Summary of “How to Communicate Clearly During Organizational Change”

Too many followers tasked with delivering strategic change report that their leaders weren’t clear enough about what they wanted the change to achieve or about what it would entail.
Why do we need to change, and why now? What are the imperatives driving this change? Why is the previous strategy no longer good enough? Where on the P&L are we feeling, or anticipating, pain? Are you sure you want X to change, even if it means you can’t have Y anymore? What is the full extent of the change we need? Don’t underestimate the extent of the change you need, either privately or publicly.
Tempting it is to tell people that this is just an incremental change – when it is nothing of the sort – or however politically expedient it seems to underplay the extent of the change required, a lack of clarity about the extent of the change required will make subsequent conversations about resources and priorities much harder.
If we figure out 1 and 2, what should improve as a result? How will we measure the improvement we’ve been targeting ? And perhaps most overlooked of all: How does this new strategy or change link to previous strategies? Answering this question is critical if leaders are to reduce the confusion that a cumulative overload of strategic or change initiatives – another year, another “Strategy” – and their potentially conflicting targets can cause.
Living the change you want to see means much more than modeling any behaviors you’ve asked for; it also means making a myriad of decisions that support the change.
It is what David Nadler and Michael Tushman, in their 1990 exploration of how change becomes institutionalized, called “Mundane behaviors.” It means changing how you spend your time.
If you’re not giving time to the change you’ve asked for, followers will interpret this as the latest change not really being important, and will act accordingly.
If what gets measured is what gets managed, give the change its best chance by signaling as early as possible that new metrics will be introduced to measure, and therefore embed, the change you’ve asked for.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Do You Know Someone Has True Leadership Skills? Look for These 5 Signs”

Sometimes the only way you’ll truly know whether a leader’s skills are genuine is to measure the manager that made your life miserable against the one that had you thinking often, “This is too good to be true.”
If you think your boss is some freak of nature and you’re the luckiest person alive, I’ll break it to you gently: He or she is most likely the kind of leader who demonstrates best-in-class behaviors identified in the research of those leading the most profitable companies on the planet.
They are often referred to as servant leaders, conscious leaders, authentic leaders, or transformational leaders.
To get practical, let’s dive into the most prevalent leadership behaviors of such leaders.
Congratulations! Joy is an emotion evoked by well-being and success that’s experienced by every employee in healthy cultures under great leaders.
Next thing you know, you look up, it’s 5:30 p.m., and the place is still buzzing with energy and excitement, and people find it hard to pull away and go home.
People development is not a separate retention activity enforced by HR. It’s ingrained in the mindset of servant leaders.
Let’s face it, if you are considering developing leaders, trust is a pillar your company’s leadership should stand on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be an Inspiring Leader”

Our research shows that while anyone can become an inspiring leader, in most companies, there are far too few of them.
In employer surveys that we conducted with the Economist Intelligence Unit, we found that less than half of respondents said they agree or strongly agree that their leaders were inspiring or were unlocking motivation in employees.
To understand what makes a leader inspirational, Bain & Company launched a new research program, starting with a survey of 2,000 people.
Vision, focus, servanthood, and sponsorship help them lead. We found that people who inspire are incredibly diverse, which underscores the need to find inspirational leaders that are right for motivating your organization-there is no universal archetype.
A corollary of this finding is that anyone can become an inspirational leader by focusing on his or her strengths.
Although we found that many different attributes help leaders inspire people, we also found that you need only one of them to double your chances of being an inspirational leader.
Inspirational leaders recognize the need to pick their moments carefully to reinforce a performance culture in a way that can also be inspiring.
The more often they behave in a new way, the sooner they become a new type of leader, an inspirational leader.

The orginal article.