Summary of “Jefferies gives IBM Watson a Wall Street reality check”

IBM Watson effectively operates as a consultancy where the company engages in high-value contracts with corporates to implement Watson technology for specific business cases.
IBM is struggling to bridge the gap between client needs and its own technological capability.
Jefferies pulls from an audit of a partnership between IBM Watson and MD Anderson as a case study for IBM’s broader problems scaling Watson.
MD Anderson cut its ties with IBM after wasting $60 million on a Watson project that was ultimately deemed, “Not ready for human investigational or clinical use.”
If job postings are any indication, IBM is not keeping pace with other technology companies in hiring machine learning developers.
The information provided in Jefferies’ report isn’t new nor groundbreaking, but it’s a strong signal that Wall Street is beginning to pay more close attention to the challenges facing IBM Watson.
I’ve listened to my fair share of IBM earnings calls and it’s clear the market has been focusing too heavily on short-run growth and not enough on long-term technological or strategic sustainability.
It seems perfectly reasonable that IBM shot out of the gates like a rocket in a mostly sterile AI market selling to CTOs and newly minted chief data officers with just enough anxiety to open check books.

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Summary of “LISTEN: 12 podcasts that explore the human side of tech”

As technology pervades every part of our lives, someone talking us through what it means can be a comfort.
Ben Thompson and James Allworth explore the effect of technology on society as a whole.
Two guys, 40 years of online experience, and a no-holds-barred discussion of how the internet is affecting our lives for good or bad. 3.
Practical advice and tips for being a happier and more productive human with help from technology from the team at Lifehacker.
Bloomberg Tech reporters uncover what’s happening behind the innovation that’s driving the economy.
A show for a better future: interviews with great minds in tech, philosophy and art.
Join Team Motherboard’s fast-paced look at new technology, culture and discoveries.

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Summary of “Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Oprah all use the 5-hour rule”

Over the past year, I’ve explored the personal history of many widely admired business leaders like Elon Musk, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Mark Zuckerberg to understand how they apply the principles of deliberate practice.
Many of these leaders, despite being extremely busy, set aside at least an hour a day over their entire career for activities that could be classified as deliberate practice or learning.
How the best leaders follow the 5-hour rule For the leaders I tracked, the five-hour rule often fell into three buckets: reading, reflection, and experimentation.
The power of the 5-hour rule: improvement rate People who apply the five-hour rule in the world of work have an advantage.
We should look at learning like we look at exercise We need to move beyond the cliche, “Life-long learning is good,” and think more deeply about what the minimum amount of learning the average person should do each day to have a sustainable and successful career.
Bottom line: The busiest, most successful people in the world find at least an hour to learn EVERY DAY. So can you!
Find the time for reading and learning even if you are really busy and overwhelmed.
Increase the results you receive from each hour of learning by using proven hacks that help you remember and apply what you learn.

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Summary of “The Louisiana Environmental Apocalypse Road Trip”

Perhaps it’s no surprise that Louisiana is ranked, according to different surveys, 47th in environmental quality, third in poverty, and 49th in education.
Are you still gushing about your latest trip to New Orleans for Jazz Fest Presented by Shell, or French Quarter Festival presented by Chevron? “New Orleans is the best,” one visitor recently wrote to me, “You are so smart to live there!” But how smart is it to allow children to attend school built on toxin-laced waste? How smart is it to allow a community’s cancer rates to shoot off the charts? Louisiana is rich in culture, spirit, and faith, yet what type of state knowingly poisons its own people? What type of country stands by and allows it to happen?
In my first story I’ll tour us through a land America should have never allowed to materialize-it’s what I’m calling the Louisiana Environmental Apocalypse Road Trip.
As the Trump administration chucks environmental science out the window, evaporates industry regulations, and cripples agencies charged with protecting the environment, this tale is relevant for all Americans, because the poisoning happening in Louisiana could happen in your state too-in fact, it is probably already happening.
A military facility in northern Louisiana called Camp Minden contained 18 million pounds of old explosives, much of which had been stored improperly by a military contractor, including gigantic 880-pound sacks of propellant left outdoors and exposed to the baking Louisiana sun.
Marylee Orr, director of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network and one of the General’s main allies brings us mugs of water.
In the 1970s, notoriously corrupt Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards invited, “All these industries to relocate to Louisiana,” Subra says.
So plantations become petrochemical plants to produce fuels and products we all use daily, yet rarely do we stop to consider that they are made in a place, and that place is a Louisiana community founded by freed slaves, and these communities are being poisoned, and now corporations that own the plants are buying up these communities and turning them into “Buffer zones.” Can we all put down our cocktails for just a moment, and think about that?

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Summary of “100 Best Comics And Graphic Novels”

Summer’s the time for comics – Marvel and DC blockbusters are in movie theaters, fans are preparing to descend on San Diego for its epic annual Comic-Con, and if nothing else, your friendly local comic store or library is there to provide an air-conditioned Fortress of Solitude where you can escape the steamy streets.
So it’s a perfect time for our super summer reader poll – a few months ago, we asked you to tell us all about your favorite comics and graphic novels.
We assembled an amazing team of critics and creators to help winnow down more than 7,000 nominations to this final list of 100 great comics for all ages and tastes, from early readers to adults-only.
This isn’t meant as a comprehensive list of the “Best” or “Most important” or “Most influential” comics, of course.
It’s a lot more personal and idiosyncratic than that, because we asked folks to name the comics they loved.
That means you’ll find enormously popular mainstays like Maus and Fun Home jostling for space alongside newer work that’s awaiting a wider audience.
So poke around to find old favorites – and discover some new ones.
Here are some quick links to make it easier for you to navigate: Fantasy and Science Fiction, Graphic Nonfiction, Graphic Novels, Manga, Series Comics, Superheroes, Web Comics, Newspaper Comics, All Ages and Last, but Not Least.

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Summary of “The Pop-Up Employer: Build a Team, Do the Job, Say Goodbye”

To the extent that temporary organizations replace permanent ones, they have the potential to add to the economic uncertainty that workers must increasingly contend with.
There is some evidence that the corporate world, which has spent decades outsourcing work to contractors and consulting firms, is embracing temporary organizations.
Business Talent Group teams frequently work on the kickoff of a new drug – devising the strategy for reaching out to patient groups, journalists, doctors and insurers – and help pry open new markets for existing drugs.
The organization chart could be altered as needed, generating new roles and new workers.
Dave Summa, who worked on a team that the Business Talent Group assembled to advise a major agribusiness company on which markets to compete in, said it fell to him to define the questions that needed answering and the mode of analysis, while a colleague oversaw teams of workers who produced specific plans.
Flash-like organizations tend to combine both workers and managers.
Even if high-skilled workers like project managers and web developers find they are well compensated on the open market, said Lawrence Katz, a Harvard economist, low-skilled workers tend to fare worse outside firms.
Mr. Bernstein concedes that the anxiety is legitimate, though he says platforms could eventually dampen insecurity by playing a role that companies have historically played: providing benefits, topping off earnings if workers’ freelance income is too low or too spotty, even allowing workers to organize.

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Summary of “Priscilla Chan is running one of the most ambitious philanthropies in the world”

Priscilla Chan remembers the moment she decided to become a doctor.
In the past 18 months, Chan has added a new job to her resume: She’s also in charge of what will likely be one of the most well-funded philanthropies in human history.
Chan is running the day-to-day operations of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, the philanthropic investment company she created with her husband in late 2015, announced along with the birth of their first daughter, Max.
Known more colloquially as CZI, the relatively new effort has an ambitious tagline: “Advancing human potential and promoting equal opportunity.” Practically, that means Chan and Zuckerberg are focused on improving industries like education, medicine and even the criminal justice system.
At 32, Chan is one of the youngest people to helm of one of the most ambitious and well-funded philanthropic organizations in the world.
While sources say Chan is not involved in making Facebook decisions, many believe Facebook, one of the 10 most valuable companies in the world, would not be what it is today without Chan’s often invisible influence on its founder.
Added Benchmark partner Matt Cohler, an early Facebook employee and close friend of Chan and Zuckerberg’s: “Mark, over the history of at least the last 13 years, has just made almost without exception an extraordinary series of decisions over and over and over again and just exercised incredible judgment. I think wanting Priscilla to be his partner showed as good judgment as anything he’s ever done.”
The big decisions at CZI are shared by Chan and Zuckerberg, but Chan has taken on much of the day-to-day responsibilities.

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Summary of “The New York Review of Books”

Liu Xiaobo, the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize laureate who was sentenced to eleven years for “Inciting subversion” of China’s government, and who died of liver cancer on Thursday, illustrates a different pattern.
Liu, born in 1955, was eleven when the schools closed, but he read books anyway, wherever he could find them.
In the 1980s, while still a graduate student in Chinese literature, he was already known as a “Black horse” for denouncing nearly every contemporary Chinese writer: the literary star Wang Meng was politically slippery; “Roots-seeking” writers like Han Shaogong were excessively romantic about the value of China’s traditions; even speak-for-the-people heroes like Liu Binyan were too ready to pin hopes on “Liberal” Communist leaders like Hu Yaobang.
A visit to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art had brought him an epiphany: no one had solved the spiritual question of “The incompleteness of the individual person.” Even China’s great modern writer Lu Xun, whose fiction was so good at revealing moral callousness, hypocrisy, superstition, and cruelty, could not, in Liu Xiaobo’s view, take the next step and “Struggle with the dark.” Lu Xun tried this, in his prose poems, but in the end backed off; he “Could not cope with the solitary terror of the grave” and “Failed to find any transcendental values to help him continue.”
After his release from Qincheng Prison in 1991, Liu was banned from publishing in China and fired from his teaching post at Beijing Normal University-even though students there had always loved his lectures.
Several of Liu’s colleagues were detained and interrogated, and had their computers confiscated, but only Liu was sent to prison.
In November 2008, when Chinese police learned that people were signing Charter 08, it was officially labeled an attempt to start a “Color revolution.” That made Liu Xiaobo a “Big one” who needed to be brought down.
It is unclear why, in the final weeks of his life, Liu agreed to drop his desire to remain in China despite his consistent rejection of the marginalization that exile inevitably brings; he may have wanted to use his last energies to help his long-suffering wife Liu Xia and her brother Liu Hui get out of China.

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Summary of “The Trojan Horse: How Marketers, Retailers, and Artists Conceal Their True Intents”

Offering the first chapter of a book for free to people who join an email list – Having read the chapter and received more emails which connect them to the author, people are more likely to buy the full book than they would have been if they had only seen an advert.
Once people fell for that initial Trojan Horse, Amazon offered them other products and gradually captured more and more of their online spending.
We can use Franklin’s technique as a Trojan Horse to gain the respect, friendship, and cooperation of other people.
Robert Greene also recommends a number of Trojan Horse-style tactics in The 48 Laws of Power, concealing true intentions within a facade and using specific behavior to achieve goals.
For a more immediate effect, you can try a sudden act of kindness and generosity that gets people to lower their defenses-the Trojan Horse strategy.
The book as a structure is the Trojan horse of art – it is not feared by average people.
It is about much more than that – a way of changing how people think.
We need to build our own Trojan horses, embedding our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell we need to make our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it.

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Summary of “How to Be Charming When Talking About Yourself”

It’s sometimes assumed that talking too much about ourselves is rude; and asking questions of others is polite and charming.
There are far better and worse ways of speaking about ourselves.
We end up charming when we dare to reveal our vulnerabilities to others.
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FURTHER READING. “Polite people have it instilled in them from an early age that they should not talk too much about themselves. A few comments aside, they should – to prove appealing – always ask the other about their lives or stick to impersonal topics found in newspapers, lest they be accused of that heinous charge: self-absorption.But this rule fails to distinguish between different ways of talking about oneself. There are, as well-mannered people sometimes forget, better and worse ways to share details of one’s life. It is not the amount that one talks that should determine the issue; only how one does so”.
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