Summary of “The secret lives of millionaire tech engineers who ‘rest and vest'”

AP. The most open secret in Silicon Valley is called “Resters and vesters,” or “Coasters” – which refers to engineers who get paid big bucks without doing too much work, waiting for their stock to vest.
“At Facebook the OGs we know got DE,” this former Facebook engineer said of engineers who worked at the company before it went public.
Facebook declined to comment, but several engineers told us Facebook had a reputation of requiring long hours from its engineers.
“They are senior engineers and don’t work hard. They know the Google system, know when to kick into gear. They are engineers, so they optimized the performance cycles of their own jobs.”
While other tech companies “Sear” a product’s ship date into their engineers, who work nights and weekends to hit that date, “At X, people think, ‘If my project is canceled, oh well, I’ll just find another project,'” he said.
We’ve been told rest-and-vest engineers can be found at all of these companies.
Rest-and-vest engineers can wind up spending years “Never shipping anything,” the X engineer said.
“These engineers are highly, highly paid, but there is no other company that will take them,” he says.

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Summary of “Tell Me What You Did Today, And I’ll Tell You Who You Are”

How close to your values and goals are your living?
If you are to really accomplish your goals and dreams, how much differently would your regular day need to be than today was?
What activities must happen daily for you to live exactly how you want to be living? You may have several things in the way of your ideal day right now, but are you getting closer?
If you were to consistently live your ideal day, where would you be in one year from now? Where would you be in five years?
Self-evaluation: determines how well we are performing comparative to our goals.
Self-reaction: determines how we think and feel comparative to our goals.
Loads of research has sought to determine: How do you keep people striving for a goal when they’re struggling to stay motivated?
How you spend each day is a clear indicator of who you are and who you will become.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Internet Is Built for Advertisers”

The internet has been awash in ads for decades, but in the past few years, a shift has taken place.
“As analytics proved the inefficacy of ads, costs came down. Publishers made up for this by adding more ads, including pop-ups, interstitials, and autoplay videos,” Hanson O’Haver wrote for The Outline.
O’Haver published his piece in April, and since then, new and impressively annoying ways to shove ads into the internet have been introduced.
While the number of ads in its News Feed may be close to “Hitting a ceiling,” Facebook plans to jack up its prices and find “New slots for ads in videos and its messaging apps.” Facebook will also soon turn up the volume on its autoplay ads to make them harder to ignore.
Ads aren’t just defacing the internet, they are warping it.
The explanation for the obsession with video is simple: Advertisers will pay more to promote their products in video format than they will for in-article ads.
“Brands prefer to buy ads against video content than text, the thinking being that consumers are more likely to sit down and pay attention to an ad when it precedes a video they want to watch than they would be if the ad simply appears next to an article they’re reading,” New York magazine’s Brian Feldman explained in a postmortem about MTV’s pivot.
As the internet expanded at a galloping pace and then a full-on sprint, from academic and governmental research tool to newfangled communication hub to the very scaffolding of modern life, it underwent seismic changes, and the introduction of ads was vital to how it grew.

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Summary of “The Legend of Yanda”

He recognized then what Yanda could not: The rookie had what it took to be “One of the good ones.” The pair spent only one year together, but Yanda seized on every moment he could to mine Ogden for advice.
One such pointer was internalizing what a player had to do to earn the right to spend the offseason where he pleased, and by his fifth NFL season, Yanda finally felt comfortable doing just that.
It was in the middle of “Hawkeye country,” as Yanda puts it, and most Saturdays were spent watching head coach Hayden Fry’s Iowa teams on the living room TV. Yanda dreamed of one day playing in Kinnick Stadium, but poor grades forced him to attend North Iowa Area Community College directly after high school.
With his hopes of playing at his dream school dwindling and nothing to lose, Yanda decided to take control of his future.
The quintessential Marshal Yanda play happened in Week 13 of the 2014 season, during the second quarter of a 34-33 loss to the Chargers.
Before his fourth campaign, it seemed as if Yanda would finally get the chance to play his desired guard spot full time.
The difference these days is that now Yanda is the Pro Bowl fixture Baltimore’s young players try to emulate.
While Yanda may never be a famous face around the league, that hasn’t stopped his legend from spreading: The stars about whom fans will tell tales for years to come will do the same about Marshal Yanda.

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Summary of “What Neymar world record move means for Barcelona PSG UEFA FFP more”

It’s either a bold, game-changing move from Paris Saint-Germain or a colossal blunder by folks with more money than sense or, perhaps, something in between.
On the pitch, Barcelona can likely reload pretty quickly without Neymar.
The bottom line is that Barcelona won before Neymar’s arrival, they won with Neymar and they’ll likely win again without him.
He’ll certainly earn more at PSG but it likely won’t be “Move-the-needle” type more.
If PSG can’t afford Neymar without breaching the requirements, we’ll find out.
It’s just that we won’t know until the fall of 2018, when seasons 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 are cumulatively assessed, whether PSG violated FFP rules, which dictate that no more than $35.6m can be lost over three seasons, though some expenses and revenues aren’t included in the FFP calculation.
Throw in his wages and you’re looking at north of $100m which, while still a frightening number – Messi is costing Barcelona half of that – is possibly more manageable if you’re smart with your sales and you squeeze out commercial revenue properly.
You don’t need to be an economist to know that it’s OK to spend more if you’re earning more money; Barcelona’s revenues, for example, have gone up nearly 70 percent in the last seven years.

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Summary of “A Brutal Truth About Following Your Passion and Doing What You Love That Few People Admit”

Probably the most common career advice is “Do what you love!” People love hearing it, even though it’s all wrong – except under very specific circumstances.
“Telling someone to follow their passion can be disastrous,” says Cal Newport, author of So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Search for Work You Love.
It’s easy to confuse a hobby or interest for a profound passion that will result in career or business fulfillment.
So if you think there is a market for your passion – meaning people will pay you for it – that is enough to get you started.
Then doing the work, and working as hard as you can to improve your skills, will give you the feedback you need.
One day you wake up realizing that you’re doing what you love – and getting paid to do it.
“That’s the passion mindset. Instead focus on the value you produce through your work: how your actions are important, how you’re good at what you do, and how you’re connected to other people.”
Doing work you love, over the long-term, requires getting paid to do what you love – which means being good enough at something other people value enough to pay you for it.

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Summary of “Email-etiquette rules every professional should know”

Despite the fact that we’re glued to our reply buttons, career coach Barbara Pachter says plenty of professionals still don’t know how to use email appropriately.
Pachter says to pay careful attention when typing a name from your address book on the email’s “To” line.
“It’s easy to select the wrong name, which can be embarrassing to you and to the person who receives the email by mistake,” Pachter says.
“My name is Barbara. I don’t like receiving emails addressed as ‘Hi Barb,'” Pachter says.
In a professional exchange, it’s better to leave humor out of emails unless you know the recipient well.
The cardinal rule: Your emails should be easy for other people to read. “Generally, it is best to use 10- or 12-point type and an easy-to-read font such as Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman,” Pachter advises.
As the endless string of email hacks prove, every electronic message leaves a trail.
Whether you’re cc’ing a client on an email where your boss said something about them or including a coworker on an email chain where another coworker shares personal information, “No one likes to have someone else decide to cc someone without being asked first,” Rosalinda Oropeza Randall, an etiquette and civility expert and the author of “Don’t Burp in the Boardroom,” tells Business Insider.

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Summary of “Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky’s daily scheduling routine”

Brian Chesky needs to be ruthlessly efficient with his time.
Chesky is the CEO of Airbnb, now valued at $31 billion, and he’s currently overseeing its transformation into a full-blown travel service.
Chesky explained his technique to Greylock investor and LinkedIn founder and chairman Reid Hoffman for an episode of Hoffman’s podcast “Masters of Scale.”
Make a list of everything you want to accomplish that day.
Ask yourself for each group: What one action takes care of all of these? “It’s like a game of leverage,” Chesky said.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.
Chesky’s strategy is similar to the way “Shark Tank” investor Barbara Corcoran grades all of her personal and business tasks.
She gives each point a letter grade from A to F, and then makes a list of only the As. Then, she gives each of those a grade, with a much tougher lens, and she only works toward accomplishing the ones that get the final A grade.

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Summary of “When Will the Tech Bubble Burst?”

Not since the advent of railroads incited market booms in the 1830s and 1840s has the world seen back-to-back booms like the dot-com bubble of the 1990s and the one we are in now.
Only a few select technology companies – mainly the internet giants – are trading close to the valuations of the dot-com era, when the average price-to-earnings ratio for tech companies hit 50.
The average ratio for that sector today is 18.However, the scale of today’s tech boom is not readily visible because much of the investment action has moved into the hands of big private players.
In part to avoid that red tape, this year only 11 tech companies have gone public.
If signs emerge that the privately owned unicorns are faltering, the value of publicly owned tech companies is not likely to hold up either.
The tech giants are seen today as monopolizing internet search and commerce, and they are angling to take over industries such as publishing and automobiles, raising alarms at antitrust agencies in Europe and the United States.
Fear that new internet technologies are doing more to waste time and brainpower than to increase productivity has already provoked a backlash in China, where officials recently criticized online gaming as “Electronic heroin.” A regulatory crackdown on tech giants as either monopolies or productivity destroyers could pop the allure of tech stocks.
The dot-com boom was driven in part by increasingly optimistic predictions for technology company earnings, and it imploded when earnings started to miss badly.

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Summary of “China and the US are battling to become the world’s first AI superpower”

“Right now, AI is a two-horse race between China and the US.” And, says Mullen, China has all the ingredients it needs to move into first.
It all invites the trillion-dollar question: in the coming AI Race, can China really beat the US? Strength in numbers To build great AI, you need data, and nothing produces data quite like humans.
“If you’re using technology that’s one year old, you’re outdated. And I definitely find that in China – at least, my community in China – is very adept at taking on these risks.”
A report from the White House in October 2016 noted that China now publishes more journal articles on deep learning than the US, while AI-related patent submissions from Chinese researchers have increased 200 percent in recent years.
Scott, who started working in machine learning 10 years ago with Microsoft, suggests that China has a particularly open AI community.
In some ways, China’s July policy paper on AI mirrors this one, but China didn’t just go through a dramatic political upheaval that threatens to change its course.
The Chinese policy paper says that by 2020 it wants to be on par with the world’s finest; by 2025 AI should be the primary driver for Chinese industry; and by 2030, it should “Occupy the commanding heights of AI technology.” According to a recent report from The Economist, having the high ground will pay off, with consultancy firm PwC predicting that AI-related growth will lift the global economy by $16 trillion by 2030 – with half of that benefit landing in China.
Scott, who has worked in the field in both the US and China, says the countries have more in common than they think.

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