Summary of “Motivating Employees Is Not About Carrots or Sticks”

While the concept of motivation may be straightforward, motivating employees in real-life situations is far more challenging.
Why not consider another way to motivate employees? I’d like to suggest a new dialogue that embraces the key concept that motivation is less about employees doing great work and more about employees feeling great about their work.
The better employees feel about their work, the more motivated they remain over time.
To motivate your employees, start by sharing context about the work you’re asking them to do.
What are we doing as an organization and as a team? Why are we doing it? Who benefits from our work and how? What does success look like for our team and for each employee? What role does each employee play in delivering on that promise? Employees are motivated when their work has relevance.
What might make an employee’s work difficult or cumbersome? What can you do to ease the burden? What roadblocks might surface? How can you knock them down? How can you remain engaged just enough to see trouble coming and pave the way for success? Employees are motivated when they can make progress without unnecessary interruption and undue burdens.
As tempting as it is to try to influence employee satisfaction with the use of carrots and sticks, it isn’t necessary for sustained motivation.
What aspects of your role do you enjoy? What makes you proud to lead your team? What impact can you and your team have on others both inside and outside the organization? How can you adapt your role to increase your energy and enthusiasm? Employees feel motivated when their leaders are motivated.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a Saison Dupont changed Michael Kiser’s life.”

Inspired to keep track of what beer he was trying on his business trips, Michael bought the URL to Good Beer Hunting the next day and he has been serving the beer industry ever since.
We caught up with Michael to find out how a hobby led him to become the premier tastemaker in the craft beer industry, what successful breweries have in common, and what’s next for GBH.You are a writer, photographer, industry strategist, and founder of Good Beer Hunting.
There’s some major breaking news in the beer world, or a surprise visit from a brewer and we jump into the recording room for a podcast, sales reps drop in to share their new beers, and lately we’ve been spending time with the Pitchfork team on October, a mainstream beer and entertainment site we’re running as well.
Good Beer Hunting started as your view on the craft beer scene, but has become a medium for other writers to share their objective views on the rapidly growing & changing industry.
We tell a lot of stories about craft beer, but our vision is a lot wider than just craft alone.
These breweries are far more interesting to me, and more firmly rooted in a tradition, than anything I’d call “Craft.” They get lumped in with the craft beer zeitgeist of the last ten years, but really, they’re reaching back hundreds of years as part of a much slower, more articulate idea of beer-making.
What are some developments in the industry that excite you most?Origin beers, and the crossover between beer, cider, and wine through the art of fermentation is what excites me the most.
Good Beer Hunting serves beer in multiple ways, whether it be through collaborations, strategic work with breweries, or sharing stories from all sides of the industry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Netflix’s ‘OITNB’ Leak: Larson Studios Breaks Silence”

Larson Studios president Rick Larson and his wife and business partner, Jill Larson, didn’t recognize the number that sent them these two short text messages via their personal cell phones two days before Christmas last year, so they simply ignored them.
In an exclusive interview with Variety, the Larson Studios principals are breaking their silence on an incident that threatened the existence of their family-owned audio post-production business.
Larson Studios chief engineer David Dondorf and director of digital systems Chris Unthank left their families on Christmas morning and rushed to the studio to examine the hackers’ claims.
So Larson Studios hired private data security experts to find out what had happened – and what to do next.
A few days later, the phones at Larson started to ring, with the security departments of various studios on the other end of the line.
In the email, the hackers argued that Larson Studios had broken the terms of the agreement by talking to the FBI. “So they decided to punish us.”
Larson Studios has spent months trying to mend relationships with its clients, and strengthening its security.
Work on security continues at Larson Studios, which is still undergoing audits commissioned by some of its major clients.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of Coal Country”

Once an untouched landscape of white oak and shagbark hickory, it now belonged to Consol Energy and served as the refuse area for the Bailey Mine Complex, the largest underground coal mine in the United States.
Her fight against coal mining often puts her in opposition not only to energy companies but also to miners concerned about their jobs, and he fears that someone will run her Nissan Versa off a rural road one night.
Below ground, the practice of “Long-wall” mining, which removes an entire coal seam, can crack buildings’ foundations and damage springs and wells, destroying water supplies.
When Clinton said, at a speech in Ohio, “We’re going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business,” it didn’t matter that she was laying out an economic plan for life beyond coal, or that she immediately added, “We don’t want to forget those people.” Trump, for his part, denounced “Job-killing” regulations.
During the two world wars, coal miners were often exempt from service, because their jobs were essential to the war effort, and miners retain the sense that they are risking danger to benefit their country.
Bob Murray, who owns the United States’ largest independent coal company, argued in a speech that if the mines closed “The lights will go out in this country, and people will freeze in the dark.”
Zimmerman, who worked in coal for forty years, told me, “I’ll always support miners.” But the environmental cost of coal was clear to him.
Trump complained, in his speech about the Paris accord, that under the agreement “China will be allowed to build hundreds of additional coal plants.” But China, responding to dismal air quality, has promised to close a thousand coal mines and has increased its use of renewable fuels.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A tale of two Canadas: Where you grow up affects your income in adulthood”

Of the income scale you are twice as likely to grow up to earn at least a middle-class income than if you were born to the same parents in the United States or Britain.
Far from it: While income mobility looks impressive as a national average, Dr. Corak’s data reveal that some parts of Canada – such as central Alberta and southern Saskatchewan, southwestern Ontario, the largest urban metropolitan areas such as Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto – stand out as “Mobility springboards,” where people’s adult incomes easily exceed those of their parents.
Other places – most of Manitoba outside of Winnipeg, much of coastal British Columbia – are “Mobility traps,” where people rarely move up the income ladder.
In addition to your parent’s income, the region, province, city, and even neighbourhood you grew up in can have significant and dramatic effects on your income later in life.
Choose your parents’ income rank by moving the slider to the left or right, and try out the calculator to see where you’d end up.
Those same places appear bright green on our “Rags-to-riches” map, because a very high proportion of people who grew up there ended up far higher on the income scale than their parents.
Across Canada, there are two groups of people who are much more likely than others to stay in the same income category as their parents: The poor and the very wealthy.
As a result, Canadians who live in places where average incomes are in the bottom fifth are far more likely than others to end up making no more money than their parents.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Easiest Path to Riches on the Web? An Initial Coin Offering”

Last month, a small team of computer engineers in Lithuania raised $14 million in 45 minutes by selling a coin, known as Mysterium, that is intended to give access to an encrypted online data service that is still being built.
A team in Switzerland raised around $100 million for a coin that will be used on an online chat program that has not yet been released, known as Status.
Proponents of initial coin offerings hail them as a financial innovation that empowers developers and gives early investors a chance to share in the profits of a successful new enterprise.
Last year, the first blockbuster coin offering, the Decentralized Autonomous Organization, quickly raised more than $150 million.
Underpinning the surge in initial coin offerings is a broader boom in digital money.
Mr. Sussman has also had some bad moments along the way, such as the time that he sent what would now be $100,000 worth of Ether to a scammer who put up a fake digital address for another coin offering.
Now, half a dozen of his colleagues, including his boss, have a chat room where they discuss potential coin investments.
The hope with a token like BAT is that as more people use the browser and more advertisers want the coins, the coins will become more sought after and the users will benefit from the rising price.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook’s Secret Censorship Rules Protect White Men from Hate Speech But Not Black Children”

A trove of internal documents reviewed by ProPublica sheds new light on the secret guidelines that Facebook’s censors use to distinguish between hate speech and legitimate political expression.
There is a ban against pictures of Pepe the Frog, a cartoon character often used by “Alt-right” white supremacists to perpetrate racist memes, but swastikas are allowed under a rule that permits the “Display [of] hate symbols for political messaging.” In the documents examined by ProPublica, which are used to train content reviewers, this rule is illustrated with a picture of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg that has been manipulated to apply a swastika to his sleeve.
Facebook’s director of policy for the region, Thomas Myrup Kristensen, acknowledged at the time that it “Found a small number of accounts where we had incorrectly removed content. In each case, this was due to language that appeared to be hate speech but was being used in an ironic way. In these cases, we have restored the content.”
In May, she deplored the increasingly common Facebook censorship of black activists in an article for Medium titled “Mark Zuckerberg Hates Black People.”
After a year of negotiations, Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube agreed to the European Union’s hate speech code of conduct, which commits them to review and remove the majority of valid complaints about illegal content within 24 hours and to be audited by European regulators.
Now the German government is considering legislation that would allow social networks such as Facebook to be fined up to 50 million euros if they don’t remove hate speech and fake news quickly enough.
Facebook recently posted an article assuring German lawmakers that it is deleting about 15,000 hate speech posts a month.
Worldwide, over the last two months, Facebook deleted about 66,000 hate speech posts per week, vice president Richard Allan said in a statement Tuesday on the company’s site.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Odd Things Successful People Do Over the Summer That Lazy People Do Not”

Summer is nothing more than a change in temperature-and if you live somewhere like California, then summer is even less noticeable.
Aside from a few overly hyped social gatherings, “Summer” is just another excuse people use to avoid digging in and getting to work.
Anyone who has become successful at anything will tell you that a summer well spent is one in which you were able to make great strides toward your Chief Aim.
How do successful people spend their summers? And, more important, what do they do differently from everyone else?
Remember when you were a kid and your parents used to send you to summer camp? Or remember when you would pack up the car for a long road trip? These were opportunities to get out of your comfort zone and to experience new things, but also to detox.
Successful people use their summers as an opportunity to detox.
What you’re inspired to create in the months of summer will probably not carry over into fall, and vice versa.
Summer is a great block of time to push yourself to finish something strong, so that you can enter the remaining part of the year with a fresh canvas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rise of the Thought Leader”

While public intellectuals traffic in complexity and criticism, thought leaders burst with the evangelist’s desire to “Change the world.”
Drezner seems to view this case study as a prime example of how the market for ideas regulates itself: A public intellectual checked a thought leader, popping an “Asset bubble” in the process.
The intellectual institutions of postwar America were far from perfect; universities and think tanks accepted military-oriented funding from the U.S. government and often provided the intellectual foundations for American imperialism.
Surveying this new landscape, it is clear that the true role of the thought leader is to serve as the organic intellectual of the one percent-the figure who, as Gramsci put it, gives the emerging class “An awareness of its own function” in society.
This is why the Ideas Industry, as Drezner effectively shows, favors the thought leader over the more critical, skeptical public intellectual: Academics tend “To dismiss the ‘Great Man’ theory of events.” If the marketplace of ideas is flooded with hucksters evangelizing the next big thing and the importance of billionaires for “Making the world a better place,” it is because that’s what billionaires want to hear.
Deeply the superrich have degraded American intellectual and political discourse, the Ideas Industry has also created an opening-albeit a very slim one-for a different kind of organic intellectual.
The one percent’s attempts to disrupt the media and universities have had the unintended consequence of radicalizing a generation of young writers and academics on the left-those recently dubbed “The new public intellectuals” in The Chronicle for Higher Education.
The intellectual world is an important dimension of a broader struggle; the self-serving theories and empty buzzwords of today’s thought leaders must be not only denounced but replaced with rich concepts that help all kinds of people make sense of the world as it is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Religion has no monopoly on transcendent experience”

What does one call such an experience? Pullman refers to it as ‘transcendent’.
In a survey I did in 2016, 84 per cent of respondents said they’d had an experience where they went beyond their ordinary self, and felt connected to something greater than them.
Things like my experience are by-products, not goals.
Csikszentmihalyi agrees, saying that moments of flow are ‘the kind of experience which culminates in ecstasy’.
You don’t expect a full-on ecstatic experience every time you go to a concert, museum, mountain or date.
In his classic text Varieties of Religious Experience, William James noted that surrendering to a higher power often triggered deep psychological healing and growth.
The experience of Bill Wilson, co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, is one notable example of this: after decades of struggling with alcohol dependence, he finally surrendered to a God he barely believed in: ‘Suddenly the room lit up with a great white light.
A peak experience is just a peek – we still have to put in the boring, hard work to deconstruct our egotism.

The orginal article.