Summary of “Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?”

Walk around the musicians’ home city of Dublin and you’ll barely see an image of Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr. There’s no major mural solely dedicated to the group.
You might catch some graffiti scrawled on concrete walls and darkened doorways, opining in classically Irish slang that, “Bono is a Pox”.
To huge sections of the Irish population, Bono is about as welcome as cold sores and spam email.
“I think it’s quite an accomplishment for Bono. He does so much for charity and the poor and yet people still do hate him,” says 24-year-old Karl Downey.
Bono believes some of the Irish vitriol can be traced back to the band’s opposition to Noraid, an organisation that funded the IRA during the Troubles.
Smith adds: “There’s a huge that just see U2, and Bono in particular, as hypocrites, because their tax arrangements are deliberately structured – and he makes no bones about this – so that they don’t pay [as many] taxes.”
The core of the Irish public’s contempt for U2 involves some of Bono’s activities outside of the band.
Almost no one would deny that Bono genuinely cares about Earth’s human suffering and wants to leverage his cultural standing to help eradicate it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hidden Features and Third Party Programs That Make Spotify Work for You”

With over 30 million songs and close to 1,500 genres, it’s no wonder that Spotify has become the go-to app for music connoisseurs the world over.
A number of users feel that finding new artists on Spotify and curating playlists is still too tedious.
Free yourself from Spotify’s suggested songs tool and write your own playlist programs.
Without a doubt, playlists are the heart and soul of Spotify.
With Smarter Playlists, the external browser-based Spotify extension, you can create your own customizable playlists.
Once the playlist is ready, you can import and save it on Spotify.
Let Spotify only show you songs of a certain genre, or organize your songs based on their respective popularity.
Spotify users with Last.fm accounts-in the scrobbling service’s heyday, that was approximately 40 million listeners-can import their Last.fm listening history into Spotify using Spotlistr.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Christopher Nolan Movie Is”

Christopher Nolan Week.To celebrate the release of Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan’s latest film, on Friday, we’ll be paying our respects to the director and his unique ability to produce grand cinematic experiences that are simultaneously very popular.
‘Memento’K. Austin Collins: Memento isn’t Christopher Nolan’s best movie, but it might be one of the most valuable.
Fast-forward to today, and a number of directors in film and television - including Nolan himself - are making that kind of show and movie.
Zack Snyder wouldn’t have the job he does without Christopher Nolan, full stop; without the Dark Knight trilogy we wouldn’t have the doom-and-gloom-superhero disease that’s afflicting even all-American golden boys like Superman.
‘The Prestige’Kate Knibbs: How many Christopher Nolan movies feature arch supporting turns from David Bowie, again? Ah, that’s right.
Christopher Nolan has made a ton of great films, and also Interstellar, so it’s not like I want to champion The Prestige by dismissing his other work, although in the spirit of The Prestige’s hypercompetitive dueling magicians, I will say that it’s the most rewatchable Nolan film by far.
‘Inception’Micah Peters: Listen, as Nolan movies go, The Prestige has the best Michael Caine performance in it and possibly the best twist.
There may have been moments in other Nolan movies that have surpassed it since, but none of those would be possible without the palette Nolan landed on with Batman Begins.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Chinese Megacities to See Before You Die”

As a Chinese friend of mine was helping me buy a plane ticket from Kunming to Chongqing, I read aloud from my guidebook: “… the [city] has little appeal. Overcrowded and fast-paced, the city is plagued by oppressive pollution, winter fogs and summer humidity. Nor is there much to illustrate Chongqing’s history”.
Chinese megacities have horrible reputations, yet over the last few years I’ve tried to visit as many of them as I can.
First, Chinese megacities are associated with the greatest migration in human history, namely the movement of several hundred million people from the countryside into urban areas.
To suggest otherwise is actually to repeat a common Western imperialist meme about the Chinese, namely that they “Are all the same” in some underlying manner.
Observing and understanding diversity is a skill, and the Chinese megacities are one of the best places for cultivating this capacity.
The uniqueness of each Chinese megacity is reflected in the food, which in turn mirrors the culture and the surrounding natural resources.
Most Chinese megacities attract few Western tourists.
There are often many Chinese tourists, but that can be as interesting as the place itself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Peak Performance: The cognitive trick that elite athletes use to achieve seemingly impossible goals”

Years later, I’m still struck by how I was able to move beyond my own fear so I could comfort two strangers.
According to Brad Stulberg and Steve Magness, who write about the accomplishments of elite athletes in their new book Peak Performance, there’s a simple phenomenon that allows people to overcome their fears and limitations: a concept called self-transcendence.
While researching their book, Stulberg and Magness interviewed countless scientists and world-renowned athletes.
Take the story of American long-distance runner Jennifer Pharr Davis who in 2011 achieved a new record by becoming the first woman to hike the Appalachian Trail in less than 50 days: 46 days, 11 hours, and 20 minutes, to be precise.
People who exhibit “Superhuman” strength are able to do so only when they focus on a purpose greater than themselves.
“A self-transcending purpose doesn’t come from thin air. It comes from inside you.” In the 1997 film, Gattaca, for example, we learn early on that Ethan Hawkes’ character, Vincent, has always dreamt of going into space.
An incredulous Anton demands to know how he was able to win.
“You want to know how I did it? I never saved anything for the swim back.” In other words, his desire to move past societally imposed limitations allowed him to transcend even the fear of death.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Unsettled”

In 2014, the BBC reported on the influx of Western tech workers into Bali, there for the beautiful landscapes, the cheap cost of living, and vague ideas about how mindfulness and meditation can increase corporate productivity.
Roam members are encouraged to pay an amount of rent that also serves as a kind of membership fee and wander from city to city – “Come and go as you please” as the website says – taking up residence wherever Roam has a space.
One could live for years at Roam without actually putting down roots in Bali.
These co-living spaces allow their residents to live in bubbles – one Roam client compared the service to like “Being on a spaceship” – where they have a direct impact on Bali, but Bali is not able to have a direct impact on them.
His vision is of opening enough properties around the world that one could live entirely within the Roam network.
Wilriani, who is Roam’s “Community ambassador,” used to live in a nearby town but recently moved into Roam herself.
Up until the 19th century, they housed women who left the countryside to work in new textile mills, creating a friendly living environment for women separated from their families but either not yet married or trying to avoid it altogether.
There are have been reports all over the world of migrants who came to places like the U.S. to work in agriculture or Dubai to work in construction and who are left in overcrowded, substandard housing, until they are worked often literally to death.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Truth about How Creativity Really Works”

“Maybe that’s enlightenment enough: to know that there is no final resting place of the mind; no moment of smug clarity. Perhaps wisdomis realizing how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go.” - Anthony BourdainOn March 20, 1997, a quiet crowd settled into the Old Post Chapel at Arlington National Cemetery for the memorial service of Colonel John Boyd.John Boyd was a fighter pilot.
Boyd’s work focused on how the military could adapt from the highly centralized 19th and early 20th century wars between large nation states to the reality that began for the U.S. with Vietnam: a guerilla-style war between incumbent central governments and insurgent guerilla forces.
Snowmobiling, Boyd’s term, is how Creativity really happens.
The tendency is that once you create a coherent conceptual system that explains reality, you turn inwards to refine the system within itself and work out the details.
According to Gödel, you can’t understand a system from within that system.
Any self-consistent system cannot be proven to be self-consistent from within that system.
In order to determine the consistency of a new system, we need to discover another system beyond it.
Any attempts to prove the system is consistent and matches up with reality actually generates even more disorder and uncertainty, and it makes the conceptual system less useful for increasing your capacity for independent action.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why The Vietnam War Is Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s Most Ambitious Project Yet”

In the years since, the Vietnam War has periodically been the subject of waves of cinematic reckoning-in the late 70s, with such films as Coming Home, The Deer Hunter, and Apocalypse Now, and again in the late 80s, with such films as Platoon, Full Metal Jacket, Casualties of War, and Born on the Fourth of July.
When the filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick were finishing up their World War II documentary series, The War, they felt that the timing was right for them to take a crack at Vietnam.
Burns and Novick also surmised, correctly, that their Vietnam project would carry them well into the following decade, by which time the crucial years of the war would be a half-century in the past.
The Vietnam War, in scope and sensitivity, is the most ambitious and fraught project Burns has ever taken on.
The Vietnam War was the first and last American conflict to be filmed by news organizations with minimal governmental interference, and the filmmakers have drawn from more than 130 sources for motion-picture footage, including the U.S. networks, private home-movie collections, and several archives administered by the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
By dint of its thoroughness, its fairness, and its pedigree, The Vietnam War is as good an occasion as we’ve ever had for a levelheaded national conversation about America’s most divisive foreign war.
That said, The Vietnam War is instructive in showing us how we got to where we are now-reflexively cynical about our leaders, quick to take sides-because the war itself marked an inflection point.
Watching the first half of The Vietnam War is akin to being the narrator of Delmore Schwartz’s short story “In Dreams Begin Responsibilities,” a young man who, in a dream, watches a film of his parents’ courtship playing on a movie screen and is moved to stand up in the theater and shout, “Don’t do it! … Nothing good will come of it, only remorse, hatred, scandal.” The war’s outcome is fixed, but one winces nevertheless every time John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, or the defense secretary who served them both, Robert S. McNamara, ignores or rejects a plausible exit strategy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Microsoft’s default font is at the center of a government corruption case”

After creating a font in 2004, its creators probably never thought it’d be used as evidence in a government corruption case.
Microsoft, for its part, couldn’t have foreseen it either after making Calibri the default option on products like PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, and WordPad in 2007.
Unintended use case aside, Calibri currently sits at the center of a corruption investigation involving Pakistan’s Prime Minister, Nawaz Sharif.
Accused of illegally profiting from his position since the 1990s, Sharif is now under investigation by the Joint Investigative Team – a collective of Pakistani police, military, and financial regulators – after a treasure trove of evidence surfaced with 2016’s release of The Panama Papers.
In a report obtained by Al Jazeera, investigators recommended a case be filed in the National Accountability Court after concluding there were “Significant gap[s]” in Sharif’s ability to account for his familial assets.
Sharif contends that neither he, nor his family, profited from his position of power, a denial that came under scrutiny today after his daughter and political heir apparent, Maryam Nawaz, produced documents from 2006 that prove her father’s innocence.
Unfortunately for the Nawaz family, type experts today confirmed the documents were written in Calibri, a font that wasn’t available until 2007.
For Nawaz, it looks like you can add forgery to a list of offenses that already features millions in possibly illegal offshore holdings and shady real estate deals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NBA Has Some New Rule Changes, and We Have a Few Questions”

Among the changes: There will be fewer timeouts during games, and teams will have a shorter window than before to pull off trades before the deadline.
What do the new rules mean for the trade deadline, for All-Star weekend, and for strength and conditioning? We have questions about the upcoming season, which will start on October 17, a week earlier than last year, and the same day as Gucci Mane’s wedding.
Fixing Hack-a-Shaq is more complicated than taking away timeouts or moving up the trade deadline; it’s an in-game judgment of whether or not a foul is intentionally stopping the offense.
Uggetti: Do the league’s owners take pride and joy in watching DeAndre Jordan be humiliated at the free throw line? If pace and speed are of utmost importance, and enough to cut down on timeouts, a real part of the game, then there’s no reason why the NBA can’t amend its intentional fouling rule.
As Dan Feldman pointed out here the NBA will lose out on the momentum that is usually created between the All-Star break and the second half of the season.
Players live where they play, and having to move homes and families to a different city after a sudden trade in the middle of the season is not ideal.
Putting the trade deadline before the All-Star Game does allow them more time to facilitate their move.
Wait, what happens if an Eastern Conference All-Star gets traded to the West? And vice versa?Uggetti: In 2008, then-Denver Nugget Allen Iverson got traded for then-Detroit Piston Chauncey Billups.

The orginal article.