Summary of “Why octopuses are building small “cities” off the coast of Australia”

The first time that divers discovered a “City” of octopuses off the coast of Australia, it seemed like a fluke.
In 2016, divers found another community of octopuses living in dens built from discarded shells.
Researchers now suspect octopuses have been building group habitats for a long time.
These octopuses only live for about three years, so each generation is relatively short.
Over the years, octopuses pushed these mounds against the rocks, burrowed inside, and created dens next to each other.
Using video footage from divers and camera traps, the scientists were able to observe the social behavior of city slicker octopuses.
Building Octlantis might also put the octopuses in danger, since they have to come out of hiding to pile up shells and create burrows.
According to the researchers, Octlantis residents also regularly engage in social behavior that humans have never witnessed between octopuses before.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Teach Employees Skills They Don’t Know They Lack”

After spending billions of dollars a year on corporate learning, U.S. companies probably assume that their employees have the knowledge and skills they need to carry out their jobs.
One global technology company my team works with, for example, discovered that, on average, its sales employees didn’t understand or know about 22% of its product features, even though they believed they did.
It’s often more prominent among experienced staff, which is particularly problematic because, as the go-to people in their circles, they often pass incorrect or incomplete information and skills on to others via to peer-to-peer learning and training.
How does a company, manager or individual employee correct a competency gap about which no one is aware? As a physician who studies brain function, biological variation and how people learn, I have some suggestions.
Corporate training programs need to be redesigned to better engage learners and empower them to admit what they don’t know.
Better learning models are instead adaptive-that is, molded to each person’s needs by probing what they know and don’t know, then offering tailored content as the learner performs well or struggles.
When corporate learning programs prompt employees to admit to that they’re guessing in the same way, they, too, begin to see the previously hidden gaps in their skills and knowledge.
With a mindful approach that allows learners to probe their knowledge, uncover what they don’t know, and admit when they are unclear, incompetence is uncovered and, thus, no longer unconscious: Employees know what they don’t know and their employers can do something about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Disaster Prep: 10 Things You Should Absolutely Have In A Go Bag”

This piece will focus on what to have in a go bag – a pack prepped for when you need to get out of the house within seconds.
You don’t need to do it perfectly; you just need to do it.
Depending on the kind of emergency, you’ll need your ID to access bank accounts and claim other assets you hold.
Cash After a disaster, no one will be able to take your credit card, but you’ll need money for food, fuel, transport, and more.
Then you’ll need a smart, portable way of purifying water.
If trapped, you’ll need to signal rescue workers without losing your voice or expending precious energy.
Don’t skimp on this part of your prep; if you need it, you’ll really need it.
Food You’ll likely work hard during an evacuation-you may need to walk for miles and overcome obstacles.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Switzerland Became The Silicon Valley Of Robotics”

The Alpine nation is now “The Silicon Valley of robotics,” according to Chris Anderson, chief executive of 3D Robotics.
The key personnel and technologies of Deepmind, the artificial intelligence firm acquired by Google for $500 million just four years after its formation, emanate from Lugano IDSIA Lab, a research institute ranked in the world’s top ten for AI. Switzerland has emerged as a serious competitor to California for the technologies, people and funding that will power the world’s fourth socio-economic revolution.
Ranked for the past seven years as the world’s most innovative country by Cornell, the World Intellectual Property Organization and the INSEAD business school in Paris, the nation has also been selected by accountants KPMG as the world’s best-prepared country for long-term change – a measure highly relevant for robotics and automation pioneers who seek to shake up the societal status quo.
With only 8.5m people, Switzerland has the world’s highest proportion of peer-reviewed scientific publications in relation to its population.
Its infrastructure also includes a growing presence of firms specialising in blockchain technology, which as well as being used for financial technology, now features heavily in e-government, smart contracts, swarm robotics, collective artificial intelligence and applications for retail.
The Swiss city of Lausanne has also recently been chosen as the European base of Rewired, a robotics-focused venture studio and fund that believes that improving sensory capabilities will unlock the next-generation of smart robotics and is investing in applied science and technologies that advance machine perception.
It plans to expand into East Asia and the U.S. The venture is investing $100 million in applied science and technologies that advance machine perception on the thesis that improving machine perception will unlock the next generation of smart robotics.
Rewired’s advisers include Thomas Estier, a Switzerland-based serial robotics entrepreneur who has worked on projects for the European Space Agency.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Curious Life of an Extra, From ’30 Rock’ to ‘The Good Wife'”

Stand-ins are hired based on body type, skin tone, hair color, and height; they’re meant to match an actor for lighting and camera set-ups.
As the actor rehearses a scene, the stand-in watches, then goes through the motions for the camera and lighting departments while the actor gets hair, makeup, and wardrobe touchups.
Did the actor drop a file? Start to dance? Open a door with their left or right hand? A stand-in mimics each detail.
To get there, I had to find a way to join one of the two actors’ unions.
My first steady stand-in gig was on the show Royal Pains for the actress Jill Flint; then I landed a full-time job on The Good Wife, standing in for Julianna Margulies.
I worked on The Good Wife for five seasons, and even during its yearly hiatuses I found opportunities on other TV series and films, having cultivated a reputation for showing up to work on time and working well with the crew.
I didn’t want to be an actor, but corporate life had lost its luster for me too, and I liked learning about this industry from the bottom up.
The work of an extra or a stand-in may not be front-and-center in the way that a director or starring actor’s is, but it’s an integral part of any production, and helps provide a livelihood for many people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony Makes The Thunder Whole”

At first glance, Sam Presti and the Thunder pulling off yet another surprising trade – this time swapping Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott and a second-round pick for 10-time All-Star Carmelo Anthony – seems like fool’s gold.
There’s only one ball, and Anthony, Paul George and reigning MVP Russell Westbrook all used prolific amounts of it last season: Anthony had a usage rate of 29.1 percent, his lowest in a decade but still a top-20 figure in the league.
Anthony isn’t what he once was and his Knicks haven’t made the playoffs since 2013; George’s Indiana Pacers and Westbrook’s Thunder washed out in the first round.
Unlike most teams adding star players to a modest roster, there’s a template in the team’s recent history for how the fit might go: The Kevin Durant-led 2015-16 Thunder went up 3-1 on the Golden State Warriors in the conference finals.
Anthony had an effective field goal rate of 58.6 percent on catch-and-shoot jumpers last season, better than known sharpshooters like Kevin Love and in the top half of players with at least 200 attempts.
The Thunder didn’t just address their need for shooters – they course-corrected their recent tendency to address shooting deficiencies with players who can only shoot, Anthony Morrow or Alex Abrines.
The Thunder rotation was already perilously thin, and trading Kanter and McDermott for Anthony replaces two young players with a 33-year-old forward.
So the fact that Anthony and George carried their respective offenses with fairly limited rosters should mean that Roberson, Grant and other role players can focus on their strengths rather than their deficiencies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Answer to N.F.L. Viewers’ Prayers: Tony Romo, the Play Predictor”

“Some games, with other broadcasters, even after the play, it seems like they have no clue what happened,” said Billy Howell, 32, a Jets fan from North Carolina.
Romo is already adept at calling for replays and teaching viewers about what happened on the previous play.
After Cincinnati scored an easy touchdown, Romo explained that responsibility for picking up the running back coming out of the backfield belonged to two linebackers.
Such a moment happens a dozen times during a Romo broadcast.
Brent Musburger, the longtime ESPN and ABC broadcaster who retired last year, speculated that Romo will lose his keen understanding of teams’ tendencies the longer he’s out of uniform.
Brentmusburger finally got a chance to watch a game with Tony Romo in the broadcast booth.
Collinsworth, who last played in 1988, as a wide receiver, does not think football has evolved all that much since he was playing, suggesting that Romo’s ability to call plays will not diminish the longer he is out of league.
An article on Sunday about the N.F.L. announcer Tony Romo misspelled the surname of one of Mr. Romo’s critics.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mindfulness Isn’t the Answer to Everything. Here’s When It Helps”

While mindfulness doesn’t necessarily work the way the hype proclaims, there are some things that a good mindfulness practice can really help with.
The tricky thing about trying to interpret research about mindfulness is that many studies that claim great things for mindfulness are less rigorous than others, even though they may be peer reviewed.
University of Wisconsin neuroscientist Richard Davidson and I used the most rigorous scientific standards to sift through the sea of publications on mindfulness and other kinds of meditation.
The gold-standard studies that we identified show that there is less mind wandering and distractibility among those who practice regular mindfulness routines.
Since instituting a morning group mindfulness session that is similar to the exercise described above, the team gets along better, reacting less strongly to minor conflicts.
Many sports teams now incorporate mindfulness into their training as a way to better harmonize their playing.
Here’s the bottom line: While you shouldn’t believe everything you hear about mindfulness, there are payoffs from a meditation habit.
Think of mindfulness as a way to enhance certain kinds of mental fitness, just as regular workouts at the gym build physical fitness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jimmy Iovine: Apple Music ‘Not Even Close’ to Success With Streaming”

“I don’t believe that what exists right now is enough.” Jimmy Iovine, who runs Apple Music – originally Beats, the music service and electronics business that he and co-founder Dr. Dre sold to Apple for $3 billion in 2014 – is on a tear about the deficiencies of streaming services, ­including his own.
Apple Music tells Billboard that it now counts well over 30 million ­paying ­subscribers, helping fuel a 17 percent revenue jump for the U.S. recorded-music business in the first half of 2017 over the same period a year ago, according to the RIAA. Meanwhile, Goldman Sachs issued a report in August predicting that ­subscription streaming would drive the global record business to nearly triple to $41 billion by 2030.
The veteran record executive – who got his start sweeping out recording studios, later produced hit records for acts from Bruce Springsteen to U2, and then co-founded Interscope Records, which he ran until 2014 – is working to crack what he sees as the music industry’s biggest challenge: how to inject enough “Soul” into subscription streaming services so that fans will pay $10 a month instead of listening to their tunes on free services, which are also growing fast.
To do it, he’s relying on BBC Radio 1 ­veteran Zane Lowe, now creative ­director and L.A. anchor for Apple Music’s free radio service Beats 1, and Apple Music head of content Larry Jackson, a former A&R ­executive at Interscope and other labels.
Apple, which has about 800 million iTunes ­customers around the world, has more levers to pull: The company recently started promoting Apple Music ­subscriptions more heavily through ads and on its iTunes Store, where it began selling 99-cent singles in 2003.
The trio is also hoping for changes to the way Billboard ­calculates its charts – where a free stream on YouTube counts equally to a paid stream on Apple Music – which could ­incentivize artists and labels to promote their music on higher-paying platforms, rather than racking up free streams to win the No. 1 slot.
Can Apple do more to drive customers to Apple Music?
Everybody likes Apple Music and wants it to ­happen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When you split the brain, do you split the person?”

In so-called ‘split-brain’ patients, the corpus callosum – the highway for communication between the left and the right cerebral hemispheres – is surgically severed to halt otherwise intractable epilepsy.
What happens to the person? If the parts are no longer synchronised, does the brain still produce one person? The neuroscientists Roger Sperry and Michael Gazzaniga set out to investigate this issue in the 1960s and ’70s, and found astonishing data suggesting that when you split the brain, you split the person as well.
If you fixated on one point, then everything to the left of that point was processed by the right hemisphere, and everything to the right of your fixation point was processed by the left hemisphere.
The left hemisphere controlled the right side of the body and language output, while the right hemisphere controlled the left side of the body.
If you split the person when you split the brain, that leaves little room for an immaterial soul.
To try to get to the bottom of things, my team at the University of Amsterdam re-visited this fundamental issue by testing two split-brain patients, evaluating whether they could respond accurately to objects in the left visual field while also responding verbally or with the right hand.
When a stimulus appeared in the left visual field, the patient was better at indicating its visual properties, and when a stimulus appeared in the right visual field, he was better at verbally labelling it.
You split the brain into two halves, and yet you still have only one person.

The orginal article.