Summary of “Let’s Stop Pretending the NBA Cares About Its Tampering Rules”

The Pacers have filed tampering charges against the Lakers for impermissible contact with Paul George, the NBA confirmed Sunday after Peter Vecsey first broke the story late Saturday.
The Lakers denied the allegations, and in a statement the NBA said that “At this point, no findings have been made.” Vecsey reported that the independent law firm hired by the NBA asked the Lakers “To turn over any correspondence pertaining to Mintz and George, as well as his parents.” No matter what the NBA finds-or doesn’t-one thing is obvious: The NBA tampering rules are a complete joke.
Tampering has existed for decades, though the league has gotten more lenient on players “Recruiting” one another.
If there is proof the Lakers are guilty of tampering the punishment could be severe: a fine of up to $5 million, the forfeiture of draft picks, suspensions for any offending persons, or even restrictions that prevent them from acquiring George in 2018.
Not to mention that tampering might’ve indeed helped the Clippers.
If tampering was reviled by most of the league, the penalties and definition of tampering could’ve been amended in the most recent collective bargaining agreement.
Fred Katz of the Norman Transcript reported the Pacers planned on filing a tampering charge even before trading George to the Thunder.
Even though tampering is the norm, you can at least understand why they went ahead with it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Kyrie Irving-Isaiah Thomas Trade Is Unlike Anything We’ve Ever Seen”

Sometimes news that feels massive in the moment later appears to be supermassive-and I think that’s how we’ll look back on the Cavaliers-Celtics blockbuster trade of Kyrie Irving for Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Ante Zizic, and the Nets’ unprotected 2018 first-round pick.
Maybe Thomas will improve locker-room chemistry playing alongside childhood AAU buddy Kevin Love, and maybe Crowder will morph into the versatile two-way forward that the team has lacked for the past three years.
From a Boston standpoint, Ainge proved once again that he’s ruthless-trading Thomas, who fans truly fell in love with after his meteoric rise and the personal heartbreak he played through in the playoffs-and not complacent.
If they play their cards right and either Tatum or Brown shows upside, the Celtics could even put themselves in position to make another blockbuster trade down the line.
Listening to Ainge during his Tuesday conference call with the media, it’s clear that he put the same emphasis on that fact, as he mentioned Irving’s age multiple times, alluding to how a team has to “Pay a heavy price” for a “Perennial All-Star, a player that fits a timeline for us.”
Then there’s Thomas, who earned second-team All-NBA honors last season; who summoned the strength to take the court in the playoffs one day after his sister tragically passed away in April; and who played through a torn labrum and the effects of oral surgery until a hip injury ended his postseason in the conference finals against the Cavs. Along the way, Thomas turned in one of the greatest individual performances in recent memory, dropping 53 on the Wizards and entering a new stratosphere in Boston sports fandom.
It’s also possible Thomas isn’t even the best player asset they got in the deal.
Crowder played the best defense of his career directly after the Mavericks dealt him to the Celtics, so maybe his play will return to top form now that he’s out for revenge following another trade.

The orginal article.

Summary of “O.J. Mayo tries to save his NBA career after drug ban”

LOS ANGELES – O.J. Mayo broke down in tears when he heard the NBA was going to ban him for at least two years for a failed drug test, and he surely would have cried even harder if he had known the embarrassment, loneliness and aimlessness that would follow.
The NBA’s press release hit on the first day of free agency last summer, and Mayo fielded a brief round of sympathetic and surprised texts from his friends while media organizations reported the news and social media users speculated about his drug of choice.
“Everywhere Mayo turned after his ban, he ran into reality checks. The 6’5” scoring guard, who had first captured the basketball world’s attention as an ultra-confident West Virginia high schooler, had just completed a three-year, $24 million contract with the Bucks.
Once the 2016-17 NBA season started, a “Hurt” and “Lost” Mayo couldn’t bear to watch, consumed by remorse over the years that had preceded his ban.
After consulting with Dwaine Barnes, his longtime coach and grandfather figure, Mayo eventually decided to sit out the 2016-17 season to fully rehabilitate his ankle and “Get his stuff together.” For the first time in more than 20 years, the McDonald’s All-American, All-Pac 10 First Teamer and NBA All-Rookie First Teamer wasn’t part of a squad. “Taking the game away is probably the closest thing to jail that I’ll get to,” Mayo said.
As Mayo was building the new structure of his life, Bleacher Report ran a lengthy story about him in July entitled, “Whatever happened to O.J. Mayo? Not even some of his closest friends know.” The piece asserted that Mayo had disappeared and that “10 months of reporting” that included contacts with “40 of Mayo’s former teammates, coaches, agents, GMs and players union reps” had yielded nothing concrete as to his whereabouts.
Mayo hardly appeared to be a long-lost figure last Thursday, when he went through a series of scrimmages with Jimmy Butler, Dwyane Wade, Victor Oladipo, Taj Gibson, Snell, Ennis, Tyler Ulis, Josh Hart, Thomas Robinson, Jeremy Tyler and a host of other NBA players and hopefuls at a college gym on L.A.’s westside.
2018, Mayo will be eligible to apply for reinstatement to the NBA. Per league guidelines, both the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association must approve his return, and the two sides can consider a host of factors to weigh that decision, including the circumstances surrounding Mayo’s dismissal, his personal conduct during the ban, his character and morality, whether he has completed a treatment program, and whether he’s a “Suitable role model for youth.” Mayo must also be able to “Demonstrate by proof of random urine testing” that he has not failed any marijuana or drug tests for a year prior to his reinstatement application.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NFL Wasn’t Ready for Jabrill Peppers”

Jabrill Peppers was a trial balloon for the modern NFL. The league is supposed to be more accepting of hybrid players who can play multiple positions thanks to coaches who are supposed to be getting more creative.
At Michigan, Peppers was the über-athlete; he played snaps at 11 different positions.
If the NFL is truly going the way of basketball, where positional designations mean less and less every year, then Peppers should’ve been a top prospect.
A typical conversation with teams during predraft meetings, Peppers told me, went like this: “They said, ‘You do everything. You’re here, you’re here, you’re here. We’re going to play you at one position. How can we be sure that you’re going to master this position?'”.
Without any classes to attend or strict limits on practice time, Peppers told coaches he’d master whatever position they asked him to play.
Peppers will not speculate on where he’d have gone if he played safety every snap in college-he considers that a what if and he doesn’t entertain those-but it’s safe to say he thinks he’d have gone higher.
By the spring, McShay had him as a second-round pick and said he was “Struggling with his evaluation” of the Michigan star, mostly focusing on how despite playing there in college, Peppers was too small to play NFL linebacker like Bucannon has.
Plenty of talent evaluators thought he’d be great at running back, and Peppers said he’s open to playing offense in the pros but certainly not full time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fantasy Football Road Map”

It’s About Volume, Not Talent The first step for anyone hoping to master fantasy football is to stifle any biases you might have about the real-life talent that players possess.
That’s because it’s easier to predict carries and targets than it is to evaluate how much the level of a player’s talent will translate to the fantasy scoreboard.
After a meniscus injury shortened Anderson’s season to just seven games last year, it looks like fantasy players are sleeping on him: He’s just 84th in ESPN’s average draft position.
Of course, in fantasy football, as Footballguys co-owner Sigmund Bloom told me, “Every strategy works if you take the right players.
” -Scott Barrett, Pro Football Focus senior fantasy analyst Some players don’t fall into any specific bucket.
Suspensions can create a lot of uncertainty in the fantasy landscape, but sometimes it’s a gamble worth taking, whether you’re betting on the suspended player or his backup.
Even if you go off these principles, there’s plenty of room for error - that’s why finding a consensus on any one player in fantasy football is all but impossible.
If there was one overarching theme I heard from the various experts I talked to, it was to not lose sight of the point of playing fantasy football: to have fun.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Pittsburgh Steelers embrace physical side of football”

The receivers and defensive backs, in full pads, did the Oklahoma drill-the ultra-physical one-on-one blocking drill in which the defensive player tries to fight off the offensive player and get to the ball-carrier, and the offensive player tries to block the defensive player to the ground.
“Preparing to play without the physical part,” the 11th-year coach said, “Is like asking a boxer to go in and fight without sparring. There is a certain hardening that has to happen to your group individually and collectively, I believe, through this process. I believe live tackling not only aids in that, but is kind of central to that. That’s why we made the conscious effort to have at least 12 to 15 snaps a day of live football. It provides an opportunity, it sets the pace, it gives a certain urgency, in your group.”
“I feel like I am playing football the way I am supposed to play football, and I feel like I am the player I am supposed to be,” he said.
Dallas linebacker Jaylon Smith, the team’s second-round pick in 2016, who had not played in a football game since suffering a debilitating knee injury in Notre Dame’s Jan. 1, 2016, Fiesta Bowl game.
VI. “Every year you try to build your team the best that you can, and so we did what we felt like was the best way to build our team. I mean, I don’t know what the options are going to be next year, but whatever they are, we’re going to do the best we can with them. To say that we wouldn’t trade for a player or we wouldn’t pay a player this much, or we wouldn’t do this or we wouldn’t do that, I mean, I don’t know what those I don’t have any of those rules.”
“We played everywhere in the preseason in our early days: Tulsa, Birmingham, New Orleans, Bakersfield, Sacramento, Atlanta, Roanoke. We played a doubleheader in Cleveland in 1962. We played Detroit, and then Cleveland played someone [Pittsburgh], back to back. We played in Norman, Okla. We played in Sioux Falls. But our first year, 1960, that was really something. We played an exhibition game in the smallest place ever to host an NFL preseason game-Pendleton, Ore. Look it up!”.
“It was a pretty memorable day, for a lot of reasons. The stadium was actually their rodeo grounds, and it turns out the rodeo just finished the day before, right on the field where we played. It was lined like a football field, but it was in pretty rough shape. When our players came off the field, they were saying there was still droppings on the field from the rodeo.”
Most players on the two teams lined up to shake hands and embrace or bro-hug after the second day of workouts in West Virginia.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Don’t Soccer Stars Sign Contracts Like LeBron James and Kevin Durant?”

The club has either decided not to or isn’t able to sell its pair of stars, and the Premier League season has already begun with both of them playing on contracts that conclude at the end of it.
At the time, European clubs worried that the ever-important revenue from transfer fees would dry up: If players could just run out their contracts and sign wherever they wanted, why wouldn’t they do that? Without transfer fees attached to their signing, more money would presumably go toward their salaries.
“For top players who have the leverage to do so, signing shorter contracts and/or running down existing contracts is a strategy that could pay off in a big way,” said Jake Cohen, a sports lawyer who has Premier League clients.
If you sacrifice a five-year contract for a two-year deal and then struggle with injuries, performance, or playing time, you’ve likely lost the same level of long-term security you could have initially had. “The optimal way for footballers to mitigate the risks involved in signing shorter deals may be to sign long-term deals, but with these NBA-style opt-out clauses,” Cohen said.
LeBron James signed a two-year deal with a player option in the second year when he first went back to the Cleveland Cavaliers, then opted out, did the same thing, opted out again, and then signed a three-year deal last summer with the ability to opt out again, as everyone expects him to, next summer.
Kevin Durant signed a two-year deal with the Golden State Warriors in 2016 but opted out this summer-only to sign another deal with the same player option.
Of course, those are the two best players in basketball and soccer; they’re in position to sign such player-favorable deals because they immediately reset the balance of the sport every time they sign a contract.
For a nonsuperstar soccer player to sign a deal with an opt-out clause, they’d likely have to settle for a contract with a substantially lower total value than they would have otherwise received.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NFL’s Real Spencer Strasmore Is the Anti-‘Ballers'”

Since his NFL retirement, Kerney graduated from Columbia Business School with an MBA in 2012; spent a summer learning the ropes as an intern with an asset-management firm; created a small consulting practice, Seacon, where he focused for more than a year on teaching and presenting financial concepts to professional and amateur athletes; and in 2013 joined the NFL’s Player Engagement office, where he managed league benefits and created an annual multiday offseason NFL symposium called the Personal Finance Boot Camp that exposes players to sessions ranging from behavioral finance to multigenerational wealth preservation and is led by finance professors, wealth managers, and Kerney himself.
Wanting to take a more active, independent, and transparent role in investing client money alongside his own, Kerney transitioned in 2015 to a role as director of business development at NFC Investments, where he oversees the portfolios of a small group of clients that includes current NFL players, league veterans, and coaches.
As a former player who now helps counsel NFL guys on the best ways to handle their cash, Kerney’s situation seems a lot, on the surface, like that of Spencer Strasmore, the lead character played by Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson in the series Ballers, which airs on Ringer initial investor HBO. Strasmore is a retired NFL linebacker who is forging a second career in wealth management, but the qualities that make him a lively, charismatic television presence-his disarming smile; his constant clashes with a sardonic, greedy boss; his shiny vests; his ambition and opportunism-aren’t always what define a reliable, trustworthy financial adviser in real life.
Strasmore does indeed look good in a suit, and he knows it, peacocking around in loud custom threads; Kerney delivers presentations while wearing sensible half-zip sweaters.
There was also a time when he owned a boat, but as he told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, he learned quickly why there’s an old joke that the two best days of a boat owner’s life are the day they buy the boat and the day they sell it; or why “BOAT” is said to stand for “Break Out Another Thousand.” On this topic, Kerney and Strasmore would fundamentally agree on the concept, if not necessarily the message: “Never buy a depreciating asset,” Strasmore explains in Season 1.
“Golden handcuffs is real. A lot of guys, you’re so wrapped up in this life where people expect you to be a certain person, often financially, and when the money stops coming in you lose that.”-Rashard Mendenhall, retired running back and Ballers writer Lester Archambeau, a veteran who was in the second-to-last season of his career in 1999 and who was a union rep for the Falcons, recalls Kerney as “a lacrosse convert, so he was undersized-real athletic, but undersized, and he had an incredible motor.” Kerney says that one day Archambeau walked by him in the locker room and threw him a book to read. “It was The Millionaire Next Door,” Kerney says, referring to the Thomas Stanley classic of prudence and frugality.
Co/JGerMr5v6X.- Patrick Kerney November 16, 2016 Kerney is particularly passionate about the impact of hidden fees or management costs on a player’s portfolio, because, given the young age of the athletes, even amounts that seem relatively insignificant now will, over time, go forth and multiply.
“You just never know who has your best interests in mind.” What you don’t hear much about are the players like Mendenhall, who have early influencers in their lives who give them beneficial, lasting advice; or the various players who, Kerney says, enjoy positive outcomes from their conservative, plain-vanilla investment decisions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NFL’s Mindfulness Movement Is Spreading”

The way Russ Rausch remembers it, the discontent took hold about 11 years ago.
Now 53, Rausch has cut his time in finance to only a few hours each week, shaped a company called Vision Pursue, and emerged as one of the leading figures of a movement that’s spreading in NFL circles: mindfulness training.
By creating an app to facilitate scheduled meditation and mindfulness exercises, Rausch has provided a resource that espouses similar ideas in a way that fits the rhythm of NFL routines.
In their first years on the job, Shanahan and Colts general manager Chris Ballard have introduced Vision Pursue to their respective locker rooms, and Rausch’s program has become a fixture of what Falcons head coach Dan Quinn has built in Atlanta.
Quinn’s introduction to Rausch is one of the many chance encounters that has allowed Vision Pursue and its philosophy to spread throughout sports.
Jon McGraw, a 10-year NFL veteran who spent the final five years of his career with the Chiefs, cofounded the company with Rausch shortly after the two met at a charity event in 2013.
With the formation of Vision Pursue, McGraw and Rausch tried to create a shared language structured around the work of Haanel, Tolle, and others.
Long before Quinn invited Rausch and McGraw to speak to his roster in Atlanta, the pair honed their approach while pitching corporations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the most epic trick play in history broke baseball”

The Portsmouth High Patriots, like almost every high school baseball team, kept a trick play in their pocket.
High school baseball, and maybe only high school baseball, is built for trick plays.
LET’S DEFINE A baseball play like this: It is a sequence of actions during which events in progress cannot be stopped by a timeout.
A baseball game has no clock, but a baseball play has its own internal countdown, as the sprawl of defenders progresses toward order, funneling all the wide-open ambition of a baseball field into an ever-smaller space.
I have found a play that took 26 seconds, and one that took 29 seconds, but I have never seen a play that took longer.
East Greenwich first baseman Steve Salvator was trying to counter with his own trick play.
The trick plays book had ways to defend the skunk play.
THE LONGEST PLAY ever, and it’s not even a line in the play log.

The orginal article.