Summary of “7 Exercises That Will Transform Your Whole Body in Just 4 Weeks”

Bright Side found a set of exercises that will completely transform your body in just 4 weeks.
How to do it: Plank is an isometric exercise where the rule is to hold your body correctly.
Results: If done correctly, the exercise works the abs, back, buttocks, legs, and arms.
How to do it: Stand on all fours, and stretch your left leg and right arm in a straight line.
How to do it: Place your feet shoulder-width apart, standing on your whole foot.
How to do it: Lie on your back with your arms stretched above your head and your knees bent.
Slowly raise your upper body with your arms straight, and touch your toes.
How to do it: Lie facedown on the floor with your arms bent at the elbow and placed beneath your head. Lift your upper body as far as you can.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Have an Empathy Imbalance, Not an Empathy Deficit”

1 If empathy deficits fuel social divisions, why doesn’t empathy building salve them?
Empathy is not like the volume knob on a stereo, which tunes all frequencies of a piece of music identically; it’s more like an equalizer, which boosts different frequencies by different amounts.
Rather than empathizing more or less overall-and changing the quantity of a single empathy deficit-we tune our empathy, boosting it for some while lowering it for others.
Even people who empathize a lot can still suffer from an empathy imbalance-greater empathy for people who look, think, and act like themselves and reduced empathy for those who don’t.
A person’s imbalance mattered more than their overall level of empathy.
Conflict resolution programs designed to increase overall empathy could backfire if they increase ingroup empathy in an already imbalanced situation.
The more empathy someone feels for their ingroup, the more damage they might be willing to inflict to protect it.
He is currently at work on a book, Choosing Empathy, which focuses on building empathy under difficult circumstances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 tricks I used to turn my terrible résumé around”

So I’m going to do you a favor and tell you something you probably need to hear because no one will tell you: You have a bad résumé.
Really the only thing you need to know is that a résumé is a list of your achievements, not a list of your responsibilities.
Rewrite your résumé so it’s a list of your achievements.
Your résumé might be pages of stuff like, “Responsible for blah blah blah.” Okay, no one really cares about what you were responsible for because everyone knows you had day-to-day responsibilities.
Before someone tells me I’m telling you to lie on your résumé you’re not lying here, you’re making a logical guess.
My résumé went from three pages to one page, and that was with 15 years of experience.
If you’re still thinking a longer résumé makes you look more impressive you should know that recruiters don’t care because studies show they spend about six seconds on it.
If you rewrite your résumé this way you can spend 80% of the interview telling your stories and 20% improvising.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Second Coming Of iPad”

For creatives and professionals who embraced the original 9.7-inch iPad Pro only to find themselves hamstrung by cramped keyboards and multitasking that just wasn’t quite there, the new 10.5-inch iPad Pro and the larger Smart Keyboard intended to accompany it will likely hit a sweet spot.
If the iPad Pro is indeed “The clearest expression of Apple’s vision of the future of personal computing,” as CEO Tim Cook has said, you should be able to comfortably type with it, no? At least until telepathic typing becomes an actual thing.
On the new iPad Pros they get pretty damn close, thanks to one of those world-of-pure-imagination innovations Apple is willing to spend years concocting.
This one’s called ProMotion, and it doubles the number of times per second an image can be refreshed on the the iPad Pro’s display.
Like most all mobile devices, the first-generation iPad Pro had a refresh rate of 60Hz. The new iPad Pro can ramp up to a refresh rate of 120Hz that’s more typical of 4K TVs. What that means in practice is that anything that moves on the device’s screen – whether it be video or a line drawing or a photo zoom – appears smoother and more detailed.
For Federighi, who’s had a hand in a broad array of Apple innovations since his return to the company in 2009, ProMotion is a dramatic upgrade to the iPad Pro.
iOS 11 promises to do a good job of that for iPad. It may not be the “PadOS” – an iPad-specific operating system – for which some folks have argued, but it’s got a groaning board of thoughtful iPad features.
It’s hard not to look at the new 10.5-inch iPad Pro running iOS 11 and recall that “The computer for the rest of us” slogan Apple used in 1984 to launch the Mac.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Wells Fargo’s Cutthroat Corporate Culture Allegedly Drove Bankers”

Once upon a time, in 1970, long before America’s banking system was dominated by six giant institutions-JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley-Dennis Hambek started working as a messenger at the National Bank of Washington in Ellensburg, Washington.
In Kovacevich’s lingo, bank branches were “Stores,” and bankers were “Salespeople” whose job was to “Cross-sell,” which meant getting “Customers”-not “Clients,” but “Customers”-to buy as many products as possible.
Guitron soon discovered there was no shortage of internal publications that advised Wells employees on how to conduct themselves, including the Wells Fargo Code of Ethics and the Wells Fargo Team Member Handbook, which warned if an employee engaged in “Manipulating or misrepresenting sales [gaming] in an attempt to meet sales goals or receive compensation” immediate termination could result.
Julie Tishkoff, an administrative assistant to a Wells Fargo regional president, said, according to her discrimination complaint, that around the same time, in 2005, she observed “Fraudulent banking practices,” including bank employees’ “Forging customer signatures and fraudulent[ly] opening accounts for customers without their knowledge or consent” and soliciting elderly or otherwise vulnerable customers to take out lines of credit even though they didn’t understand the product.
In the fall of 2013, David Douglas filed a lawsuit against Wells Fargo and three local employees, alleging that Wells bankers had opened eight accounts he didn’t want or know about, funding them with money from his legitimate accounts.
He saw things: bankers changing customers’ phone numbers in the system so, if they complained, no one could get in touch with them; online banking accounts for elderly customers who didn’t know how to use computers.
“What has mystified everybody and anybody, what other bank managements have asked me, is why, when the L.A. Times story hit, did you not rip the place apart and find out who was pushing these practices?” asks Nancy Bush, a bank analyst who has covered Wells Fargo for over three decades.
Wells Fargo’s new C.E.O. is Tim Sloan, who spent most of his career not in the retail bank working with consumers but rather catering to big business clients before becoming C.F.O. and then C.O.O. Sloan is clearly not a break with the past as a former Wells Fargo executive says, “He is a very different guy” from Stumpf.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The insane lengths the ultra-rich go to spoil their kids at summer camp”

During a recent visiting day at her three children’s sleepaway camp in Maine, “Odd Mom Out” creator and star Jill Kargman watched as parents brought out the big guns in an all-out-battle for public affection, Upper East Side-style.
For some parents, it’s not enough to send their kids away to lavish rural retreats.
“There might have been a rumor that somebody gave iPod shuffles to every girl in the bunk one year,” a director of an all-girls camp in New York coyly told The Post.
The camp banished the tradition five years ago after gifts became too excessive.
Leslie Venokur, founder of Big City Moms, a parenting Web site, sends her 8-year-old daughter, Sami, to Camp Pontiac in the Berkshires.
The third-season premiere of Kargman’s show, airing 10 p.m. July 12 on Bravo, centers around the absurdities of camp visiting day.
Parents shell out thousands of dollars for customized camp gear ranging from $100 splatter-painted sleeping bags to $175 Uggs with their children’s name spray-painted on.
“They’ll put dryer sheets between each layer of clothes, so when they come to camp, it smells good. And they’ll put a nice gift on top, too,” she says of the new trend of a “Trunk gift.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Being open-minded literally changes the way you see the world”

Recent studies suggest that personality traits don’t simply affect your outlook on life, but the way you perceive reality.
One study published earlier this year in the Journal of Research in Personality goes so far as to suggest that openness to experience changes what people see in the world.
In the study, researchers from the University of Melbourne in Australia recruited 123 volunteers and gave them the big five personality test, which measures extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience.
Though the research suggests that personality affects the way we filter conscious experience, it’s not clear exactly how this process works.
While studies show that personality can shift over time, there’s currently little research on whether perception also changes to correspond with new personality traits.
Given the above cited evidence that meditation can shift perception, Antinori believes the way we see the world may well change in line with personality.
“It may be possible that a change in people’s personality may also affect how they see the world,” she says.
Mounting evidence suggests that our personalities are affecting our experience of the world in more ways than we realize.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is How To Be More Self-Aware: 5 Secrets From Research”

In one study of more than 13,000 professionals in financial services, technology, nursing, and more, researchers found almost no relationship between self-assessed performance and objective performance ratings.
They’re more creative, more confident, and better communicators.
They’re more effective leaders with more enthusiastic employees.
They even lead more profitable companies some research has even shown that self-awareness is the single greatest predictor of leadership success.
In a few cases, he found the opposite: the more time the participants spent in introspection, the less self-knowledge they had. In other words, we can spend endless amounts of time in self-reflection but emerge with no more self-insight than when we started.
If you really want to get to know yourself better, do it like a good researcher would: spend less time theorizing and more time collecting data points to see patterns and trends.
A true commitment to ongoing learning- saying to ourselves, the more I think I know, the more I need to learn- is a powerful way to combat knowledge blindness and improve our effectiveness in the process.
Reflect less, notice more: Your calendar and your credit card bill will tell you more about who you really are than that story you’re spinning in your head. Ask “What” not “Why”: “Why” is for philosophers and whiners.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Theresa May wants to ban crypto: here’s what that would cost, and here’s why it won’t work anyway / Boing Boing”

If you want to secure your sensitive data either at rest – on your hard drive, in the cloud, on that phone you left on the train last week and never saw again – or on the wire, when you’re sending it to your doctor or your bank or to your work colleagues, you have to use good cryptography.
What Theresa May thinks she’s saying is, “We will command all the software creators we can reach to introduce back-doors into their tools for us.” There are enormous problems with this: there’s no back door that only lets good guys go through it.
For Theresa May’s proposal to work, she will need to stop Britons from installing software that comes from software creators who are out of her jurisdiction.
The commercial operators – Apple and Microsoft – might conceivably be compelled by Parliament to change their operating systems to block secure software in the future, but that doesn’t do anything to stop people from using all the PCs now in existence to run code that the PM wants to ban.
Virtually all academic security work in the UK must cease – security research must only take place in proprietary research environments where there is no onus to publish one’s findings, such as industry R&D and the security services.
All packets in and out of the country, and within the country, must be subject to Chinese-style deep-packet inspection and any packets that appear to originate from secure software must be dropped.
Existing walled gardens must be ordered to ban their users from installing secure software.
Proprietary operating system vendors must be ordered to redesign their operating systems as walled gardens that only allow users to run software from an app store, which will not sell or give secure software to Britons.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s Strengths and Weaknesses – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

The idea of Apple existing at the intersection of technology and liberal arts was central to the late Steve Jobs’ conception of Apple and, without question, a critical factor when it came to Apple’s success: at a time when technology was becoming accessible to consumers and their daily lives Apple created products – one product, really, the iPhone – that appealed to consumers not only because of what it did but how it did it.
At the same time, Messages will never reach the dominance of a service like WeChat because it is limited to Apple’s own platforms – as it should be! Messages is the canonical example of how strengths and weaknesses are two sides of the same coin: it is Messages exclusivity that allows it to be a lock-in, and it is that same exclusivity that limits the standalone value.
Peppered throughout Apple’s presentation were seemingly small features like new compression algorithms that depend on Apple controlling everything from Messages to the camera to the processor that makes it all work.
More fundamentally, all of Apple’s services are intrinsically limited by the fact that they exist to sell Apple hardware: those services, and the teams that work on them, will never be the most important people in the company, and their development will be constrained by the culture of Apple itself.
As a user both are very welcome; strategically, both features follow from the fact that Apple makes money on its hardware, while companies like Google, Facebook, and other online businesses rely on advertising and the collection of data.
The fundamental problem remains that for productivity apps in particular it is necessary to monetize your best customers over time; Apple has improved the situation, particularly with the addition of subscription pricing and de facto trials, but hasn’t made any moves to support trials or upgrade pricing for paid apps, despite the fact that is the proven successful model for productivity applications on the Mac.
This point is part and parcel with all of the above: Apple’s strengths derive from the fact it sells software-differentiated hardware for a significant margin, which allows for exclusive apps and services set as defaults, deep integration from chipset to API, a focus on privacy, and total control of the developer ecosystem.
This, broadly speaking, is the challenge for Apple moving forward: in what other categories does its business model create an advantage instead of a disadvantage? What existing needs can be met with a superior user experience, or what new needs – like the previously unknown need for wireless headphones that are always charged – can be created? To be clear, the iPhone is and will continue to be a juggernaut for a long time to come; indeed, it is so dominant that Apple could not change the underlying business model and resultant strengths and weaknesses even if they tried.

The orginal article.