Summary of “Goodbye, Yosemite. Hello, What?”

A man whose photographs defined Yosemite in the national imagination and yet rarely included Yosemite Indians, Adams wrote of the Ahwahnee that “The Indian motif is supreme,” adding, “The designs are stylized with tasteful sophistication; decidedly Indian, yet decidedly more than Indian, they epitomize the involved and intricate symbolism of primitive man.”
Soon they were planning to replace it with a Yosemite Indian Village, which put the federal government in the silly business of deciding what an “Indian village” ought to look like and who qualified as sufficiently “Yosemite Indian” to live there.
The last remnants of the Yosemite Indian Village were destroyed in 1969.
The recent furor over the name of the Ahwahnee began in 2015, when a subsidiary of the Delaware North Corporation, which operated the park’s hotels, restaurants and shops for more than two decades under a government concession contract, lost its contract to Aramark.
The National Park Service came up with new names and told Delaware North to get lost.
My vote would be to change Tenaya Lake to Pywiack Lake, relabel Yosemite Valley itself Ahwahnee and sprinkle the park with new historical plaques saying things like “On this spot, in 1851, American militiamen shot Tenaya’s son in the back, let him bleed out in the grass, then dragged Tenaya up to have a look and enjoyed watching him weep.”
“There’s so many people in Yosemite we can’t even get there. So we don’t care who calls what anything! You can’t even find a parking spot!” That may be too much to ask.
The National Park Service won’t seriously consider limiting private cars in Yosemite – because, I presume, that might slow the growth of somebody’s hamburger sales.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Incarcerated Women Who Fight California’s Wildfires”

During World War II, California turned its prisons into factories for the military industry and moved inmates into the temporary forestry camps of the Civilian Conservation Corps, a public work-relief program created during the Depression.
In 1946, as part of Gov. Earl Warren’s Prisoner Rehabilitation Act, the state opened Camp Rainbow which – under the joint supervision of the state’s Division of Forestry and the California Department of Corrections – housed inmates to clear fire lines.
”Any fire you go on statewide, whether it be small or large, the inmate hand crews make up anywhere from 50 to 80 percent of the total fire personnel,” says Lt. Keith Radey, the commander who is in charge of a camp where women train.
At Malibu 13, one of three conservation camps that house women, the commander, John Scott, showed me a printout: Inmate firefighters can make a maximum of $2.56 a day in camp and $1 an hour when they’re fighting fires.
After visiting three camps over a year and a half, I could see why inmates would accept the risks.
They’re being trained to work in a field they will probably have trouble finding a job in when they get out: Los Angeles County Fire won’t hire felons and C.D.C.R. doesn’t offer any formal help to inmates who want firefighting jobs when they’re released.
The Conservation Camp Program saves California taxpayers approximately $100 million a year, according to C.D.C.R. Several states, including Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and Georgia employ prisoners to fight fires, but none of them rely as heavily on its inmate population as California does.
Faced with the prospect of a state in flames, California continues to depend on its inmate firefighters as a tenuous and all-but-invisible line of defense.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Once Talked To Seth Godin On The Phone: Here’s How It Changed My Life and Business”

Casey coaches business owners on how to scale their companies, helping entrepreneurs become CEOs.
It’s not going to be easy, you’re probably going to hate it, but in the end, you’ll be able to get out of your business and do what you really want.
How a phone call with Seth Godin changed everythingI shared my concerns with Casey, and once again he said, “Jeff, you don’t have to do this. Why don’t you take the next few days to decide what you really want?”.
“Don’t build a business because you want freedom. Build a business because you want to run a business.”
Scale my business, graduate to CEO, and acquire other businesses to help deal with the churn of my industry, eventually creating an 8- or 9-figure company and selling it.
I thought about spending the next two years of their lives trying to scale a business, which felt like precious time to spend on something I didn’t intend to do for the rest of my life.
For me, the business was a means to make an income while I continue to write.
Today, there is a lot of pressure for writers and creatives to start a business, make money doing something they’re not passionate about in hopes of finally having the time to do what they really love.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Tell If Someone Is Lying: 10 Tells and Clues”

If you’re suspicious that someone isn’t telling the truth, can you look the person in the eyes and tell? Well, let’s try.
There are behaviors and tells that should make you wonder whether the person you’re dealing with is being truthful.
We tend to think that liars are the ones who can’t keep their stories straight, but we’ll list this so-called tell first, and thus least reliable, because there are other explanations for changing stories.
Most truthful people, when they’re asked to retell a story several times, will remember additional details each time-which means the stories they tell will change.
There are some tells that can suggest lack of veracity: blushing, blinking, flared nostrils, fake smiles.
Again, this isn’t a foolproof tell, but it’s another piece of evidence to consider as you weigh the likelihood that you’re being told something untruthful.
As my colleague Justin Bariso points out, key tells could be when people “Say no and look in a different direction,” “Say no and close their eyes,” “Say no after hesitating,” “Say noooooooo, stretched over a long period of time,” or “Say no in a singsong manner.”
Consider this one a bonus-a tell that lets you know when someone holds you in contempt but attempts to continue the conversation anyway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These 31 Questions Will Break the Ice with Absolutely Anyone: a Hollywood Star, a Head of State, the CEO or the Cute Person Sitting Next to You on the Train”

Or, you board the commuter train or go to a noisy cocktail party or take a spin class and suddenly you realize that the person next to you, the extremely attractive guy/gal, is smiling at you and offering to give you some kale chips/buy you a drink/take you out for green smoothies.
The Greek philosopher Socrates knew that questions are more engaging than providing information.
Media interviewers use surprising questions to gain fresh insights into a famous person’s psyche.
My firm uses unusual questions to enliven the usually dull Q&A-style executive interview.
So even if you’re not a philosopher or a journalist, you can use questions to break the ice, draw someone out or simply overcome awkward silences.
What’s the best movie you’ve seen this year?
What is the best compliment you’ve ever received?
Got it? Start with one question and you’ll be pleased by where the conversation can lead..

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Case for Investing More in People”

“Productivity isn’t everything, but in the long run it is almost everything,” wrote Paul Krugman more than 20 years ago.
There is a virtuous cycle between productivity and people: Higher levels of productivity allow society to reinvest in human capital, and smart investments result in higher labor productivity.
Of course, low productivity can depress wages, but in recent decades, wages haven’t grown as much as expected even during periods of robust economic productivity growth.
“For most of the last half-century – 84 percent of the time since 1966 – average wages have grown more slowly than would be predicted based on productivity and inflation growth,” The New York Times reported.
The evidence suggests the former: We could improve productivity if we stopped systematically underinvesting in human capital.
Giving managers more time to do deep thinking can unlock innovations that can have a significant impact on productivity.
This is the gateway to the discretionary energy that multiplies labor productivity: An inspired employee is more than twice as productive as a satisfied employee and more than three times as productive as a dissatisfied employee.
Robert Gordon, a macroeconomist at Northwestern University, has shown that periods of breakout productivity in the United States were not the result of capital deepening, but of what economists call total factor productivity, a catch-all measure for the impact of technological innovation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lane Kiffin era begins at Florida Atlantic”

THESE YEEZYS, MAN. You need, like, special dispensation from Kanye himself to get your hands on them, and a lot of people are mad at Lane Kiffin for snagging two pairs.
Kiffin’s shoe score has all the hallmarks of a Lane Kiffin yarn, but with a twist.
So would his bosses in Boca Raton, Florida, in the FBS backwater of Conference USA. The 2017 party line on Kiffin, beginning with Friday’s game against Navy, is one of metamorphosis.
FROM THE MOMENT Kiffin burst onto the scene in the college game, he has made such a bratty name for himself that it’s easy to forget he can actually coach.
Lane Kiffin says if he had still been offensive coordinator, Alabama would have won the title game against Clemson.
“I can assure you, no one puts more pressure on Lane Kiffin than Lane Kiffin. He wants to prove to everyone that he’s grown as a head coach, and from where we sit today, I think we’re all ecstatic with the work he’s done.”
There’s another personnel move that can’t be casually dismissed: If we’re buying Kiffin’s reformation, we’re also being asked to believe he took several days of careful thought to conclude that Baylor’s Kendal Briles – who told CBSSports.com that he was texted “Out of the blue” by Kiffin, whom he’d only met on a Baylor staff trip to Alabama two years ago – was the most suitable candidate to bring in as offensive coordinator.
Kiffin downplayed the ex-Baylor head coach’s role in follow-up interviews, telling ESPN: “That’s classic ‘Somebody trying to make it a story’ because it’s Art Briles and Lane Kiffin.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power Of Compounding: You Can Achieve Anything, If You Stop Trying To Do Everything”

There’s one important thing about all this working, hustling, striving, and achieving more: You can’t do everything at the same time.
Success Adds Up Real success happens when we focus on one thing at a time.
I achieve much more when I give my attention to one thing.
“Where I’d had huge success, I had narrowed my concentration to one thing, and where my success varied, my focus had too.”
Are you working on a lot of things? Is your attention not on one thing? The chances are high that you will fail or not get the best results you can.
Another thing: Buffett acquired 99% of his net worth after he became 50.
You can achieve big things with small actions, that build up over time.
If you want to see the impact of compounding in your own life, it requires you to focus on one thing at a time and always look at the bigger picture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The War on Public Schools”

Public schools have always occupied prime space in the excitable American imagination.
Our secretary of education, Betsy DeVos, has repeatedly signaled her support for school choice and privatization, as well as her scorn for public schools, describing them as a “Dead end” and claiming that unionized teachers “Care more about a system, one that was created in the 1800s, than they care about individual students.”
These gains have come even as the student body of American public schools has expanded to include students with ever greater challenges.
U.S. public schools, at their best, have encouraged a unique mixing of diverse people, and produced an exceptionally innovative and industrious citizenry.
In the centuries since, the courts have regularly affirmed the special status of public schools as a cornerstone of the American democratic project.
In its vigorous defenses of students’ civil liberties-to protest the Vietnam War, for example, or not to salute the flag-the Supreme Court has repeatedly held public schools to an especially high standard precisely because they play a unique role in fostering citizens.
Ravitch writes that “One of the greatest glories of the public school was its success in Americanizing immigrants.” At their best, public schools did even more than that, integrating both immigrants and American-born students from a range of backgrounds into one citizenry.
So what happens when we neglect the public purpose of our publicly funded schools? The discussion of vouchers and charter schools, in its focus on individual rights, has failed to take into account American society at large.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The purpose of life isn’t to be happy-it’s to be fulfilled”

To them, happiness was indeed the chief aim in life, but they had a very different definition of what the term actually meant.
If you ask the average person today what they want out of life, the majority will tell you that they want to be happy.
If you dig deeper into what they mean, they’ll tell that they want to feel good and comfortable and be at ease.
I’ve come to terms with the fact that comparing myself to others is a waste of time, and I don’t want to get stuck chasing hedonistic temptations for the rest of my life.
My happiness isn’t a product of me getting what I want.
It’s the byproduct of the different challenges I have proactively overcome to earn what I want.
In the modern world, we have a lot of choice in terms of the exposure that we want to give ourselves to these stressors.
Want to think and live smarter? Zat Rana publishes a free weekly newsletter for 10,000+ readers at Design Luck.

The orginal article.