Summary of “The Real Reason the U.S. Has Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance”

Specifically, to offer more, and more generous, health care insurance.
In 1940, about 9 percent of Americans had some form of health insurance.
People become dependent on their employment for their health insurance, and they are loath to leave their jobs, even when doing so might make their lives better.
The single largest tax expenditure in the United States is for employer-based health insurance.
The tax break for employer-sponsored health insurance is worth more to people making a lot of money than people making little.
The system also induces people to spend more money on health insurance than other things, most likely increasing overall health care spending.
Many economists believe that employer-sponsored health insurance is hurting Americans’ paychecks.
Known as the Healthy Americans Act, it would have transitioned everyone from employer-sponsored health insurance to insurance exchanges modeled on the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Three things that will never be the same after the iPhone 8”

If you listen to Apple’s inflationary marketing spiel, every time the company launches a new iPhone, it “Changes everything.” The prosaic truth is that most iPhone releases aren’t all that revolutionary.
As we face up to the culmination of another year of hyped-up iPhone speculation, I do see three particular ways in which the iPhone 8 will indeed be the harbinger of massive and irrevocable change.
Flagship prices Same story as with displays: Apple’s pricey new iPhone won’t be an isolated exception, but rather it will be the foam at the top of a gradually building wave of change in the mobile industry.
That’s the simple reality of the phone market today, and it’s the thing Apple’s new iPhone pricing will reiterate to a wider audience.
Apple’s elevated iPhone pricing is likely to grant some much-needed respite to its Android competitors.
The Galaxy Note 8 is going to hit retail shelves at roughly the same time as Apple’s new iPhones, and its own lofty price won’t look out of place when compared against the nearest Apple alternative.
Apple CEO Tim Cook has repeatedly expressed his belief that “Augmented reality will be bigger than virtual reality,” and with the instant user base that the iPhone promises to ARKit developers, it’s easy to foresee AR taking off with the launch of the iPhone 8 and iOS 11.
The original iPhone was also not the finished article in its first generation, and it took Apple a few years to perfect it, but we celebrate it now as the start of the iPhone transformation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Meat Industry Thinks About Non-Meat-Eaters”

I spoke to Keefe earlier this month about what worries meat processors most at the moment, how the industry thinks about the animal-welfare movement, and the snazzy machinery I saw advertised in her magazine’s pages.
Increasingly, meat is working its way into diets in some really impoverished countries; as these countries create a middle class, they start to eat more meat.
At the same time, a meat plant is still an incredibly dangerous place to work-particularly slaughterhouses, but just about any meat plant-because you are talking about sharp objects and repetitive motions.
Keefe: Coming here from a marketing publication was very interesting, because the meat industry has traditionally not done almost any sort of marketing, nor has it had to: Ninety-six percent of consumers in the United States eat some sort of meat at least occasionally, and it used to be that they bought whatever package of ground beef was at the store.
The meat industry has a difficult time-it’s better than it used to be-but it’s had a difficult time responding, because culturally it just never has had to.
One thing about people in the meat industry is that they’re not going to be in the meat industry by accident.
People who work in the meat industry, whether it is on the line or in the small butcher shop, or on the ranches, or in the big processing plants with all kinds of robots and things, they’re in the business because they see what they’re doing as something more than just making meat products.
So a lot of people in the industry wonder why they have to defend themselves when people who do not know as much as they do about the science of meat processing are telling them they’re wrong.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kyrie Irving Is the New Kobe Bryant”

I’m a New Yorker who believes Earth is round, and yet the Boston Celtics’ Kyrie Irving has won me over.
On Friday, Boston flew Gordon Hayward in from his summer abode in San Diego and Irving from the Uncle Drew movie set in Atlanta to formally introduce both as Celtics.
I look forward to the day when the Selfless Gordo narrative begins with how he waited nearly two months for an introductory presser, and when the time finally came, he agreed to share it with Kyrie Irving.
Irving is already showing some affection for Al Horford.
Previously, the most affinity Irving had shown for his teammates was going to clubs with Iman Shumpert and appearing on Channing Frye and Richard Jefferson’s podcast.
Is there any reason to believe that the Celtics collegiality evinced by Irving is shared by his new teammates? There’s no evidence otherwise, but there was another famous player who referred to collegial relationships that were never born out.
If the introductory press conference was any indication, Kyrie has arrived to pursue his “Craft” while speaking with a candor he never indulged in while in Cleveland.
If that’s the case, Irving has at least one new fan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Seahawks’ Michael Bennett is an activist disguised as a football player”

Inside, Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett is trying to stump a DJ hired for the event.
There’s more to it: “I believe in the connection of people,” Bennett says.
Listen to Bennett speak for a few unfiltered minutes and it’s clear that he is an activist disguised as a professional football player.
“It’s so simple for a lineman to block for Marshawn Lynch, but it’s a lot harder for that same lineman, if he’s a white lineman, to go to the neighborhood and see what Marshawn Lynch is doing and want to be a part of it,” Bennett says.
Bennett wants to put a spotlight on that disconnect until people recognize that these entertainers with elite physical abilities are human and vulnerable.
Bennett wants fans to know about these struggles, even if it might turn an entertaining bit of escapism into another prism of messy reality.
Bennett wants his fellow athletes and the corporations they endorse to feel uncomfortable about it.
“You can literally come right here to Lower Brule and see how people are living, to see how people are oppressed all around the United States,” Bennett says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Can’t We Get Cities Right?”

Where Houston has long been famous for its virtual absence of regulations on building, greater San Francisco is famous for its NIMBYism – that is, the power of “Not in my backyard” sentiment to prevent new housing construction.
The median monthly rent on a one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco is more than $3,000, the highest in the nation and roughly triple the rent in Houston; the median price of a single-family home is more than $800,000.
While geography – the constraint imposed by water and mountains – is often offered as an excuse for the Bay Area’s failure to build more housing, there’s no good reason it couldn’t build up.
San Francisco housing is now quite a lot more expensive than New York housing, so why not have more tall buildings?
It turns out that America’s big metropolitan areas are pretty sharply divided between Sunbelt cities where anything goes, like Houston or Atlanta, and those on the East or West Coast where nothing goes, like San Francisco or, to a lesser extent, New York.The point is that this is one policy area where “Both sides get it wrong” – a claim I usually despise – turns out to be right.
In sprawling cities, real-estate developers exert outsized influence, and the more these cities sprawl, the more powerful the developers get.
In NIMBY cities, soaring prices make affluent homeowners even less willing to let newcomers in.
In blue states where cities build too little, there’s a growing political movement calling for more housing supply.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dr Con Man: the rise and fall of a celebrity scientist who fooled almost everyone”

She met Macchiarini while producing A Leap of Faith and was soon breaking one of the cardinal rules of journalism: don’t fall in love with the subject of your story.
Macchiarini’s deceit was so outlandish, Vanity Fair sought the opinion of the Harvard professor Ronald Schouten, an expert on psychopaths, who gave this diagnosis-at-a-distance: “Macchiarini is the extreme form of a con man. He’s clearly bright and has accomplishments, but he can’t contain himself. There’s a void in his personality that he seems to want to fill by conning more and more people.”
Which left a big, burning question in the air: if Macchiarini was a pathological liar in matters of love, what about his medical research? Was he conning his patients, his colleagues and the scientific community?
Macchiarini’s fall was swift, but troubling questions remain about why he was allowed to continue his experiments for so long.
These included Harriet Wallberg, who was the vice-chancellor of the Karolinska Institute in 2010, when Macchiarini was recruited.
In early 2014, four Karolinska doctors defied the reigning culture of silence by complaining about Macchiarini.
The scandal is much bigger than Karolinska, which accounts for only three of the patients who have received Macchiarini’s “Regenerating” windpipes.
In Macchiarini’s case, the hope was that patients could be treated with stem cells taken from their own bone marrow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Baby Wails, and the Adult World Comes Running”

The new study is just one in a series of recent reports that reveal the centrality of crying to infant survival, and how a baby’s bawl punches through a cluttered acoustic landscape to demand immediate adult attention.
The sound of an infant’s cry arouses a far quicker and stronger response in action-oriented parts of the adult brain than do similarly loud or emotionally laden noises, like a dog barking or a neighbor weeping.
Susan Lingle, a biologist at the University of Winnipeg, and her co-workers have conducted field studies in which they broadcast through loudspeakers the amplified crèche cries of a panoply of animals, including a baby bat, a baby eland, a sea lion pup, a baby marmot, a kid goat and a domestic kitten.
At a conference on infant wailing held earlier this summer in Italy, Dr. Lingle played an audio clip of cries from a kid, fawn and baby, and asked the audience which was human.
Mariano Chóliz, a psychologist at the University of Valencia, and his co-workers have made a first-pass attempt to categorize infant cries.
Studying both superfast brain scans of healthy volunteers and direct electrode measurements in adult patients who were undergoing neurosurgery for other reasons, Dr. Young, with Christine E. Parsons of Aarhus University in Denmark, Morten L. Kringelbach of Oxford University and other colleagues, has tracked the brain’s response to the sound of an infant cry.
Subjects then listened to recordings of babies crying, adults crying or birds singing, and played the game again.
“We saw better scores and more effortful pressing after the infant cries,” Dr. Young said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Bike-Sharing Brings Out Bad Manners, China Asks, What’s Wrong With Us?”

“We look at ourselves, and we ask, ‘What is wrong with the Chinese nation, the Chinese people?'” said Xu Qinduo, a political commentator for China Radio International in Beijing.
Over 10,000 confiscated shared bikes piled up like a mountain in east China https://t.
On social media and in conversation, it is common to hear people describe bike-sharing as a “Monster-revealing mirror” that has exposed the true nature of the Chinese people.
Chinese often invoke “Low suzhi” in criticizing the bad habits or manners of others, and have bemoaned a deficit of suzhi in Chinese society for generations, sometimes arguing that they cannot be trusted with elections because their suzhi is too low.
In interviews with Chinese news outlets, the company’s founder, Wu Shenghua, blamed the public’s “Poor suzhi” in part for driving the company out of business.
Hu Weiwei, founder and president of Mobike, one of the most popular bike-sharing apps in China, said the benefits of shared bicycles far outweighed any inconvenience, noting reductions in carbon emissions and improvements in traffic.
“A good system can bring out people’s good will and moral values,” she said.
Mr. Yan said the overall success of bike sharing suggested that mutual trust was growing in China.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Goodbye, Yosemite. Hello, What?”

A man whose photographs defined Yosemite in the national imagination and yet rarely included Yosemite Indians, Adams wrote of the Ahwahnee that “The Indian motif is supreme,” adding, “The designs are stylized with tasteful sophistication; decidedly Indian, yet decidedly more than Indian, they epitomize the involved and intricate symbolism of primitive man.”
Soon they were planning to replace it with a Yosemite Indian Village, which put the federal government in the silly business of deciding what an “Indian village” ought to look like and who qualified as sufficiently “Yosemite Indian” to live there.
The last remnants of the Yosemite Indian Village were destroyed in 1969.
The recent furor over the name of the Ahwahnee began in 2015, when a subsidiary of the Delaware North Corporation, which operated the park’s hotels, restaurants and shops for more than two decades under a government concession contract, lost its contract to Aramark.
The National Park Service came up with new names and told Delaware North to get lost.
My vote would be to change Tenaya Lake to Pywiack Lake, relabel Yosemite Valley itself Ahwahnee and sprinkle the park with new historical plaques saying things like “On this spot, in 1851, American militiamen shot Tenaya’s son in the back, let him bleed out in the grass, then dragged Tenaya up to have a look and enjoyed watching him weep.”
“There’s so many people in Yosemite we can’t even get there. So we don’t care who calls what anything! You can’t even find a parking spot!” That may be too much to ask.
The National Park Service won’t seriously consider limiting private cars in Yosemite – because, I presume, that might slow the growth of somebody’s hamburger sales.

The orginal article.