Summary of “Driving Tesla’s Model 3 Changes Everything”

Sure, driving a fully loaded electric beast is as thrilling as the fiercest roller coaster-but not everyone wants their daily commute to be the Kingda Ka. After taking one of the first drives of Tesla’s new Model 3 last week, I came away thinking that CEO Elon Musk has finally delivered an electric car for the everyday road tripper like me.
Unlike early versions of the Model S and X, the Model 3 is built to be a daily driver, with plenty of cupholders, door pockets, and console storage.
Since Musk handed over keys to the first 30 cars on Friday, I’ve heard a lot of people trying to compare the Model 3 to GM’s all-electric Chevy Bolt.
The company plans to make the same transition with its Model S and Model X platforms later.
The new Model 3 has won Tesla the trophy for cheapest range for the money, defeating the $37,500 Bolt, which is outclassed by the Model 3 in virtually every category.
The video below compares the side-impact test of the Model 3 against the Volvo S60, which is considered to be one of the safest cars on the road. “In the Model 3, you’re fine,” Musk said.
The key obstacle, of course, is making all of these cars quickly enough and without the problems that plagued the launch of its more complicated Model X. Tesla is counting on everything going right at its car plant in Fremont, California, as well as its massive battery factory under construction near Reno, Nevada.
I asked Franz von Holzhausen, Tesla’s chief designer responsible for the Models S, X, and 3, what are his favorite design elements of the Model 3.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Worst Possible Workplace for Each Myers-Briggs Personality Type”

Certain personality types are naturally well-suited for certain workplace roles-which means that, naturally, each type is a little bit less suited for other roles.
Here’s the workplace condition that would make coming into the office every morning feel like torture, based on your Myers-Briggs personality type.
ENFP: A workplace run by an immoral management team where any pushback about the unfair working conditions could serve as a direct threat to the ENFP’s career.
ENFJ: A cutthroat and competitive workplace where collaboration is frowned upon and employees are pitted against one another in order to succeed.
INFJ: A workplace that exploits honest customers in order to make money and treats its employees like replaceable commodities.
ENTJ: A workplace that completely lacks a long-term vision and requires strict adherence to the decisions of an incompetent management team.
ESFP: A workplace with virtually no corporate culture where employees don’t interact with one another and the day-to-day tasks rarely change.
ISFJ: A workplace that fails to provide them with specific rules or instructions for the projects they’re working on but expects “Big things” of them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s the quickest way to learn a language?”

Instead, you should look at your mobile the other way around: as a way to supercharge your foreign-language learning.
For the beginning language learner, there are no miraculous ways around learning grammar and vocabulary.
Learning to speak means being able to call to mind rules and vocabulary in an instant.
Rosetta Stone, much marketed, now offers a competitive subscription price, but its approach of teaching through pictures, without ever using the learner’s native language, is best kept for easy European languages.
If learning Spanish, French, Italian or German, try “News in Slow Spanish”, a subscription service with weekly news broadcasts in realistic language, but read at a slower clip.
Take it in short chunks: much better to learn one minute of audio perfectly than five minutes with poor comprehension.
Go over the cards at the end of each day, remembering the context in which you learned the word.
One easy way is through Italki, a social network which will help you find both trained teachers and more informal “Tutors”: both can be inexpensive, the latter especially so, and this unstructured but guided conversation practice is exactly what the intermediate learner needs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Which Way Out of the Venezuelan Crisis?”

For an article entitled “Being Honest About Venezuela,” Gonzalez begins with a strange conspiracy theory: that a helicopter attack against government targets was really a false flag operation carried out by the government itself.
Gonzalez’s goal is to reveal Maduro’s “Betrayal” of the Revolution, but this betrayal takes the form of a catch-22: the government is ineffective, but if it attempts to act, it is authoritarian; when it defends itself in a far less heavy-handed fashion than most governments would, it is repressive; it is fiscally irresponsible, but criticized for turning out of desperation to extractive projects like the Arco Minero; if it fails to fill the shelves, it is useless, but collaborating with private companies to do so is high treason; and when an admittedly problematic socialist party acts in a partisan way – this being, after all, what revolutionary parties are meant to do – it becomes an “Instrument of political repression.”
For a revolutionary socialist, the author seems to hold liberal democracy in high esteem, misleadingly decrying Chavismo’s “Packed institutions” and deeming the government “Increasingly antidemocratic” without specifying by what measure.
With little more than a nod to imperialism, global capital, or the brutality of the Venezuelan opposition, Gonzalez heaps blame on Maduro’s shoulders.
Like the mainstream media, he doesn’t tell us who is responsible for the deaths in the streets, and like the mainstream media, he offers decontextualized tragedies as proof of the government’s failure.
The government is not the Bolivarian project, which goes far beyond the presidency – this is why they haven’t been able to defeat it and why it is still in the streets today.
The Constituent Assembly is a step toward this, but we also need to cleanse the government and the institutions, where there is too much corruption and bureaucracy.
We must be critical toward the government and build a true alternative capable of governing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do When You’ve Picked the Wrong Suburb”

The couple gravitated north to Westchester County, where they had lived in their 20s and where Mr. Curry, an ordained minister and the director of connectional ministries for the United Methodist Church in New York, had served as a pastor.
Even if a possibility looks great on paper, one person’s idea of a great place to live can be another person’s nightmare.
“Just like someone living on the Upper East Side won’t fit into Williamsburg, someone who likes Maplewood may not fit into Short Hills. You can end up in a place that really doesn’t suit you.”
Moving to a new suburb may be the way to recapturing your identity, whether it’s somewhere where you can walk to dinner or a place with more like-minded people.
You should give serious thought to who lives in the town and what types of things go on there.
“Choosing a place to live is the single most expensive decision many of us ever make, and many of us make it mostly on intuition,” said Richard Florida, an urban theorist at the University of Toronto who studies demographic shifts, and is the author of “The Rise of the Creative Class”.
Julie LaChapelle, 41, had been living in the Riverdale section of the Bronx when she moved in 2003 to Verona, N.J., about an hour by car outside of Manhattan.
Ms. LaChapelle knows she’s taking a risk, and she doesn’t want to disrupt her daughters’ lives and move again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Overthinker’s Guide to Taking Action”

As Gregg Krech writes in his book The Art of Taking Action: Lessons from Japanese Psychology, external reality remains exactly the same after your decision to ask someone out, to write a book, or leave your job.
Thomas Jefferson once said, “Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.”
You can never get real progress if you don’t take action.
All of the self-help articles in the world can’t save you if you never take action.
The only thing more daunting than taking action is taking no action.
Actually, holding on to too many things to do without necessarily getting them done or taken action makes you anxious and stressed.
Limit your planning time and take actionCommitting to action doesn’t end once you make ptogress.
Dale Carnegie once said, “Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.”

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Summary of “Best exercise for your brain and body”

A wealth of recent research, including a new study published this month, suggests that any type of exercise that raises your heart rate and gets you moving and sweating for a sustained period of time – known as aerobic exercise – has a significant, overwhelmingly beneficial impact on the brain.
At the end of a week, people who’d done aerobic exercise every day were not only significantly less tired than those who did little to no exercise, but also did significantly better on the app’s quizzes.
“The message for cancer patients and survivors is, get active!” said Diane Ehlers, the lead author on the study and a professor of exercise psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, in a statement.
Still, the evidence that aerobic workouts have a wide range of potential beneficial impacts on the brain – from reducing the symptoms of depression to strengthening connections in parts of the brain linked with memory – is robust and growing.
If you’re over 50, a study in the British Medical Journal suggests the best results come from combining aerobic and resistance exercise, which could include anything from high-intensity interval training, like the 7-minute workout, to dynamic flow yoga, which intersperses strength-building poses like planks and push-ups with heart-pumping dance-like moves.
Researchers still aren’t sure why this type of exercise appears to provide a boost to the brain, but studies suggest it has to do with increased blood flow, which provides our minds with fresh energy and oxygen.
One recent study in older women who displayed potential symptoms of dementia found that aerobic exercise was linked with an increase in the size of the hippocampus, a brain area involved in learning and memory.
Joe Northey, the lead author of the British study and an exercise scientist at the University of Canberra, said his research suggests that anyone in good health over age 50 should do 45 minutes to an hour of aerobic exercise “On as many days of the week as feasible.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can sugar make you sad? A new study shows a link between sugar and depression”

In addition to being linked to conditions like obesity, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, eating high levels of sugar has been associated with mental illnesses like depression.
In a study published July 27 in Scientific Reports that followed over 8,000 adults over 22 years, researchers from University College London found that men who reported consuming foods that contained 67 grams of sugar per day or more were 23% more likely to be diagnosed with clinical depression after five years from when the study began.
After the first five-year follow up, men who ate the most sugar, which the authors categorize as 67 grams or more per day-almost twice the amount of sugar intake recommended by the American Heart Association, and roughly three and a half regular sized Snickers bars-had higher rates of mental health diagnoses than those who ate less sugar, regardless of whether or not they were overweight.
Even during years when participants reported eating less sugar, levels of mental illness stayed the same, which suggests that previous sugar habits had led to depression or anxiety and not the other way around.
In this study, the relationship between sugar and mental illness wasn’t well-defined among women.
The only thing that could would be a randomized controlled study, which would be unethical to perform knowing the links between sugar and other health consequences, Knuppel says.
James Gangwisch, a psychologist at Columbia University who found a link between sugar and depression in postmenopausal women, has postulated that foods high in sugar that are easy to break down may cause our blood sugar to immediately rise, and then plummet.
It’s worth considering how much added sugar is in your own diet beyond what’s found naturally in foods like fruits, which don’t give us the same blood sugar spike that foods like candy do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Universe Doesn’t Care About Your ‘Purpose'”

From particle physics to cosmology, we see that the universe operates well without purpose.
Entropy is the degree of disorder in a system, for example our universe.
The universe certainly started with a bang, but it likely ends with a fizzle.
The universe as we understand it tells us nothing about the goal or meaning of existence, let alone our own.
Sean Carroll, a prominent cosmologist and theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, makes this case in his recent book “The Big Picture.” Fashioning himself the “Poetic naturalist,” Carroll argues that meaning and purpose “Aren’t built into the architecture of the universe; they emerge as ways of talking about our human-scale environment.” Even materialists can’t deny the fact that purposes somehow exist to give us meaning and happiness.
Purpose springs from our longing for permanence in an ever-changing universe.
We create purposes to establish happy endings in a universe where endings are simply that – endings.
The T-Bird will decay along with everything in the universe as the fundamental particles we’re made of return to the inert state in which everything began.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Filter Bubbles Distort Reality: Everything You Need to Know”

Your work circle acts as a filter bubble, too, depending on whom you know and at what level you operate.
In his revolutionary book Filter Bubbles, Pariser explained how Google searches bring up vastly differing results depending on the history of the user.
In an attention economy, filter bubbles assist search engines, websites, and platforms in their goal to command the maximum possible share of our online time.
Many people have debated the impact of filter bubbles on the recent US election and the Brexit vote.
In the US election and the Brexit vote, filter bubbles caused people to become insulated from alternative views.
From the outside, we can see the issues with a combination of filter bubbles and groupthink, but they can be hard to identify from the inside.
Fish don’t know they are in the water and we don’t know we are in a filter bubble unless we take the effort to leave the capsule – if you dare.
In shaping what we see, filter bubbles show us a distorted map and not the terrain.

The orginal article.