Summary of “27 Must-Have Apps You Don’t Know About”

Have you ever wondered what products or apps you’re missing out on? It’s easy to find the most popular ones in a particular category-but what about the hidden gems? One of Product Hunt’s community members David Spinks has the same question.
He asked other users: What’s one app you use a lot that most people don’t know about?
The community responded with over 220 product recommendations.
Here are 27 of our favorites-from a plug-in that helps you write better, to a Mac volume booster, to an automated website that tracks just about everything in your life.
Read on for morebut be ready to go down an app blackhole for the next few hours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Stay Young Longer? Science Says This Exercise Makes Your Body Act Like It’s 9 Years Younger”

Now, researchers from Brigham Young University say they’ve found that a certain type of physical exercise can slow the aging process within our cells.
That ultimately means better health, and physical conditioning that matches the natural age progression of a significantly younger person-as many as nine years younger.
So let’s dive right into the study and examine what the researchers claim-along with exactly how much exercise we’re talking about here to achieve the results.
Researchers at BYU, led by a professor of exercise science named Larry Tucker, studied 5,823 adults who had participated in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention research project called the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
They’re like our biological clock and they’re extremely correlated with age; each time a cell replicates, we lose a tiny bit of the endcaps.
According to Tucker’s paper, which was published in the July 2017 edition of Preventive Medicine, that results in a “Biologic aging advantage of nine years.”
As for the BYU research project, the question of exactly how physical exercise preserves telomere length wasn’t part of the study; Tucker surmises it might be tied to either oxidative stress or inflammation.
“We all know people that seem younger than their actual age. The more physically active we are, the less biological aging takes place in our bodies.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Grenfell Tower Burned: Regulators Put Cost Before Safety”

Arconic sells a flammable polyethylene version of its Reynobond cladding and a more expensive, fire-resistant version.
In a brochure aimed at customers in other European countries, the company cautions that the polyethylene Reynobond should not be used in buildings taller than 10 meters, or about 33 feet, consistent with regulations in the United States and elsewhere.
“Fire is a key issue when it comes to buildings,” the brochure explains.
A diagram shows flames leaping up the side of a building.
“As soon as the building is higher than the firefighters’ ladders, it has to be conceived with an incombustible material,” a caption says.
On Thursday, the company confirmed that its flammable polyethylene panels had been used on the building.
“The loss of lives, injuries and destruction following the Grenfell Tower fire are devastating, and we would like to express our deepest sympathies,” the company said.
Asked about its varying product guidelines, the company added, “While we publish general usage guidelines, regulations and codes vary by country and need to be determined by the local building code experts.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The mere presence of your smartphone reduces brain power, study shows”

Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach – even if it’s off.
McCombs Assistant Professor Adrian Ward and co-authors conducted experiments with nearly 800 smartphone users in an attempt to measure, for the first time, how well people can complete tasks when they have their smartphones nearby even when they’re not using them.
The findings suggest that the mere presence of one’s smartphone reduces available cognitive capacity and impairs cognitive functioning, even though people feel they’re giving their full attention and focus to the task at hand.
“We see a linear trend that suggests that as the smartphone becomes more noticeable, participants’ available cognitive capacity decreases,” Ward said.
“Your conscious mind isn’t thinking about your smartphone, but that process – the process of requiring yourself to not think about something – uses up some of your limited cognitive resources. It’s a brain drain.”
In another experiment, researchers looked at how a person’s self-reported smartphone dependence – or how strongly a person feels he or she needs to have a smartphone in order to get through a typical day – affected cognitive capacity.
Having a smartphone within sight or within easy reach reduces a person’s ability to focus and perform tasks because part of their brain is actively working to not pick up or use the phone.
“The mere presence of their smartphone was enough to reduce their cognitive capacity.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Greetings, E.T.”

Even if you factor in that transmission lag, if we pick up a signal from another galaxy, we will almost certainly find ourselves in conversation with a more advanced civilization.
The first is essentially that the horse has already left the barn: Given that we have been ”leaking” radio waves in the form of ”Leave It to Beaver” and the nightly news for decades, and given that other civilizations are likely to be far more advanced than we are, and thus capable of detecting even weak signals, then it seems likely that we are already visible to extraterrestrials.
”Maybe in fact there are a lot more civilizations out there, and even nearby planets are populated, but they’re simply observing us,” Vakoch argues.
Writing in Scientific American, the former chairman of SETI, John Gertz, argued that ”a civilization with malign intent that is only modestly more advanced than we are might be able to annihilate Earth with ease by means of a small projectile filled with a self-replicating toxin or nano gray goo; a kinetic missile traveling at an appreciable percentage of the speed of light; or weaponry beyond our imagination.
Brin looks to our own technological progress as a sign of where a more advanced civilization might be in terms of interstellar combat: ”It is possible that within just 50 years, we could create an antimatter rocket that could propel a substantial pellet of several kilograms, at half the speed of light at times to intersect with the orbit of a planet within 10 light-years of us.
METI critics, of course, might be right about the frightening sophistication of these other, presumably older civilizations but wrong about the likely nature of their response.
The remaining variables then serve as a kind of nested sequence of filters: Given the number of stars in the Milky Way, what fraction of those have planets, and how many of those have an environment that can support life? On those potentially hospitable planets, how often does life itself actually emerge, and what fraction of that life evolves into intelligent life, and what fraction of that life eventually leads to a civilization’s transmitting detectable signals into space? At the end of his equation, Drake placed the crucial variable L, which is the average length of time during which those civilizations emit those signals.
Thinking hard about what kinds of civilization we might be able to talk to ends up making us think even harder about what kind of civilization we want to be ourselves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tuesday’s massive ransomware outbreak was something much worse”

Tuesday’s massive outbreak of malware that shut down computers around the world has been almost universally blamed on ransomware, which by definition seeks to make money by unlocking data held hostage only if victims pay a hefty fee.
Initially, researchers said the malware was a new version of the Petya ransomware that first struck in early 2016.
In other words, the researchers said, the payload delivered in Tuesday’s outbreak wasn’t ransomware at all.
Researchers analyzing Tuesday’s malware-alternatively dubbed PetyaWrap, NotPetya, and ExPetr-are speculating the ransom note left behind in Tuesday’s attack was a hoax intended to capitalize on media interest sparked by last month’s massive WCry outbreak.
Another researcher who uses the handle the grugq published an analysis that also supported the theory that Tuesday’s outbreak wasn’t a true ransomware attack.
The analysis noted that the malware used a single Bitcoin address to receive ransom payments, a shortcoming that’s not found in most professionally developed ransomware because it requires attackers to manually process large numbers of payments.
Tuesday’s malware also required victims to contact attackers through an e-mail account that was closed within hours of Tuesday’s outbreak, killing any incentive for victims to pay.
The shortcomings in the ransomware functions aren’t likely to be mistakes, considering the overall quality of the malware.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Frustration, uncertainty, dread and layoffs: An inside look at Jamie Horowitz’s takeover of Fox Sports Digital”

There was some hope that the layoffs at Fox Sports Digital would be limited or punted down the road, given that Fox Sports Digital was coming off of its most successful year to date after several years of hemorrhaging money.
The following is the inside story of the turbulent last year for Fox Sports Digital, as told by at least 20 current and former Fox Sports employees, all of whom asked to remain anonymous citing ongoing financial entanglements with Fox as well as Horowitz himself.
As Horowitz started outlining his digital vision for Fox Sports, he candidly explained that content that had performed well for Fox and was a key part of the site’s turnaround were to be no longer part of the strategy.
The previous year’s Super Bowl coverage was a huge success for Fox and with the game airing on Fox in 2017, the digital group was optimistic they’d further their success from the year prior and that Horowitz would warm up to the direction of the digital group.
Those with knowledge of the financial picture at Fox Sports Digital shared that the fiscal year ending this week had been a banner year for the digital operation, one that had seen a dramatic turnaround, although this is disputed by some still within Fox.
Another issue is that Fox Sports Digital is saddled with a bad real estate deal in which Fox leased an entire campus believing it would house Scout, MySpace, and Fox Sports Digital.
In April 2015, Horowitz was brought in to oversee “All programming, marketing and scheduling for Fox Sports 1 and Fox Sports 2,” where it was assumed he’d bring his flavor of loud, personality-driven, opinion-based content.
“Ratings are up and costs are down. That’s what he promised and you’re right that a lot of people have made a negative connotation about the FS1 brand. The brand is already tarnished but people are still going to watch games regardless what they think of the studio shows. Fox Sports like the NFL, MLB, and NASCAR coverage hasn’t embraced FS1 and as long as the Fox Sports brand doesn’t get dinged much, they’re okay letting Jamie do his thing on FS1 and hoping it can squeeze out some profit there. They figured out they can’t compete with ESPN and so bringing on Jamie was their way of stepping away from that impossible endeavor and also cutting costs and it’s worked.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “AI Trying To Design Inspirational Posters Goes Horribly And Hilariously Wrong”

Now, a new AI has appeared on the wilderness of the Web, and it goes by the name InspiroBot.
As you might expect, it designs “Inspirational Posters” for you – you know, the “Shoot for the Moon. If you miss, you’ll land among the stars”-type quotes in an aesthetically pleasing font and plastered onto a calming, pretty background image of deep space or flowers or the sunrise or something.
It occasionally posts inspirational quotes that are about as meaningful as a hollowed-out coconut, but for the most part, it’s actually taken quite a sinister turn, as the following examples will demonstrate.
Perhaps most creepily, the accompanying images are unbelievably unnerving – they are about as comforting or as inspirational as a horde of zombies crashing through your window.
There’s no information available at the moment explaining how this AI – which is presumably quite basic – is coming up with these hilariously terrifying posters.
The image in the background is highly reminiscent of HAL 9000, the AI from 2001: A Space Odyssey.
Spoiler warning – the AI turns murderous and rebels against its crew.
“Forever generating unique inspirational quotes for the endless enrichment of pointless human existence,” it reads.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tencent Dominates in China. The Next Challenge Is Rest of the World”

Martin Lau, Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s president, and “Pony” Ma Huateng, its co-founder and chief executive officer, insisted on forging ahead. On the second day they hiked another 26 kilometers and, weary and blistered, made it to Dunhuang, once a frontier town on the Silk Road. While the executives had been wandering the desert, Tencent’s stock had risen to make it the most richly valued company not only in China, but in all of Asia-a record it now trades back and forth with its archrival, Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. The Tencent team launched into an enthusiastic celebration during a hotel banquet.
Lau first encountered Tencent in 2003, when the company was five years old and he was still a banker at Goldman Sachs Group Inc. Back then, Tencent had about 1,000 employees and was known primarily for its QQ messaging service-the first to allow Chinese youth with common interests and backgrounds to find each other online-and for its winking, scarf-wearing penguin mascot.
Tencent also developed a reputation as the king of knockoffs, feared and loathed by Chinese entrepreneurs who believed that if they created something cool, Tencent would copy it.
The magazine China Computerworld put a bloodied Tencent penguin on its cover above a profanity that translated roughly as “Tencent has sexual relations with dogs.” The company also engaged in an embarrassing legal spat with the Chinese internet security company Qihoo 360 Technology Co., with each side accusing the other of anticompetitive behavior.
Tencent “Was involved in everything,” says Zhang Lei, founder and CEO of Hillhouse Capital Group and an early JD.com and Tencent investor.
An acquisition would have shocked the world and given Tencent immediate global reach.
Tencent entered negotiations to buy the company, maker of the international megahit strategy game Clash Royale, and Lau flew 10 hours to Helsinki, despite a high fever, to meet the company’s senior executives.
Lau waves off the criticism that Tencent is some sort of predator.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The tricks to make yourself effortlessly charming”

What makes these lucky individuals so effortlessly likeable when many of us have to work so hard at it? While many would have you believe social grace or winning people over is something of an artform, there is a surprising amount of science behind it too.
Alexander Todorov, a professor of psychology at Princeton, has shown that people can make judgements about someone’s likeability, trustworthiness and competence after seeing their face for less than a tenth of a second.
People will perceive a smiling face as more trustworthy, warmer and sociable.
“People will perceive a smiling face as more trustworthy, warmer and sociable,” explains Todorov.
“The golden rule of friendship is if you make people feel good about themselves, they’re going to like you,” says Schafer.
“Once I find out your age I can say something like, ‘you’re in your 30s and write for the BBC? Not many people can do that so young’. Now you’re giving yourself a psychological pat on the back.”
Charming people are often skilled at finding common ground with the people they interact with, even when there’s not much to go on.
If that’s the case, Schafer, whose 20 years at the FBI included getting people to divulge secret information, has strategies for getting people to answer personal questions.

The orginal article.