic, too New York, too perennially acclaimed to qualify? Are Fleetwood Mac sufficiently smooth and soulful? And there is an entire US radio station dedicated to “Smooth-sailing soft rock from the late 70s and early 80s – the kind of rock that doesn’t rock the boat!” There are new bands dedicated to painstakingly recreating the sound – London duo Young Gun Silver Fox, whose 2016 debut album West End Coast offers a succession of lushly beautiful homages – and old artists who have found their careers unexpectedly reactivated.
There is the AOR Disco website, where the aforementioned Hamilton has spent the last eight years posting an apparently inexhaustible supply of soft rock DJ mixes and re-edits, not all of which have been met with untrammelled delight by the genre’s diehard fans.
Initially at least, the resurgence of interest in soft rock did seem to come with a side order of irony.
The man who invented the term “Yacht rock”, US writer and actor JD Ryznar, is clearly a fan of the music – the podcast he currently co-presents runs a feature called “Yacht or nyacht”, which determines the suitability of records for inclusion within the genre – but the Yacht Rock web series he helped devise in 2005 was a parody, lampooning John Oates, McDonald and Kenny Loggins, among others, as preposterous figures.
On the most prosaic level, soft rock appeals to latterday producers because it is, as Daft Punk’s Thomas Bangalter has said, “The pinnacle of audio fidelity”.
Kirby has a theory that yacht rock was the sound of rock music entering its 30s. “What I found when researching the artists on Seafaring Strangers was that this was not their first foray into recorded music,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bad Internet Maps Are Created to Make You Crazy”

The post accompanying the map on Business Insider explained the crackpot methodology: The total number of restaurant check-ins on Foursquare divided by the number of a given chain’s restaurants in the state.
The map is bad, is my point, and obviously bad, and I sincerely wish that we didn’t have to talk about it.
Because maps like this one aren’t merely birdbrained schlock: They are a social media plague, a scourge that can reduce just about any social network to gibbering in-fights in the space of a few virally shared minutes.
A dumb internet map with incendiary falsehoods is coming for all of us, and there is just about nothing we can do to stop it.
To create an interesting map-i.e., a map with enough variance between states that we can all get mad online-publishers have to manipulate the data in ways that are doctored to the point of statistical uselessness.
A lack of academic rigor doesn’t seem to stop many publishers from producing-and, especially reproducing-these maps.
Consider how the Business Insider map spread. When Business Insider pulled down its tweet with the viral map a few hours after posting it, it seemed like a minor moral victory for fast food truthers: Twitter users successfully shamed a publisher out of a bad, silly post! But Business Insider confirmed to The Ringer that the deletion had nothing to do with the nonsense data set.
Are we supposed to believe that in the last 14 months, Americans abandoned McDonald’s for Chick-fil-A in droves? Wouldn’t that lead to some kind of greater McDonald’s crisis of the sort that might make just a little bit of news? Were the two maps generated with Foursquare built using different methodologies, and if so, how could both of them have yielded “The most popular fast food chain in every state”? Does Business Insider know that it published the other map? If it did, would anyone there care?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Forget Washington. Facebook’s Problems Abroad Are Far More Disturbing.”

Free Basics includes a limited suite of internet services, including Facebook, that can be used without counting toward a cellphone data plan.
As a result, the number of Facebook users in Myanmar has skyrocketed to more than 30 million today from 2 million in 2014.Photo.
“We work hard to educate people about our services, highlight tools to help them protect their accounts and promote digital literacy,” said Debbie Frost, a Facebook spokeswoman.
The speed of Facebook’s growth in the developing world has made it an especially potent force among first-time internet users, who may not be appropriately skeptical of what they see online.
Facebook’s community standards prohibit hate speech and threats, but many harmful viral posts – such as a WhatsApp thread in Southern India that spread false rumors about a government immunization campaign – are neither hateful nor directly threatening, and they wouldn’t be prohibited under Facebook’s community standards as long as they came from authentic accounts.
Facebook has argued that the benefits of providing internet access to international users will ultimately outweigh the costs.
People are dying, and communities are tearing themselves apart with the tools Facebook has built.
An article on Monday about abuses of Facebook’s services in various countries rendered incorrectly the name of a government-run telecom company in Myanmar.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘I could live simpler’: Floods and fires make Americans rethink their love affair with stuff”

Americans, even those outside the disaster zones, are starting conversations about how much stuff they have – and what they really need.
They contemplate reevaluating the mountains of stuff in their garages, attics and basements.
Watching people who have lost everything can prompt a spiritual change or a value shift, according to Marjorie Kukor, an Ohio psychologist who has been a mental-health volunteer for local and national disasters.
Still, Sgrott-Wheedleton calls the relationship of people with their stuff “Complex.” “I work with people who say they wish they could throw a match at their piles of stuff and let it all burn down and start fresh somewhere else. But do they really mean that?” she says.
“We hold on to stuff because of what we believe it says about us,” says Regina Lark, a professional organizer in Los Angeles.
“We will think more about what it is we are buying. Do we really need this? But I can also see going the opposite way and thinking you want more things to make up for what you lost. But I don’t want to do that. I would like to live a life with less stuff,” Krumenauer said.
The recent spate of hurricanes, earthquakes and fires means that “People, for good or bad, are having vicarious reactions to what they are seeing,” Nitza says.
This tragedy “Made us realize that whatever stuff we had can eventually be replaced,” Sarah Cocks says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Floyd Mayweather Helped Two Young Guys From Miami Get Rich”

Mr. Mayweather, who has promoted three different tokens – Centra, Stox and Hubiits – has even taken to calling himself Crypto Mayweather in social media posts, a play on his better-known nickname, Money Mayweather.
The story of Centra illustrates that beneath the signs of mainstream acceptance, coin offerings still exist in a legal gray zone with few checks on the ambitions of young entrepreneurs.
Making up for the inexperience of the young men was an older chief executive named Michael Edwards, at least according to the Centra website at the time.
The photo on Centra’s website was a photo of a Canadian physiology professor who had no relation to Centra – and none of the details on Mr. Edwards’s LinkedIn profile, like his work experience at Bank of America and Wells Fargo, checked out.
Centra charged past these hiccups and began its token sale, got its endorsement from Mr. Mayweather and moved ahead with its plans for a virtual currency debit card.
Mr. Trapani said Mr. Mayweather was so intrigued by Centra’s technology that he wanted to be paid in Centra tokens, and wanted to be a partner for future business ventures.
A spokeswoman for Mr. Mayweather, Kelly Swanson, said he had been paid in cash for the posts and was not involved in any continuing relationship with Centra.
After being contacted by The Times, Mr. Mayweather deleted his Instagram and Facebook posts endorsing Centra, though he left up a Twitter post.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 things to know about sleep as the clocks go back”

People across the UK will wake up having gained an hour’s sleep on Sunday morning, as the clocks go back heralding darker evenings and shorter days.
Short sleepers are generally defined as those who regularly get less than six hours’ sleep and long sleepers generally more than nine or 10 hours’ a night.
We do know that chronic sleep deprivation – that is, under-sleeping by an hour or two a night over a period of time – has been linked time and again by scientists to poor health outcomes: you don’t have to go for days without sleep to suffer these negative effects.
After deep sleep we go back to stage two for a few minutes, and then enter dream sleep, also called REM. As the name suggests, this is when dreaming happens.
In a full sleep cycle a person goes through all the stages of sleep from one to three, then back down to two briefly, before entering REM sleep.
Dr Ekirch uncovered more than 2,000 pieces of evidence in diaries, court records and literature which suggest people used to have a first sleep beginning shortly after dusk, followed by a waking period of a couple of hours, then a second sleep.
Sleep experts say teenagers need up to 10 hours sleep a night, but almost half don’t get this much according to the NHS. Bedrooms are supposed to be a place of rest but are increasingly filled with distractions like laptops and mobile phones, making it harder for young people to nod off.
Levels of melatonin, the hormone that tells our body to prepare for sleep, began rising earlier in the volunteers – their bodies were preparing for sleep much closer to sunset.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What not to order at restaurants”

INSIDER spoke with professional chefs to ask them what dishes they’d never order at a restaurant and why.
Gourmet burgers top the list as a “Waste of money and high-end ingredients.” Never order the seafood special, since there’s a good chance you’re eating fridge leftovers.
INSIDER spoke with several professional chefs to ask their opinion about the food you should never order in a restaurant and why.
“Chefs don’t typically appreciate well-done orders unless there is a very specific reason for the request,” James Briscione, Director of Culinary Research at the Institute of Culinary Education told INSIDER. “They typically reserve the least desirable cuts to cook well done. In general, less attention is given to well-done orders.”
“Never order anything with truffle oil as a listed ingredient,” chef Briscione said.
“I never order mussels at restaurants,” Mary Dumont, chef and owner of Cultivar in Boston, told INSIDER. “I know people love them and I’m meticulous about their storage and care if I serve them, but all it takes is one bad mussel and you’re down for the count.”
It’s tempting to order the wagyu beef burger topped with foie gras and duck-fat bacon, but hear us out.
“Specials are tricky in restaurants,” chef Silvia Barban said, executive chef at Aita and LaRina, told INSIDER. “It could be the most fresh and delicious special, but in some restaurants, specials are the way to clean up the fridge.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Math’s Beautiful Monsters”

Weierstrass had found a new way to deal with a fiendish class of equations known as Abelian functions.
In Germany, the great Bernhard Riemann told his students that he knew of a continuous function that had no smooth sections, and for which it was impossible to calculate the derivative of the function at any point.
The French mathematician Émile Picard pointed out that if Newton had known about such functions, he would have never created calculus.
At the Sorbonne, Charles Hermite wrote, “I turn with terror and horror from this lamentable scourge of functions with no derivatives.” Henri Poincaré-who was the first to call such functions monsters-denounced Weierstrass’ work as “An outrage against common sense.” He claimed the functions were an arrogant distraction, and of little use to the subject.
At the end of the 19th century, Swedish mathematician Helge von Koch had become interested in the idea of non-smooth functions, but he wanted to see their shape.
Koch had succeeded in extending Weierstrass’ monster beyond the world of equations and functions.
Many years later, it would become apparent that the Weierstrass function had the same property.
From fluid dynamics to finance, creatures like the Weierstrass function have challenged our ideas about the relationship between mathematics and the natural world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet The Badass Women Wrestlers Of Senegal”

ZIGUINCHOR, Senegal – It was lunchtime and 67-year-old great-grandmother Marie-Thérèse Sambou was recalling a childhood spent crisscrossing nearby villages to take part in wrestling matches.
Among the family members gathered around her – including nephews, nieces, and an old man gently extricating a thorn from a baby goat’s front leg – were two women who have each ranked among Africa’s top female wrestlers.
Eveline Diatta, 41, Marie-Thérèse’s daughter, was one of the first women wrestlers to represent Senegal internationally, and is currently head coach of the women’s team.
In most of Senegal, women are still forbidden to wrestle – partly because of conservative religious values, and partly because they’re banned from even witnessing some of the lavish mystical rites that surround the sport.
Male wrestlers at the top of the game receive corporate sponsorship, tens of thousands of dollars per fight, and the adulation of fans breathlessly following Senegal’s most popular sport.
For women, who are expected to give up wrestling once they’re married – and swiftly concentrate on having children – a fleeting chance to go professional comes in the form of a handful of local festivals.
Because the rules of laamb are similar to those that govern international freestyle wrestling, Coly felt many women would instinctively be able to make the leap.
Paradoxically, just as opportunities to wrestle beyond Casamance have flourished, fewer Jola women want to continue the sport.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Electric buses are coming, and they’re going to help fix 4 big urban problems”

The cost differential is still daunting – a BEB still costs $200 to $300 thousand more up front – but the cumulative advantages have grown to the point that dozens of cities are rushing to replace their fleets.
In other words, he thinks BEBs will hit an inflection point, growth will radically accelerate, and they will eat the urban transit market whole, in fairly short order.
Because capital costs are the biggest chunk of BEB lifecycle costs – remember, they cost $200,000 to $300,000 more than diesel buses up front – outside capital helps them the most.
As BEB tech advances, the market grows and big players jostle for advantage The bulk of the buzz in the BEB space is around California-based Proterra.
To date, Proterra has sold 400 BEBs to a variety of cities around the US, but it is rapidly ramping up manufacturing capacity, hoping to crank out 400 BEBs a year going forward.
Cities are going gaga for BEBs On Monday, representatives from a dozen global cities signed the Fossil-Fuel-Free Streets Declaration, which pledges them to purchasing only zero-emissions buses starting in 2025.
Albuquerque, New Mexico, is ordering 18 60-foot, articulated BEBs from BYD. Up in Canada, Edmonton will buy only BEBs beginning in 2020, while Montreal will poke its toe in the water with three.
As the industry scales up, costs come down, and the benefits of BEBs become visible to the urban public, more and more cities will board the bandwagon.

The orginal article.