Summary of “Wireless mesh networks explained”

You would be forgiven for thinking that wireless mesh networking is just another marketing bullet point for new Wi-Fi routers, a phrase coined to drive up prices without delivering benefits.
Mesh networks are resilient, self-configuring, and efficient.
Mesh networks solve a particular problem: covering a relatively large area, more than about 1,000 square feet on a single floor, or a multi-floor dwelling or office, especially where there’s no ethernet already present to allow easier wired connections of non-mesh Wi-Fi routers and wireless access points.
The concept of mesh networks first appeared in the 1980s in military experiments, and it became commercially available in the 1990s.
Mesh networking treats each base station as a node that exchanges information continuously about network conditions with all adjacent nodes across the entire set.
Mesh networks don’t retransmit all the data passing through among a set of base stations.
Luma Home, Inc. The principle behind all wireless networking is “How do I transmit this number of bits in the smallest number of microseconds and get off and let someone else use it?” explains Matthew Gast, former chair of the IEEE 802.11 committee that sets specs used by Wi-Fi. Mesh networks manage this better than WDS. In some cases, Gast notes, a mesh node might send a packet of data to just one other node; in others, a weak signal and other factors might route the packet through other nodes to reach the destination base station to which the destination wireless device is connected.
Because you don’t have to plan where mesh nodes go, mesh systems automatically reconfigure as you add nodes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Hard Things You Have to Do to Move Forward with Your Life”

Maybe it’s the life lessons I was forced to learn the hard way, or the toll of loss and failure I had recently endured, but a decade ago, in the midst of a panic attack on my 27th birthday, I had to admit to myself right then and there that the youthful world of possibility I once felt now seemed dead inside me.
You have to admit, you’ve spent a lot of your life subconsciously belittling yourself.
Being able to distinguish needs from wants is essential in every walk of life.
Never let go of an outcome you truly need in your life, but be reasonably flexible on the outcomes you want but could live fine without.
Constantly criticizing yourself is just as counterproductive as doing nothing, because you will never be able to build new positive changes into your life when you’re obsessively focused on your flaws.
Yes, being grateful seems simple enough, but a grateful state of mind is unbelievably hard to maintain when life disappoints us.
Thus, thinking about others instead of oneself helps solve feelings self-consciousness and inadequacy, which in turn makes you feel a lot less broken and alone when you’re struggling to move your life forward.
What else would you add to the list? What’s one hard thing you do that has helped you move your life forward? Leave a comment below and share your thoughts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Substituting Beans for Beef Would Help the U.S. Meet Climate Goals”

Donald Trump has called climate change a fabrication on the part of “The Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive.” He has also led the United States to become the only G20 country that will not honor the Paris Climate Accord, and who has appointed fossil-fuel advocates to lead the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Agency.
Recently Harwatt and a team of scientists from Oregon State University, Bard College, and Loma Linda University calculated just what would happen if every American made one dietary change: substituting beans for beef.
The beans belong to a feed lot that holds 38,000 cattle, the growth and fattening of which means dispensing 900 metric tons of feed every day.
Which is to say that these beans will be eaten by cows, and the cows will convert the beans to meat, and the humans will eat the meat.
In the process, the cows will emit much greenhouse gas, and they will consume far more calories in beans than they will yield in meat, meaning far more clearcutting of forests to farm cattle feed than would be necessary if the beans above were simply eaten by people.
If Americans traded their beef for beans, the researchers found, that would free up 42 percent of U.S. crop land.
Rather the beans for beef scenario is the dietary equivalent of effective altruism-focusing on where efforts will have the highest yield.
Regardless of a person’s degree of ecoanxiety, there is some recourse in knowing how far individuals can go to make up for a regressive federal administration simply by eating beans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NBA bust Darko Milicic finds success back home in Serbia”

By the time scouts started coming around, Darko saw the NBA as a way out – of financial insecurity, of persistent tumult, of Serbia – more than any kind of childhood fantasy coming true.
He actually does not follow the NBA much at all, he says, and he isn’t kidding: I first meet Darko in June, just days after the Golden State Warriors took a 2-0 lead on the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals.
Publicly, the Celtics said Darko had asked for his release so he could return home to be with his mother, who was sick.
Zorana had packed everything, and the family flew back to Serbia the day after Darko’s conversation with Rivers.
In an effort at clarity, I ask Darko to describe himself politically – like, why does he have those men tattooed on his stomach? – and Darko says he is a nationalist but adds that the label doesn’t mean the same thing in Eastern Europe as it might in the United States.
Darko’s feelings about Serbia are complicated – the wars, the fighting, the instability of his childhood – but can ultimately boil down to this: He says of his country, “I love mine, and I respect others.” It’s a big part of the reason he moved back to Serbia instead of remaining in the United States after he had finished playing, like so many foreign athletes do.
In addition to teaching Darko how to shower, Billups taught Darko how to drive.
Darko says the truck isn’t running now because it got damaged in a traffic accident involving Darko, a dark road, a sharp turn, fog and a herd of cows that were not as visible as one might have imagined.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple and the Oak Tree – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

1 By the spring of 2003 Apple had introduced the iTunes Music Store, a seamless and legal way to download DRM-protected digital music,2 but particularly in those early days the value of the iTunes Music Store to Apple was not so much that it was a selling point to consumers, but rather a means by which Apple could play dumb about how it was that its burgeoning number of iPod customers came to fill up their music libraries.
To be clear, I’m not very bent out of shape about this; the reality is that piracy was happening before Apple woke up to the music revolution, and would have continued whether the iPod came along or not.3 In fact, by offering a legal alternative that not only matched but exceeded the convenience of piracy, Apple pointed the way to a surprisingly bright future for the music labels.
What is worth noting is that Apple’s breakthrough product – the one that started Apple down the road to the iPhone, iPad, App Store, everything that contributed to yesterday’s financial results – was not simply a product of Steve Jobs vision, or Rubinstein or Tony Fadell or Jony Ive or any of the other folks at Apple.
Apple’s preference, of course, is that you stream via Apple Music, one of the key parts of Apple’s Services businesses; the “Services” line on Apple’s income statement is now the second-largest, and has loomed largest in Apple’s quarterly presentation to analysts for the last year-and-a-half.
Later that year Apple would release the iPhone 6 and reap the rewards of that advantage: Greater China quickly became Apple’s second-largest market, buying an incredible $59 billion worth of Apple products in the company’s 2015 fiscal year.4 Naturally, despite the fact Apple’s China sales have faltered with the iPhone’s increasingly stale design, services revenue has only grown; according to App Annie, App Store revenue in China surpassed App Store revenue in the United States last fall, making China the most important market for Apple’s fastest growing segment.
Tim Cook argued on Apple’s earnings call – correctly and fairly, to be sure – that in the case of removing VPN apps the company is simply following the law; of course there is no law that says Apple, contrary to the company’s behavior in other countries or markets, ought to invest $1 billion in a Chinese company competing with a Western challenger, or open R&D facilities worth $500 million when the company has been reticent for years to let technology-focused employees work in San Francisco, much less across the Pacific.
5 As for the HomePod, Cook highlighted on the earnings call that it is “Designed to work with your Apple Music subscription”; if you have a Spotify subscription and want voice control, you will have to get an Echo instead. Indeed, Apple’s attempt at services lock-in is steadily increasing: HomePod supports only Apple Music and Siri, CarPlay supports only Siri and Apple Maps, iOS still doesn’t let one change default applications.
What has always made the “Apple is doomed” argument so dumb is that it has always implied that Apple was some sort of special snowflake, incapable of leveraging its massive user base or demonstrated ability to iterate on its industry-leading products.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Should we stop keeping pets? Why more and more ethicists say yes”

The British pet industry is worth about £10.6bn; Americans spent more than $66bn on their pets in 2016.
A survey earlier this year found that many British pet owners love their pet more than they love their partner, their children or their best friend.
In 1698, for example, a Dorset farmer recorded in his diary: “My old dog Quon was killed and baked for his grease, which yielded 11lb.” However, in the 19th and 20th centuries, animals began to feature less in our increasingly urban environments and, as disposable income grew, pets became more desirable.
Veterinarian turned philosopher Bernard Rollin recalls pet owners in the 1960s putting their dog to sleep before going on holiday, reasoning that it was cheaper to get a new dog when they returned than to board the one they had. More recently several countries have moved to change the legal status of animals.
While pets remain property in the UK, the Animal Welfare Act of 2006 stipulates that pet owners must provide a basic level of care for their animals.
“There is an illusion now that pets have more voice than in the past but it is maybe more that we are putting words into their mouth,” Pierce says, pointing to the abundance of pets on social media plastered with witty projections written by their “Parents”.
For now, the argument over whether we should own animals is largely theoretical: we do have pets and giving them up might cause more harm than good.
“In the long haul, I think petkeeping might fall out of fashion; I think it is possible that robots will take their place, or maybe pet owning will be for small numbers of people. Cultural trends come and go. The more we think of pets as people, the less ethical it is to keep them.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Anonymous’ browsing data can be easily exposed, researchers reveal”

A judge’s porn preferences and the medication used by a German MP were among the personal data uncovered by two German researchers who acquired the “Anonymous” browsing habits of more than three million German citizens.
Eckert, a journalist, paired up with data scientist Andreas Dewes to acquire personal user data and see what they could glean from it.
Some were sparse users, with just a couple of dozen of sites visited in the 30-day period they examined, while others had tens of thousands of data points: the full record of their online lives.
“We often heard: ‘Browsing data? That’s no problem. But we don’t have it for Germany, we only have it for the US and UK,'” she said.
The data they were eventually given came, for free, from a data broker, which was willing to let them test their hypothetical AI advertising platform.
By creating “Fingerprints” from the data, it’s possible to compare it to other, more public, sources of what URLs people have visited, such as social media accounts, or public YouTube playlists.
Another discovery through the data collection occurred via Google Translate, which stores the text of every query put through it in the URL. From this, the researchers were able to uncover operational details about a German cybercrime investigation, since the detective involved was translating requests for assistance to foreign police forces.
So where did the data come from? It was collated from a number of browser plugins, according to Dewes, with the prime offender being “Safe surfing” tool Web of Trust.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Oliver Sacks on How Our Hobbies Can Kill Us”

Many years after his glorious moment, Sacks, crippled in a hospital bed, meets an old friend from his weightlifting days.
“I developed a pain in my lower back so intense that I could hardly move or breathe; I wondered if I had fractured a vertebra. Nothing amiss was seen on X-ray, and the pain and spasms resolved in a couple of days, but I was to have excruciating back attacks for the next forty years.”So that moment of glory cost Oliver Sacks sixty years of chronic, stabbing pain.
To break the state record, Sacks needed to move up several weight classes.
“Many times in my life, I’ve lost myself this way.
“I sometimes wonder why I pushed myself so relentlessly in weight lifting. My motive, I think, was not an uncommon one; I was not the ninety-eight-pound weakling of bodybuilding advertisements, but I was timid, diffident, insecure, submissive. I became strong - very strong - with all my weight lifting but found that this did nothing for my character, which remained exactly the same.”In those moments at the dojo, when I lost myself in the “Flow”, there was no time to think of anything else.
No time to think of work, no time to think of relationships.
Of course, no time to think of how lonely I was.
You might wake up in the night and realize that you’re lonely in your marriage, or that you need to think about what your carbon footprint is doing to the planet, but the next day you have a million little things to do, and the day after that you have another million things.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 things smart people never reveal about their personal life at work”

TalentSmart has tested more than a million people and found that the upper echelons of top performance are filled with people who are high in emotional intelligence.
Emotionally intelligent people are adept at reading others, and this ability shows them what they should and shouldn’t reveal about themselves at work.
People’s political beliefs are too closely tied to their identities to be discussed without incident at work.
Granted, different people treat politics differently, but asserting your values can alienate some people as quickly as it intrigues others.
There will always be incompetent people in any workplace, and chances are that everyone knows who they are.
A good 111% of the people you work with do not want to know that you bet they’re tigers in the sack.
The same thing happens when you tell people that you’re job hunting.
Have you seen any of the above cause trouble for people at work? Are there any others that you would add?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Artificial Light From Digital Devices Lessens Sleep Quality”

Who hasn’t snuggled up with a smart phone, tablet or watched their flat screen TV from the comfort of bed? A new study by researchers at the University of Houston College of Optometry, published in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, found that blue light emitted from those devices could contribute to the high prevalence of reported sleep dysfunction.
Results showed about a 58 percent increase in their nighttime melatonin levels, the chemical that signals your body that it’s time to sleep.
“The most important takeaway is that blue light at night time really does decrease sleep quality. Sleep is very important for the regeneration of many functions in our body,” Ostrin said.
Wearing activity and sleep monitors 24 hours a day, the 22 study participants also reported sleeping better, falling asleep faster, and even increased their sleep duration by 24 minutes a night, according to Ostrin.
Blue light boosts alertness and regulates our internal body clock, or circadian rhythm, that tells our bodies when to sleep.
Ostrin recommends limiting screen time, applying screen filters, wearing computer glasses that block blue light, or use anti-reflective lenses to offset the effects of artificial light at nighttime.
“By using blue blocking glasses we are decreasing input to the photoreceptors, so we can improve sleep and still continue to use our devices. That’s nice, because we can still be productive at night,” Ostrin said.
According to the most recent findings from the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep Health Index®, while three quarters of Americans are satisfied with their sleep over the past week, more than four in ten Americans reported that their daily activities were significantly impacted by poor or insufficient sleep at least once during the past seven days.

The orginal article.