Summary of “How to be happy: Stop being positive and just cultivate neutrality”

You’ve likely been asked how you see the proverbial glass: half full or half empty? Your answer allegedly reflects your attitude about life-if you see it half full, you’re optimistic, and if you see it half empty, you’re pessimistic.
Thus, the good answer is to see the glass half full.
Actually, the glass isn’t half full or half empty.
Things aren’t mutually exclusive, awesome or awful.
This provides clarity and eliminates obstacles, making things neither awesome nor awful but cool.
We identify with our thoughts, and decide whether or not we like things before experience begins.
Things can go just so or totally awry once you understand that all things are fine, their upsides and downsides to be determined.
That perspective provides resilience, the ability to keep going instead of getting stuck imaging how things could or should be or will be when things go some other way.
Plus, everything is relative and shifting, In an uncertain world with so many forces at play, the only thing that’s sure is that things could be different and won’t stay the same.
You may as well stay neutral in that case, rather than get attached to a temporary state in which the glass is half full or half empty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Avoid Burnout: 3 Secrets From Research”

From The Truth About Burnout: How Organizations Cause Personal Stress and What to Do About It:. three things happen: you become chronically exhausted; you become cynical and detached from your work; and you feel increasingly ineffective on the job.
Work engagement significantly increased and teachers’ burnout significantly decreased after vacation.
So what gives? What is burnout really? Where does it come from? And what do we have to do to avoid it? Time for some real answers.
What Burnout Really Is. Burnout isn’t being overworked or not getting enough rest.
We commonly refer to the problem as “Burnout,” but what’s fascinating is that psychologists have realized that burnout isn’t just an acute overdose of stress; it’s pretty much plain ol’ clinical depression.
The paper, “Comparative Symptomatology of Burnout and Depression,” said, “Our findings do not support the view hypothesizing that burnout and depression are separate entities.”
Researchers Cary Cherniss and David Kranz found that burnout was “Virtually absent in monasteries, Montessori schools, and religious care centers where people consider their work as a calling rather than merely a job.”
Does this theory really help you avoid burnout in the real world? Yes.
When the American Medical Association surveyed top doctors to find out how they avoided burnout, one of the key things mentioned was “Sharing issues with family and friends.”
Burnout is depression: You’re not tired from your job; you’re pessimistic about your job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A psychologist explains why we’re probably all delusional and how to fix it”

Almost nobody is self-aware, says psychologist Tasha Eurich in her new book Insight.
Not to say they were being intentionally misleading, but there is work showing that if people have rose-colored glasses, they might feel good in some sense, but they also tend to be less happy, less successful and, equally importantly, the people around them tend to view them pretty negatively, which has bad effects.
When we’re delusional about ourselves, we frustrate and alienate the people around us too.
If someone thinks they’re good at something when they’re not, we say they’re “Not self-aware.” But if they’re deluded in the other direction and think they’re worse than they are, we don’t say they’re “Not self-aware,” we say they’re “Insecure.” Why the difference? Are the insecure people also not self-aware?
It kind of does make sense because part of truly being self-aware is understanding how you come across to other people and the impact you have on them.
One thing you emphasize is that the people who introspect the most aren’t any more self-aware than others.
Some people are really scared of not being self-aware and analyze all these things to try to get there.
So one of the biggest mistakes people make, especially self-conscious and self-critical people, is believing that type of thinking is good for them or beneficial in some way.
The people who are the most self-aware don’t force themselves into those simple kind of absolute truths.
One of the really self-aware people explained it by saying that the process of self-exploration is like exploring space: there’s so much we don’t know, and that’s what makes it so exciting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When the Patient Is a Gold Mine: The Trouble With Rare-Disease Drugs”

Now a sales rep was on the other end of Owens’s phone from Alexion Pharmaceuticals Inc., the New Haven-based maker of Soliris-one of the world’s most expensive drugs, typically priced from $500,000 to $700,000 a year.
Alexion is a powerhouse in the market for orphan drugs, a fast-growing pocket of the pharmaceutical industry that focuses on rare diseases.
If somebody had stopped taking Soliris, the managers would turn to the nurse assigned to that patient: What steps did you take to keep the patient on the drug? Have you told the patient he could get a potentially fatal blood clot if he stops? Did you steer the patient to a different doctor who might resume treatment? “It was your feet to the fire, sweat pouring down your back,” says one former longtime company nurse, who requested anonymity because she feared retaliation from the company.
With two very uncommon diseases, Alexion has long faced a question that vexes most orphan drug companies: How do you find those extremely rare patients and steer doctors to your drug? To find those “Needles in a haystack,” as Alexion’s Bell has described such patients, sales reps spend the majority of their time talking to doctors, getting them to look for symptoms and encouraging them to test for the rare diseases.
Alexion set out to persuade doctors to test more frequently for PNH and aHUS-and to find a way to glimpse these test results, which traditionally have been shared only among the patient, the doctor ordering the test, and the lab.
Overseas, Alexion has developed even tighter relationships with patient advocacy organizations.
Most patients don’t have the resources to pursue such a lawsuit, which is known as “Judicialization,” so Alexion started and funded a patient group called the Association of Patients with PNH. The group’s primary lawyers, who spearheaded the judicialization suits on behalf of patients, initially came from a law firm owned by the sister of Alexion’s local manager, according to a December 2014 confidential analysis conducted by an outside law firm that Alexion had hired to review its business practices in Brazil.
Every week, an Alexion manager went to AFAG’s office to go through patient files, according to internal documents.
The manager told AFAG which cases to pursue and took all the latest patient information back to Alexion, according to a former manager.
Alexion’s Diamond says the company has operated “In accordance with local laws” and that it “Has not been charged with any criminal or civil misconduct at this time.” In a discussion with investors on May 16, CEO Hantson said Alexion was striving to improve how it works with patient groups in Brazil and elsewhere.

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Summary of “This Is The Ultimate Life Hack”

“When I look back at my life, I am happy to have had what most people would consider a successful life, not only regarding business but in my relationships and in lots of ways.More than anything else, I attribute it to meditation - partially because of the creativity, partly because of the centeredness.I think meditation has been the single biggest influence on my life.” ~ Ray DalioThe appeal of meditation is that it is universally accessible, requires no formalized training, is free to practice and is said to alleviate many of the mysterious ills of society - including stress, anxiety, depression and a host of other disorders.
People have been meditating for thousands of years, and with that kind of track record, it surely isn’t a fad.In the modern “Life hacking” era of everyone wanting a shortcut to success and happiness, meditation is the ultimate life hack that few people are actually using.
The number of individuals who develop a long-standing meditation practice are few and far between.
Others, once starting down the meditation path, confront challenges that cause them to give us the practice altogether.
How to Start MeditatingJust as you wouldn’t leave the house without taking a shower, you shouldn’t start the day without at least 10 minutes of sacred practice: prayer, meditation, inspirational reading.
You will find that with practice, even a short 5-minute meditation can have a significantly positive impact.
Art of Living, Transcendental Meditation, and the Indian Yoga traditions tend to fall into this style of meditation practice.
Be consistent for the first few months of your meditation practice.
Once you have a regular practice, then you may wish to try different meditation techniques.
To the monasteries in Tibet or Japan to the Ashrams in India, meditators have always learned from teachers and engaged together in group meditation practice periodically.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Death of the smartphone and what comes after”

One day, not too soon – but still sooner than you think – the smartphone will all but vanish, the way beepers and fax machines did before it.
Make no mistake: We’re still probably at least a decade away from any kind of meaningful shift away from the smartphone.
Piece by piece, the groundwork for the eventual demise of the smartphone is being laid by Elon Musk, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, and a countless number of startups that still have a part to play.
Let me tell you: If and when the smartphone does die, that’s when things are going to get really weird for everybody.
Here’s a brief look at the slow, ceaseless march toward the death of the smartphone – and what the post-smartphone world is shaping up to look like.
Consider the smartphone from another perspective.
The smartphone just took that model, shrank it, and made the input virtual and touch-based.
Microsoft’s Alex Kipman recently told Business Insider that augmented reality could flat-out replace the smartphone, the TV, and anything else with a screen.
If smartphones gave us access to information and augmented reality puts that information in front of us when we need it, then putting neural lace in our brains just closes the gap.
So if and when the smartphone dies, it’ll actually be the end of an era in more ways than one.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Strategic Choices Need to Be Made Simultaneously, Not Sequentially”

Although I have always emphasized that these five choices have to link together and reinforce each other, hence the arrows flowing back and forth between the boxes, it has become clear to me that I haven’t done a good enough job of making this point, especially as it relates to the choices of Where to Play and How to Win.
I had to tell my Australian friend that locking and loading on Where to Play choices, rather than setting the table for a great discussion of How to Win, actually makes it virtually impossible to have a productive consideration of How to Win.
An infinite number of Where to Play choices are possible, and equally meritorious – before considering each’s How to Win.
Making lists of Where to Play choices before considering How to Win choices has zero value in strategy.
Uber made a Where to Play choice that included China because it’s a huge and important market.
Microsoft made a Where to Play choice to get into smartphone hardware because it was a huge and growing market, seemingly adjacent to Microsoft’s own, but it had no useful conception of how that would be twinned with a How to Win – and it lost spectacularly.
P&G made a Where to Play choice to get into the huge, profitable, and growing pharmaceutical business with the acquisition of Norwich Eaton, in 1982.
All How to Win choices are useful, or not, depending on the Where to Play with which they are paired.
As a Canadian, I can’t help but recall the many Canadian retailers with powerful How to Wins in Canada that simply didn’t translate to a Where to Play in the U.S. Perhaps there is some solace in retailer Target’s disastrous attempt to extend its U.S. How to Win into the Canadian Where to Play – turnabout is, I guess, fair play.
The only productive, intelligent way to generate possibilities for strategy choice is to consider matched pairs of Where to Play and How to Win choices.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Check This Box if You’re a Good Person”

Working in undergraduate admissions at Dartmouth College has introduced me to many talented young people.
Every year I’d read over 2,000 college applications from students all over the world.
The problem is that in a deluge of promising candidates, many remarkable students become indistinguishable from one another, at least on paper.
The most surprising indication of kindness I’ve ever come across in my admissions career came from a student who went to a large public school in New England.
The custodian wrote that he was compelled to support this student’s candidacy because of his thoughtfulness.
This student, the custodian wrote, had a refreshing respect for every person at the school, regardless of position, popularity or clout.
Over 15 years and 30,000 applications in my admissions career, I had never seen a recommendation from a school custodian.
It gave us a window onto a student’s life in the moments when nothing “Counted.” That student was admitted by unanimous vote of the admissions committee.
The way a student acts toward his parents on a campus tour can mean as much as a standardized test score.
Whether or not he even decides to go to college when the time is right, I want him to resemble a person thoughtful enough to return a granola bar, and gracious enough to respect every person in his community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Staggering Predictions From Ray Kurzweil”

Want to know what the future’s going to be like? There’s no better person to ask than Ray Kurzweil, the intellectual and inventor who predicted – among other things – the fall of the Soviet Union and the rapid expansion of the internet back in 1990.
According to Kurzweil, “The singularity” will occur in 2045; but even though the point of the singularity is that technology advances so rapidly that humans can’t even fathom what the post-singularity future will look like, Kurzweil himself seems to have no problem imagining the craziest set of possibilities.
That’s because, as Kurzweil describes in his 2005 book The Singularity Is Near, we’ll have “Very high-bandwidth wireless internet access woven in our clothing.”
Virtual Reality = RealityBy the late 2020s, it will be impossible to distinguish reality from virtual reality.
The implications of this are endless, but one of the things Kurzweil mentions in TSIN is how this will affect your sex life.
“In virtual reality,” he writes, “We can be a different person both physically and emotionally. In fact, other people will be able to select a different body for you than you might select for yourself.” People won’t need sex dolls to sleep with Scarlett Johansson lookalikes.
Computers Surpass Humans Really SoonBy 2029, a computer will pass the Turing test.3.
Humans Become MachinesBy the early 2030s, technology will be able to copy human brains and put them onto electronic mechanisms.
In TSIN, Kurzweil says our immortality will work like computer software: “When we change from an older computer to a newer one, we don’t throw all our files away. Rather, we copy them and reinstall them on the new hardware.”
The Universe Will Be a SupercomputerBy 2099, machines will be creating planet-sized computers, and eventually we’ll make the entire universe into an enormous supercomputer.

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