Summary of “Hokusai: the Great Wave that swept the world”

Had Katsushika Hokusai died when he was struck by lightning at the age of 50 in 1810, he would be remembered as a popular artist of the ukiyo-e, or “Floating world” school of Japanese art, but hardly the great figure we know today.
His late blooming was spectacular – it was only in his 70s that he made his most celebrated print series, Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji, including the famous Great Wave, an image that subsequently swept over the world.
In their observation and invention they have been compared to Rembrandt and Van Gogh, and rightly so for the thrilling panorama they provide both of the world and of Hokusai’s imagination.
Hokusai gradually introduced colour into the series, delicate pinks and darker shadows, to show the illumination of the world as the sun creeps up over the horizon.
That the Great Wave became the best known print in the west was in large part due to Hokusai’s formative experience of European art.
I would love to see an impression of Hokusai’s delicately coloured print hung next to Géricault’s Raft of the Medusa, painted just over a decade previously, in which a similar large wave is about to crash down on frail humanity.
Hokusai signed his Thirty-Six Views with the name Iitsu, adding for clarification that he was “The former Hokusai”.
The drawings are brilliantly conceived, and the prints beautifully made, the woodblock carvers reproducing Hokusai’s line so accurately that we think we are looking at the drawings themselves, rather than carved and printed copies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s no shame in a $100M startup”

Tech journalists want to write stories about companies that spell million with a “B.” Investors at billion-dollar funds want to deploy $50 million into winning companies, and $100 million exits are seen as consolation prizes instead of reasons to cheer.
Y Combinator’s Paul Graham is one of the most influential venture capitalists of the last 10 years, yet his startup Viaweb sold for “Just” $49 million.
Belittling $100M success stories Not only is selling a company for $100 million often scoffed at by VCs, at times it is outright mocked by the startup community.
The disdain for “Small” $100 million sales is so strong there’s even an Urban Dictionary entry for selling your startup for too little money – it’s called “Pulling a Patzer.” No seriously, go look it up.
You might have a company with $10 million last year in gross revenue that earned a $50 million valuation in its last round.
In a normal environment, that company might raise $20 million on an $80 million pre-money valuation as the next step up.
With only $10 million in revenue and very thin margins, the company has sold its option of a $500 million exit.
In some cases, selling for tens of millions of dollars can be more lucrative for founders than selling for hundreds of millions, or even billions of dollars.

The orginal article.

Summary of “John Grisham’s Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Popular Fiction”

This necessitates the use of a dreaded device commonly called an outline.
Writers waste years pursuing stories that eventually don’t work.3.
DO – WRITE YOUR ONE PAGE EACH DAY AT THE SAME PLACE AND TIME.Early morning, lunch break, on the train, late at night – it doesn’t matter.
Find the extra hour, go to the same place, shut the door.
DON’T – WRITE A PROLOGUE.Prologues are usually gimmicks to hook the reader.
DON’T – KEEP A THESAURUS WITHIN REACHING DISTANCE. I know, I know, there’s one at your fingertips.
There are three types of words: words we know; words we should know; words nobody knows.
DO – READ EACH SENTENCE AT LEAST THREE TIMES IN SEARCH OF WORDS TO CUT.Most writers use too many words, and why not? We have unlimited space and few constraints.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple Is Working on a Dedicated Chip to Power AI on Devices”

The chip, known internally as the Apple Neural Engine, would improve the way the company’s devices handle tasks that would otherwise require human intelligence – such as facial recognition and speech recognition, said the person, who requested anonymity discussing a product that hasn’t been made public.
“Two of the areas that Apple is betting its future on require AI,” said Gene Munster, former Apple analyst and co-founder of venture capital firm Loup Ventures.
Apple devices currently handle complex artificial intelligence processes with two different chips: the main processor and the graphics chip.
The new chip would let Apple offload those tasks onto a dedicated module designed specifically for demanding artificial intelligence processing, allowing Apple to improve battery performance.
Should Apple bring the chip out of testing and development, it would follow other semiconductor makers that have already introduced dedicated AI chips.
The Apple AI chip is designed to make significant improvements to Apple’s hardware over time, and the company plans to eventually integrate the chip into many of its devices, including the iPhone and iPad, according to the person with knowledge of the matter.
The company is also said to discuss updated laptops with faster chips from Intel Corp. An AI chip would join a growing list of processors that Apple has created in-house.
It has since released dedicated processors to power the Apple Watch, the motion sensors across its products, the wireless components inside of its AirPods, and the fingerprint scanner in the MacBook Pro.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple Park’s Tree Whisperer”

The encounter would lead to Muffly becoming the senior arborist at Apple, Inc., in charge of choosing, locating and planting the 9,000 trees that justify Apple’s choice to call its 175-acre campus a park - and in making Apple Park a leaf-and-blossom tribute to the CEO who designed it but would not live to see it built.
Muffly had come to the Cupertino office not long after receiving a cold call on his phone while working a $125 job pruning lemon trees in a Menlo Park backyard.
“That’s what I’ve been doing - planting fruit trees, oak trees,” he said.
“There was a kind of tree that I wanted to use and one that was more common,” says Muffly.
Because the trees they plant might well live a century or more, Muffly suggested they use native trees as the backbone of the ecosystem and then diversify to other oak genetics.
When Jobs presented his plan to the Cupertino City Council in June 2011, he said that Apple would add to the 3,700 existing trees for a total of 6,000.
Muffly looked at the redwoods at some abandoned Christmas tree farms up on Skyline, but the soil was too rocky to grow them to Apple’s specifications.
“So I sent all my little tree elves to help me, telling them we need big trees we can transport to the site. Next thing I know we’re finding these in two abandoned Christmas tree farms in the Mojave Desert, Yermo, and Adelanto. Who knew there were Christmas tree farms in the Mojave?” Apple actually bought the Yermo site.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Oldest Homo sapiens bones ever found shake foundations of the human story”

Fossils recovered from an old mine on a desolate mountain in Morocco have rocked one of the most enduring foundations of the human story: that Homo sapiens arose in a cradle of humankind in East Africa 200,000 years ago.
Hublin said the extreme age of the bones makes them the oldest known specimens of modern humans and poses a major challenge to the idea that the earliest members of our species evolved in a “Garden of Eden” in East Africa one hundred thousand years later.
Today, the Neanderthals are considered a sister group that lived alongside, and even bred with, our modern human ancestors.
“When we found the skull and mandible I was emotional. They are only fossils, but they have been human beings and very quickly you make a connection with these people who lived and died here 300,000 years ago.”
In the first of two papers published in Nature on Wednesday, the researchers describe how they compared the freshly-excavated fossils with those of modern humans, Neanderthals and ancient human relatives that lived up to 1.8m years ago.
“The idea is that early Homo sapiens dispersed around the continent and elements of human modernity appeared in different places, and so different parts of Africa contributed to the emergence of what we call modern humans today,” he said.
Lee Berger, whose team recently discovered the 300,000 year-old Homo naledi, an archaic-looking human relative, near the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage site outside Johannesburg, said dating the Jebel Irhoud bones was thrilling, but is unconvinced that modern humans lived all over Africa so long ago.
“But Jessica Thompson, an anthropologist at Emory University in Atlanta, said the new results show just how incredible the Jebel Irhoud site is.”These fossils are the rarest of the rare because the human fossil record from this time period in Africa is so poorly represented.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millennials endanger casual-dining restaurants”

Brands such as TGI Fridays, Ruby Tuesday, and Applebee’s have faced sales slumps and dozens of restaurant closures, as casual-dining chains have struggled to attract customers and increase sales.
“Casual-dining restaurants face a uniquely challenging market today,” Buffalo Wild Wings CEO Sally Smith recently wrote in a letter to shareholders.
According to Smith, these sit-down restaurants’ struggles can be blamed on a frequently besmirched generation: millennials.
“Millennial consumers are more attracted than their elders to cooking at home, ordering delivery from restaurants, and eating quickly, in fast-casual or quick-serve restaurants,” Smith wrote.
While blaming millennials has become a trend to the point of cliché in retail, Smith isn’t wrong to zero in on younger customers’ changing tastes as a major factor in casual dining’s downfall.
Grocery chains are increasingly competing with restaurants, thanks to lower prices and perks such as pick-up and delivery, new technology, and trendy features like wine bars and to-go meals.
While delivery clearly is a compelling option to offer, it isn’t a simple service for restaurants to add.
More convenient chains have also drawn millennial customers away from casual-dining options.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Financial independence is easier when you know which choices can slow you”

Financial independence is easier when you know which choices can slow you.
Speeding toward financial independence is easier when you know which financial choices can slow you down.
I spoke to a handful of top financial advisers to get their takes on the most common financial choices their clients live to regret.
That’s because interest rates are still teetering near lows, says Colorado financial adviser Matthew Jackson of Solid Wealth Advisors LLC. Even one percentage point can cost you – or save you – tens of thousands of dollars in interest over the years.
Buying more house than you need can lead to regret and financial stress, says Vancouver, Wash., financial planner Alex Whitehouse.
“Millennials often ask if it’s okay to access their 401(k) or IRA early to buy a home, travel or pay off debt,” says Minnesota financial adviser Jamie Pomeroy of FinancialGusto.com.
The more money you have saved later in life, the more flexibility you’ll have, notes fee-only San Diego financial adviser Taylor Schulte.
If you wait long enough, you may not even be able to buy it at all, says New York financial planner Joseph Carbone of Focus Planning Group.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Thad Matta Didn’t Get the Goodbye He Deserved”

Thad Matta is the greatest basketball coach in Ohio State history.
Three seasons later, Matta landed one of the greatest recruiting classes in Big Ten history, won 35 games, and came one victory shy of delivering the school its first men’s basketball national championship since 1960.
Things were likely going to get worse for Matta before they got better, and knowing that, his unceremoniously and graciously stepping down during an abrupt afternoon press conference in June seems like a happier ending than Ohio State dragging him out of his office by his ankles next March on the heels of another season in which the Buckeyes struggled to crack.
I’d just like to mention that the only reason people care so much about Ohio State basketball making a sudden coaching change is because Matta made them care.
Matta wasn’t just a good coach for a guy at a football school, and he wasn’t just a good coach for the Big Ten.
Mike Conley, D’Angelo Russell, Evan Turner, and tons of other former Buckeyes still regularly call Matta for advice, as does Greg Oden, who told me that Matta is often the first and/or only call he makes when at a crossroads.
Truth be told, while the alum and fan in me hoped that Matta would coach the Buckeyes forever, the friend in me wanted him to retire five years ago.
In the 10 years I’ve known him, Matta has often brought up how his dream is to suddenly walk away from it all and open a beach bar in Mexico.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Look at the Benefits of a Systematic Approach to Life”

Habits, not goals, make otherwise difficult things easy.
The purpose of a well-crafted set of habits is to ensure we reach our goals with incremental steps.
All our life, so far as it has definite form, is but a mass of habits – practical, emotional, and intellectual – systematically organized for our weal or woe, and bearing us irresistibly toward our destiny, whatever the latter may be.
Once a habit becomes ingrained, it can last for life.
Reap an action; sow an action, reap a habit; sow a habit, reap a character; sow a character, reap a destiny.
“First we make our habits, then our habits make us.”- Charles C. Nobel.
By switching our focus from specific goals to creating positive long-term habits, continuous improvement can become a way of life.
For further reading on this topic, look to Drive: The Surprising Secret of What Motivates Us, How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, and The Power of Habit.

The orginal article.