Summary of “How Did the Climate Apocalypse Become Old News?”

The New York Times has done admirable work on global warming over the last year, launching a new climate desk and devoting tremendous resources to high-production-value special climate “Features.” But even their original story on the wildfires in Greece made no mention of climate change – after some criticism on Twitter, they added a reference.
Over the last few days, there has been a flurry of chatter among climate writers and climate scientists, and the climate-curious who follow them, about this failure.
In perhaps the most widely parsed and debated Twitter exchange, MSNBC’s Chris Hayes – whose show, All In, has distinguished itself with the seriousness of its climate coverage – described the dilemma facing every well-intentioned person in his spot: the transformation of the planet and the degradation may be the biggest and most important story of our time, indeed of all time, but on television, at least, it has nevertheless proven, so far, a “Palpable ratings killer.” All of which raises a very dispiriting possibility, considering the scale of the climate crisis: Has the end of the world as we know it become, already, old news?
The news about what more to expect, coming out of new research, only darkens our picture of what to expect: Just over the past few weeks, new studies have suggested heat in many major Indian cities would be literally lethal by century’s end, if current warming trends continue, and that, by that time, global economic output could fall, thanks to climate effects, by 30 percent or more.
When you think about it, this would be a very strange choice for a producer or an editor concerned about boring or losing his or her audience – it would mean leaving aside the far more dramatic story of the total transformation of the planet’s climate system, and the immediate and all-encompassing threat posed by climate change to the way we live on Earth, to tell the pretty mundane story of some really hot days in the region.
As NPR’s science editor Geoff Brumfiel told Atkin, “You don’t just want to be throwing around, ‘This is due to climate change, that is due to climate change.'”.
Wildfires are “Not caused by climate change” only in the same way that hurricanes are not caused by climate change – which is to say they are made more likely by it, which is to say the distinction is semantic.
They won’t be, and the longer-view story is much more harrowing: not just more months like July, but an unfolding century when a month like this July has become a happy memory of a placid climate.

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Summary of “Northern Spain road trip: pull over for pintxos”

The road from San Sebastián to A Coruña is one of big cities, pretty fishing towns, high cliffs and raging sea.
Stay a few minutes from the old town and its narrow streets and pintxo bars at arty Hotel Okako.
If your wallet can bear it, try Michelin-starred Nerua, with menus from €80 a head, inside Frank Gehry’s masterpiece.
For something cheaper, swing by La Viña del Ensanche, a 90-year-old bar serving excellent pintxos and wine.
While staying at Le Petit Boutique Hotel take a stroll down El Sardinero beach, and catch a ferry to Playa de Somo across the bay, to enjoy fine views of the city.
For food, Diluvio in the city centre is excellent or try pintxo specialist Casa Lita on seafront Paseo de Pereda.
Saunter around the harbour drinking freshly poured Asturian cider and trying local delicasy percebes – goose barnacles.
For a welcoming atmosphere and classic, unpretentious food, try O Bebedeiro or Taberna de Cunqueiro.

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Summary of “Marine Biologist Bitten by a Crocodile Featured on Shark Week”

In April, Márquez was filming a program for the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week programming in the Cuban archipelago Jardines de la Reina.
The incident was depicted on the Shark Week documentary Cuba’s Secret Shark Lair, which aired on Monday.
MARQUEZ: The irony is: I was bitten by a crocodile during Shark Week.
We were really really privileged and really lucky to get to go to this beautiful place.
Crocodiles will either bite down harder, and then I would start feeling pain, and then: There goes all my rational thinking, really.
The medic, came up, got his medic bag, and opened up my brand new scuba suit, which I was really sad about.
I got some really strong antibiotics, which did save my leg from any further infection, but also really, totally, royally screwed over my stomach lining.
I’ve still got two of the really deep bite wounds that are still open and slowly closing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The emotionally intelligent way to resolve disagreements faster”

What should you do? What you should’ve done much earlier: Find something-anything-to agree on, as long as it’s meaningful.
You might agree with your senior engineer’s concerns and say to her, “I agree. It would make a lot of sense to get real user testing at this stage on our basic features before we put a lot more energy into other things. Let’s find a way to do that without a public launch. I need to also make sure we protect the brand experience.”
When you find a way to agree with something other than the solution to the problem you’re debating, you can shift the frame of the conversation to include a factor you both see as true and relevant.
Not only does finding something to agree on fulfill both of these psychological needs, but research also suggests that people tend to automatically reciprocate.
Wait, though: What if agreeing makes you look like a pushover? What if the other person really is to blame for something-will you be letting them get away with it? And if you give a little ground, won’t they just take more? These are all important concerns.
The fact is that they remain liabilities whether or not you find something in their argument to agree with; acknowledging common ground doesn’t totally invalidate your argument.
You can agree and remain very strong about what matters to you.
Agreeing tends to bring out the best in other people, but it can also bring out the best in you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Big tech warns of ‘Japan’s millennium bug’ ahead of Akihito’s abdication”

The Japanese calendar counts up from the coronation of a new emperor, using not the name of the emperor, but the name of the era they herald.
Akihito’s coronation in January 1989 marked the beginning of the Heisei era, and the end of the Sh?wa era that preceded him; and Naruhito’s coronation will itself mark another new era.
For one, Akihito has been on the throne for almost the entirety of the information age, meaning that many systems have never had to deal with a switchover in era.
For another, the official name of Naruhito’s era has yet to be announced, causing concern for diary publishers, calendar printers and international standards bodies.
Steele warned coders of what to look out for: “Some algorithms attempting to count the years during a transition year may not consider the possibility of two partial Japanese Calendar years, in two different Calendars Eras, within the same Gregorian year,” for instance.
Since Japanese computers use one character to represent the entire era name, Unicode needs to set the standard for that new character.
The era system doesn’t only pose problems during an imperial transition.
Many older computers, with aspects dating back to before the end of the Sh?wa era in 1989, have never been updated to reflect the new era, and still think the year is Sh?wa 93.

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Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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Summary of “‘Saving Private Ryan’ and Spielberg’s Grim View of Heroism”

A persistent fascination in Spielberg’s career is the symbolic weight Americans can assign figures like Private Ryan, who is one of millions sent to fight abroad but suddenly becomes something much more-a man who deserves saving because of the losses his family suffered.
While those are both films in which a small good is done to combat an unfathomable evil, in Saving Private Ryan it’s hard to tell what’s really being accomplished.
The film was released just as the new studio that Spielberg co-founded, DreamWorks, was beginning to find its legs in the market, and it was the highest-grossing domestic movie of 1998.
Spielberg’s historical films-like Munich, War Horse, Lincoln, and Bridge of Spies-have the same conflicted viewpoint as Saving Private Ryan, full of admiration for the people at their center, but wondering at the ultimate value of their sacrifice.
Throughout Saving Private Ryan, Miller’s company frequently note the unfairness of eight people being sent to rescue one.
By the end of the movie, most of Miller’s group has died in battle, though Ryan is indeed saved, and told by Miller to “Earn” their sacrifice.
It’s so well crafted that it dominates most cultural conversation about Saving Private Ryan, which is also best remembered for losing Best Picture to Shakespeare in Love at that year’s Oscars.
In the rest of the film’s nearly three-hour running time, Spielberg is wrestling with the ways that heroism was stretched, distorted, and at times destroyed by the horrors of the war.

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Summary of “Zach Lowe on the Chicago Bulls, Jabari Parker and Lauri Markkanen”

Jabari Parker doesn’t want to hear how the Bulls, in Year 2 of a rebuild after a slapdash ending to the Derrick Rose and Jimmy Butler eras, will have problems finding touches for all their score-first young guys.
Chicago is hoping Parker channels his edge into the sort of all-around effort that could bring balance to a young roster light on defense, playmaking, and overall hoops IQ. They already know the jewel of that core, Lauri Markkanen, plays with a swagger that frankly surprised them.
Markkanen can really shoot, and the threat he presents off the ball gives him confidence Chicago can make it work with Zach LaVine, Kris Dunn, Parker, and Markkanen jostling for touches.
The Bulls still ended up with Wendell Carter Jr. at No. 7, and they are thrilled with his potential as an Al Horford-style fulcrum who makes plays in space – a perfect frontcourt partner for Markkanen.
When Parker and Markkanen man the forward positions, lots of opponents will try to arrange things so that a wing defends Markkanen – leaving a bulkier player on Parker.
Markkanen is adding weight in anticipation of playing more center – a look Hoiberg likes, even though Chicago hemorrhaged points in that alignment last season.
With LaVine locked into one wing spot, most rival executives would have recommended Chicago shift away from Parker – and use his slot to take unwanted salary from Denver, along with the Nuggets’ 2019 first-round pick.
If Parker disappoints, the Bulls can decline their option on him for 2019-20.

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Summary of “Terms of Service Violation”

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