Summary of “Before You Pay for Financial Advice, Read This Guide”

What kind of adviser should I work with?If you’re thinking about hiring a financial planner, read this primer first.
You’ll want to hire the type of financial adviser who promises to act as a fiduciary all of the time, with all of your money, which is a fancy way of saying that person must be loyal to you first.
You should ask your financial planner to sign a fiduciary pledge, a promise not to profit at your expense.
After your financial planner has signed the pledge, make sure to ask these 21 questions.
Certified financial planners, for example, must satisfy some of the more rigorous curriculum and experience requirements.
Chartered financial consultants undergo something similar.
How much advice do I need?If you want to get started saving – or make sure you’re on track to meet certain goals – you may want to pay a financial adviser for a financial plan.
If you want to buy life insurance, you might pay a financial planner, for example, for a couple of hours to analyze what’s appropriate for your situation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Investor Who Took On Uber, And Silicon Valley”

Kapor Klein decided to write an open letter to Uber – which she published with her husband – after a young woman shared an explosive account of sexual harassment at Uber headquarters.
“Go to Sequoia, go to Benchmark, go to Kleiner, go to Accel, go to Andreessen, go to Khosla,” she names the kings of much-storied Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, Calif. She’s sitting inside the Kapor Center for Social Impact – a name that spells out the intent of the place.
Kapor Klein and her husband bought this four-story building in central Oakland – what’s become the edge of Silicon Valley as tech expands beyond Cupertino, Mountain View and San Francisco – and it houses an investment arm, research and philanthropic projects.
Kapor Klein faults the investor class, which holds on to the myth of meritocracy, that they are the hyper-rational conduits of capital and it so just happens that white men are the most worthy.
Castro, who is based in Albany, N.Y., describes Kapor Klein as “Protective,” an early investor who tries to shoo away others who don’t share their values.
In some ways, Kapor Klein wants young people who grew up poor to channel Silicon Valley’s sense of entitlement – the idea that it’s OK to fail; that failure is necessary; and that one deserves support anyway.
Kapor Klein disagrees – and Uber’s monumental meltdown is arguably proof she was right.
Kapor Klein wants the world to understand: Yes, she spoke out when others would not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Fathers Leave Their Children”

The child is a chance to turn things around and live a disciplined life.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, black single fathers are more involved in their kids’ lives than white single fathers at this stage.
The key weakness is not the father’s bond to the child; it’s the parents’ bond with each other.
The fathers often retain a traditional and idealistic “Leave It to Beaver” view of marriage.
The father begins to perceive the mother as bossy, just another authority figure to be skirted.
Suddenly there’s a new guy living in the house, a man who resents the old one.
The good news, especially from the Edin-Nelson research, is that the so-called deadbeat dads want to succeed as fathers.
Mayor Rahm Emanuel, a vocal leader in this cause, had Green recite his poem “Something to Live For” at his inaugural in 2015, and this Sunday the two of them will be appearing together to honor role model fathers on the South Side.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Actions, not words, reveal our real values”

I told my old coach that I really want to make Muckwork happen.
What about people that want to learn a language, or create a business, but haven’t started yet? What about people that want to quit smoking, or quit their job, but haven’t been able to yet?
He said, “If they really wanted to do it, they would have done it. You’ve been talking about Muckwork since 2008, but never launched it. Looking at your actions, and knowing you, I’d say that you don’t really want to start another company. You actually prefer the simple life you have now, focused on learning, writing, and playing with your kid. You say you want to, but your actions reveal the truth.”
I had been fooling myself for years, telling myself I wanted to do this, but my actions prove otherwise.
Yes I want it a little bit, but I want something else more.
Now I’ve been sharing this thought with friends who talk about wanting something, but aren’t making it happen.
“Oh wow. That’s true.”). No matter what kind of stuff you tell the world, or tell yourself, your actions reveal your real values.
Start doing what you say you want, and see if it’s really true.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s Tim Cook on Donald Trump, the HomePod, and the Legacy of Steve Jobs”

You should have the courage to walk away and be honest with yourself when you do something wrong, that you shouldn’t be so married to your position and your pride that you can’t say, “I’m changing directions.” These kind of things, these guardrails, should be the basis for Apple a century from now.
Do you think people will pay $349? If you remember when the iPod was introduced, a lot of people said, “Why would anybody pay $399 for an MP3 player?” And when iPhone was announced, it was, “Is anybody gonna pay”-whatever it was at that time-“For an iPhone?” The iPad went through the same thing.
You’ll see things happening in enterprises where AR is ¬≠fundamental to what they’re doing.
You’re going to see some consumer things that are unbelievably cool.
The Mac is the development platform for iOS. The other thing that has changed is that the most ¬≠forward-thinking chief information officers and chief executives are saying, “The top thing is, let’s have happy and productive employees.” When you care about people’s happiness and productivity, you give them what brings out the best in them and their creativity.
We’re working with them on things that have American innovation in them and create a good number of jobs.
The second thing we did was say, “You know, we could prepare a curriculum instead of asking educators to come up with their own.” We provided one for elementary schools because we think coding should be a required language just like English is.
It’s about thinking through for the Apple user what thing will improve their lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Train Your Brain to Get What You Want in 60 Days”

Contrary to theory, which cannot get you very far in the end, people who have actually been “there” provide practical steps on what you need to do.
Why You Need To Know What You Want”This is a fundamental irony of most people’s lives.
Conversely, people who know what they want in life see the world differently.
Some notice people wearing band shirts, while others notice anything fitness related.
It’s what happens when you let other people dictate your direction and speed in life.
Before each article I wrote, I pray that the work I produce will be beyond my own capability; and I visualize my work reaching the people who need it.
Again, the advice you take and the people you emulate matters.
ConclusionWhen you know what you want, you notice opportunities most people aren’t aware of.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want More Time? Get Rid of The Easiest Way to Spend It”

After taking even a little time away from these platforms, whenever I check in I can’t help but see them as repositories for stray feelings, and energy that we don’t want to spend on anything consequential.
Essentially, I had removed the easiest way to spend time from a long list of possibilities, so that all that’s left are activities that require at least a little commitment and resolve.
I’m reading more, walking more, socializing more, and working without so much self-prodding.
“Notification gratification” isn’t all people get out of Facebook, of course-we do want to see our friends’ photos, and cute animal videos aren’t unwelcome once they’re playing in front of us.
There are increasingly more ads, and now they’ve begun to jumble up the feed chronologically, so that you see your friends’ posts from throughout the week-a picture from ten minutes ago, then one from six days ago, then one from eight hours ago, and so on.
Facebook bought Instagram in 2012 for a billion dollars.
I’ll use them to share things I think people will want to see, to get in touch with people when there are no better methods, to send and receive invitations to real-life events, and to see what people are up to when I consciously decide to see what people are up to.
In spite of all of Facebook and Twitter’s attempts to make it difficult, I’m going to use them like websites.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happened When I Woke Up at 4:30 for 30 Days”

I’m always excited to get up and get going on the first day of an assignment, even this one, so waking up wasn’t too bad. In fact, I woke up on my own at 4:14.
So does the daunting prospect of writing one magazine story at a time for the rest of my life.
I set them down when it’s time to start my “Real” day and pick them up again the next day.
So far I’ve stayed up beyond 9 p.m. exactly three times, and even with those early bedtimes, I often feel like a frazzled pile of goo.
This reinforces a thought I have been tinkering with since Day 4 or so, an idea that has been on the margins of my consciousness but I haven’t been able to put into words: I don’t need to get up at 4:30 a.m. to find time to do something that I always wanted to do but never had time for.
In order to be able to get up at 4:30 and be a functioning human, I’ve gone to bed at 8:30 p.m. almost every night, which means my wife and I haven’t spent as much time alone together as I’d like, by which I mean exactly what you think I mean.
I don’t need to get up at 4:30 a.m. to find time to do something that I always wanted to do but never had time for.
My 4:30 a.m. time still feels fresh.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Purpose of Life is to Be a Nobody”

It’s the voice that compares us to people that don’t matter, it’s the same voice that convinces us that we’re entitled to a comfortable and easy life, and it’s indeed this voice that has us chasing arbitrary measures of success.
We spend our time acquiring things we don’t want or need, we falter at the first sign of hardship and inconvenience, and one day, we wake up to a ticking clock realizing that, all this time, we’ve lived somebody else’s life.
It leads to a kind of paralysis that steals the potential of experiencing some of the great joys in life.
As the late Nobel Laureate Albert Camus noted, we live to reason with an unreasonable world and it often leads to a conflicted life.
Life isn’t concerned with your artificial sense of importance.
When we convince ourselves that we’re more special than what the universe dictates, we tend to develop a sense of entitlement about what life owes us.
It’s about boldly staring life in the face and having the courage to say,.
“I might not be much, and I know I won’t always get what I want, but it sure as hell doesn’t mean that I won’t try.”And that, ultimately, is the purpose of life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The purpose of life is to be a nobody”

Acknowledging unimportance liberates us from the grips of the self-centered voice in our head that’s chiefly responsible for many of life’s difficulties.
It’s the voice that compares us to people that don’t matter, it’s the same voice that convinces us that we’re entitled to a comfortable and easy life, and it’s indeed this voice that has us chasing arbitrary measures of success.
We spend our time acquiring things we don’t want or need, we falter at the first sign of hardship and inconvenience, and one day, we wake up to a ticking clock realizing that, all this time, we’ve lived somebody else’s life.
It leads to a kind of paralysis that steals the potential of experiencing some of the great joys in life.
As the late Nobel Laureate Albert Camus noted, we live to reason with an unreasonable world and it often leads to a conflicted life.
Life isn’t concerned with your artificial sense of importance.
When we convince ourselves that we’re more special than what the universe dictates, we tend to develop a sense of entitlement about what life owes us.
It’s about boldly staring life in the face and having the courage to say, “I might not be much, and I know I won’t always get what I want, but it sure as hell doesn’t mean that I won’t try.”

The orginal article.