Summary of “Turkey’s Financial Crisis Shows the Risks of Strongmen”

During ErdoÄŸan’s first decade in power, Turkish growth surged, inflation fell, and per capita income multiplied.
The U.S. and other democracies embraced ErdoÄŸan as a rising power and promising partner on the international stage.
The more concentrated power gets, the more unaccountable it becomes.
The result, unsurprisingly, is that while strongman regimes can be successful for a while, sometimes dazzlingly so, they usually end up reproducing the problems they were supposed to solve.
This dynamic has been particularly evident in Turkey in recent months, as ErdoÄŸan-who has long espoused unconventional ideas about monetary policy-repeatedly thwarted the central bank from enacting the interest-rate hikes that might have quelled the financial crisis before it reached critical proportions.
The bank at last succeeded two weeks ago in sharply raising rates, but doubts about its independence remain-fanned not least by ErdoÄŸan himself, who framed the rate increase as a grudging concession that he might withdraw at any time.
Fans of strongman regimes elsewhere will argue that Turkey’s upheaval reflects the peculiar personality of ErdoÄŸan and therefore does not implicate their own preferred leaders, who are invariably described as more restrained, thoughtful, and disciplined.
The problems bedeviling Turkey aren’t random or accidental.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lakes are bubbling and hissing with a dangerous greenhouse gas, methane, as the Arctic thaws”

Katey Walter Anthony has studied some 300 lakes across the tundras of the Arctic.
The volume of gas wafting from it could deliver the climate system another blow if lakes like this turn out to be widespread. The first time Walter Anthony saw Esieh Lake, she was afraid it might explode – and she is no stranger to the danger, or the theatrics, of methane.
In 2010, the University of Alaska at Fairbanks posted a video of the media-savvy ecologist standing on the frozen surface of an Arctic lake, then lighting a methane stream on fire to create a tower of flame as tall as she is.
Arctic lakes that don’t freeze Walter Anthony, who grew up close to Lake Tahoe, was captivated by Arctic lakes at 19, when she spent a summer at Siberia’s picturesque Lake Baikal.
A week before the trip, Walter Anthony had published a major study delivering worrisome news about Arctic lakes in general.
That’s despite the fact that the lakes would cover less than 6 percent of the total Arctic land surface.
Later, after processing his data, he produced an initial estimate that the lake was producing two tons of methane gas every day – the equivalent of the methane gas emissions from about 6,000 dairy cows.
Some scientists say they’re not sure yet how bad Arctic lakes will be for the climate or whether they will indeed cause emissions from permafrost to double.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A history of the oxo good grips peeler”

One of the most important moments in the history of industrial design occurred in 1990, when the kitchen brand OXO defied the traditional, knuckle-bleeding tools of culinary tradition, and released its Good Grips line.
To this day, these tools are the best articulation of the potential of inclusive design: Developed for people with arthritis, Good Grips had thick rubbery handles that were also better tools for everyone to use.
Created by Smart Design, in conjunction with OXO International’s launch in 1990, it raised the bar for accessible consumer products, and changed the way kitchen tools were designed forever.
Nearly three decades after its release, it maintains 4.8 stars out of 5 on Amazon yet still costs under $10. How many consumer products are truly that lasting? It’s why the peeler won our inaugural Timeless Design award as part of Innovation by Design 2018.
Over the years, abridged versions of the peeler’s origin story have been shared in design museums and even business schools.
We couldn’t design something for people just with special needs, because it would have to be in a special catalog, and no one is able to have access to those products.
We had to design a handle that would work for various uses.
We’ve been living this for so long-but the OXO line was universal design, or inclusive design, long before either had a name.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘We’re moving to higher ground’: America’s era of climate mass migration is here”

The era of climate migration is, virtually unheralded, already upon America.
“Including all climate impacts it isn’t too far-fetched to imagine something twice as large as the Dustbowl,” said Jesse Keenan, a climate adaptation expert at Harvard University, referencing the 1930s upheaval in which 2.5 million people moved from the dusty, drought-ridden plains to California.
The closest analogue could be the Great Migration – a period spanning a large chunk of the 20th century when about 6 million black people departed the Jim Crow south for cities in the north, midwest and west.
There are established migration preferences for some places – south Florida to Georgia, New York to Colorado – but in many cases people would uproot to the closest inland city, if they have the means.
Pilkey’s new book – Sea Level Rise Along Americas Shores: The Slow Tsunami – envisions apocalyptic scenes where millions of people, largely from south Florida, will become “a stream of refugees moving to higher ground”.
Those living near the coasts will face pressures of the gradual as well as dramatic nature but people inland will also be harried to move by climate change.
Further to the south, at the border, there are suggestions that people from Central America are being nudged towards the US because of drought and hurricanes in their homelands, part of a trend that will see as many as 300 million climate refugees worldwide by 2050.
“People can usually cope with being a little less comfortable, but if you see repeated storms or severe damage to crops, that will trigger change,” said Solomon Hsiang, who researches how climate change will affect society at the University of California.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Banana slicers and pre-peeled oranges: “useless” products can help people with disabilities”

Help may also take a human face: Personal care assistants, aides, home health attendants, and other direct service professionals are vital, though there’s also a heavy social expectation that family members provide unpaid caregiving labor, a practice many people with disabilities oppose along with other exploitative labor practices.
Kim Sauder, a disability scholar and advocate, notes that people with disabilities may not want to be forced to wait for help with tasks like peeling oranges; there’s something very dehumanizing about the thought of just wanting a snack and being stymied by a rind you can’t remove on your own.
Many people with disabilities complain that these assessments tend to understate the amount of care they need, taking a “Budget-driven” approach.
Some of the most useful products for people with disabilities weren’t developed with them in mind Products like the banana slicer, pizza shears, or similar items, says Hartley, can be especially useful for people who can’t safely or comfortably use knives.
These universal design practices are something people with disabilities are aware of.
People with disabilities themselves often end up filling the gaps for those who haven’t or can’t access professional services.
Sauder notes, for example, that a tweet making fun of peeled and packaged oranges has gained notoriety multiple times, even after people with disabilities have criticized the sentiment behind the original “Joke.” Each time it pops up in Sauder’s timeline under a new name, it goes viral all over again.
It’s not just that people with disabilities have a use for items like these and are tired of hearing that they’re wasteful or silly: When the need for such products is called into question, it can exacerbate social divides that contribute to larger policy issues that keep people with disabilities from public life, whether it’s the frenzied call for straw bans, claims that complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act is too onerous, or applying work requirements to Medicaid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Margaret Sullivan thinks about tech CEOs buying media companies.”

What should we make of these tech titans turned media patrons, and should we worry about their intentions? To figure that out, we recently interviewed Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan on If Then, Slate’s technology podcast.
Can you help us understand what this means, to have tech executives buy media companies? Is there something that we really need to be thinking about here?
Margaret Sullivan: Well, I can talk about it directly as being an employee of the Washington Post, which is owned by Jeff Bezos, and it’s been a very, very positive thing for the Post.The Post was, I think you could say it was troubled as lot of newspapers were, and was really trying to be a local newspaper and Bezos has sort of switched that around, so that the Post has very big national and even global ambitions.
So I think that there’s a potential upside there for legacy companies that are trying to figure out what to do in the post-print world.
If you look at the history of media ownership, it’s certainly not a new thing to have business magnates or billionaires coming in and buying a media empire partly as a vanity project-that’s not necessarily a bad thing.
How do the Washington Post’s business reporters think about their obligations when Bezos is their owner, even if he’s not standing at their side saying, write this, don’t write that? There must still be an imaginary Bezos on their shoulder when they’re covering his company.
“But I think that certainly covering the news and looking a step further is not at all frowned on or impossible to do.” – Margaret Sullivan.
So do these tech executives expect to eventually make money, do you think? And if and when the rubber meets the road on that, could things still go awry?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Too Much Apple Cider Vinegar Bad for You? A Doctor Weighs In”

Our friends and colleagues will regale us with stories of the healing power of apple cider vinegar for whatever problem we may have just mentioned.
As a practicing physician and professor of medicine, people ask me about the benefits of drinking apple cider vinegar all the time.
A few examples are that of the famous Greek physician Hippocrates, who recommended vinegar for the treatment of cough and colds, and that of the Italian physician Tommaso Del Garbo, who, during an outbreak of plague in 1348, washed his hands, face, and mouth with vinegar in the hopes of preventing infection.
The most reliable evidence for the health benefits of vinegar come from a few humans studies involving apple cider vinegar.
One study demonstrated that apple cider vinegar can improve after-meal blood glucose levels in insulin-resistant subjects.
In 11 people who were “Pre-diabetic,” drinking 20 milliliters – a little more than one tablespoon – of apple cider vinegar lowered their blood sugar levels 30 to 60 minutes after eating more than a placebo did.
Is There Any Harm in It?Is there any evidence that vinegar is bad for you? Not really.
Unless you are drinking excessive amounts of it, or drinking a high acetic acid concentration vinegar such as distilled white vinegar used for cleaning, or rubbing it in your eyes, or heating it in a lead vat as the Romans did to make it sweet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How One of Hitler’s Favorite Works of Art Got Stolen-Twice”

On December 12, 1976, the performance artist Ulay walked into the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, snatched Carl Spitzweg’s “The Poor Poet” off the wall, and ran out the emergency exist with the framed painting slung under his right arm, alarms blaring behind him.
It’s all fun and performance art until a painting actually gets stolen.
Writing on “The Poor Poet’s” second-and currently final-theft, Hagen and Hagen explain that the thieves were motivated by “The painter’s extraordinary popularity in Germany, where a survey of people’s favorite paintings revealed”The Poor Poet” in second place, behind Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa and in front of Albrecht Durer’s Hare.”.
Given Spitzweg’s high profile as a German artist and his romanticized take on German life, it is perhaps no surprise that Hitler-a famously failed artist himself-took a shine to the late local hero.
Spitzweg is thought to have been one of Hitler’s favorite artists.
Among the artists working in this era, Hitler “Also thought highly of Spitzweg although what he admired was not so much the bold and often impressionistic brushwork as the staunch middle-class genre quality, the affable humor with which Spitzweg gently mocked the small-town Munich of his period.”
In a video interview with the Louisiana Channel in 2017, Ulay explained that he chose to steal “The Poor Poet” because “You could say [it] was a German identity icon. Besides, it was Hitler’s favorite painting.”
In 2015, he told author Dominic Johnson for his book The Art of Living: An Oral History of Performance Art that the only image printed in color in his school textbook in the 1940s in Germany was this painting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Long Should You Workout”

Now, new research shows that not only can the right kind of resistance training put more power in your pedals, but also you can start gaining strength in less time than it takes to set up a pair of tubeless tires-just 13 minutes a session, according to the study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.
In the study, researchers at CUNY Lehman College in the Bronx and other institutions set out to determine the impact various set and repetition combinations would have on muscle strength, endurance, and hypertrophy, or how big their muscles grew.
One group performed five sets of each exercise, with about 90 seconds of rest between sets-a high volume approach that had them in the gym for over an hour.
The second, medium-volume group performed three sets of each exercise, which took about 40 minutes to complete.
Finally, a low-volume group performed just one set of each exercise, getting them in and out of the gym in just 13 minutes.
Each group performed their assigned workout three times per week for eight weeks.
Surprisingly, there were no significant difference among the groups in strength and endurance gains: The quick-hit lifters enjoyed the same improvements as those who were in the gym five times as long.
In short, the more sets the men lifted, the bigger their muscles got.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The secret life of teen scooter outlaws”

The scooters began showing up in cities a year ago, growing exponentially thanks to millions of dollars that investors like Uber and Google have put into startups like Lime, Scoot, Jump, and Skip.
The scooters have become wildly popular among adult riders – Lime says it has racked up 6 million trips between June 2017 and July 2018.
Instead, she preferred to commute on a Bird scooter every day to work this summer, and when Bird turned off its service at night, she came home on a Lime scooter.
Some have even crashed, such as Max Wix, 15, who fell off a Skip scooter in DC while leaning back riding down a hill.
To ride, you first punch in a phone number and a payment method to each service’s app before finding a scooter from a map.
“By getting on the scooter, you’re acknowledging that you’re over 18.” Lime did promise to verify age by scanning the barcodes on riders’ driver’s licenses in its successful proposal to operate in Santa Monica, a key piece of the city’s administrative regulations for scooter operators.
In late August, when the San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency awarded permits for scooter operation, Lime didn’t receive a permit.
The kids are still riding, including those like Angelica and Max Wix who experienced problems with the scooters.

The orginal article.