Summary of “Why Apple is struggling to become an artificial-intelligence powerhouse”

SAN JOSE – In 2011, Apple became the first company to place artificial intelligence in the pockets of millions of consumers when it launched the voice assistant Siri on the iPhone.
Six years later, the technology giant is struggling to find its voice in AI. Analysts say the question of whether Apple can succeed in building great artificial-intelligence products is as fundamental to the company’s next decade as the iPhone was to its previous one.
“Artificial intelligence is not in Apple’s DNA,” said venture capitalist and Apple analyst Gene Munster.
At Apple’s annual developers conference Monday – the same event where Siri was introduced – the company’s efforts to become an AI powerhouse were on display as executives launched a new stand-alone smart speaker and touted features meant to boost Siri’s chops and to power AI applications on Apple products.
Sales of the iPhone propelled Apple to become the most valuable company in the world and still account for more than half of the company’s revenue, which was $215.6 billion in 2016.
In December, Apple presented and published its first academic paper on artificial intelligence at an industry conference.
Researchers at elite universities said in interviews that Apple was still not the top choice for their computer science graduates – Google, Facebook and Amazon were by far the top picks – but that the company was moving up in the rankings.
Last year, as Apple began to embrace artificial intelligence on the iPhone, the company undertook a large privacy protection project.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Doist Makes Remote Work Happen”

How do you build a high-functioning, united team without face-to-face interactions? This post is a reflection on our journey and the key things we’ve done that have been fundamental to thriving as a remote team.
That’s not to say we hire cookie cutters replicas of ourselves – our diverse perspectives 100% lead to better decisions, a better product, and a better team culture – but everyone needs to be on the same page in terms of how we communicate and work.
One of the biggest challenges in adapting to remote work ­- particularly once you’ve been successful hiring smart, proactive people who are excited about the job they’re doing – is knowing where to draw the line between work and life.
Work rarely happens outside of Twist, even in the small office we have for the contingent of six working from Porto, Portugal.
They get to see exactly how we work together to get feedback, troubleshoot issues, and make decisions from start to finish.
It’s been an awesome way to immerse new employees in how our company operates and for them to get up to speed on what’s currently going on without any added work on our end.
We feel like the DO system is a better fit for how we work – light on process with a focus on shipping concrete things quickly – and addresses the big issues we face in coordinating a larger team.
If the way we work resonates with you, you may find that Twist works for your team too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America has become so anti-innovation”

The consequences couldn’t be more serious: the economy that produced Juicero is the same one that’s creating opioid addicts in Ohio, maiming auto workers in Alabama, and evicting families in Los Angeles.
Left to its own devices, the private sector is far more likely to impede technological progress than to advance it.
More recently austerity has gutted the government’s capacity to innovate.
Few of them put significant resources into basic research any more.
Wall Street is more interested in extracting wealth than creating it.
As the public sector starves, the private sector grows ever more bloated and predatory.
Since the 1970s, the American economy has grown far more slowly than during its mid-century golden age – and wages have flatlined.
It’s hard to imagine a more irrational way to organize society.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Boss: How to blow your boss’s mind, add value”

You’re putting the work in, so why aren’t you getting rewarded? The answer is simple: you don’t get promoted for fulfilling your boss’s expectations.
Your boss’s expectations are the price of entry.
You can blow your boss’s mind in seven easy steps.
Professional development is important, but why stop there? If you really want to blow your boss’s mind, soak up everything you can about your company and your industry.
It’s a good feeling when you can answer your boss’s questions on the spot, without shuffling through piles of paper or telling her that you’ll have to get back to her.
We’re not talking about what’s typical; we’re talking about blowing your boss’s mind.
To blow your boss’s mind, you have to be proactive.
An excellent way to blow your boss’s mind is to build relationships throughout the company.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Being the CEO of your career, as a software engineer”

“Nothing is more expensive than a missed opportunity” - H. Hackson Brown, JR.I consider myself a reasonably successful Software Engineer / Architect and I decided to share with you the attitude and behavior that contributed the most in my career development.
If you choose to be an Architect, you’ll climb up the corporate ladder, become influencial and make more money.
Now you have to stop and ask yourself: Is that what you really want? I’m not saying, by any means, that being a Software Architect is a bad career decision, or that it’s impossible to be a hands-on Architect.
It is more difficult to switch jobs as a Software Architect than it is as a Software Engineer.
First, because there’s less need for Architects, and second, because it’s pretty common for Architects to evolve from great Engineers, so you’re more likely to be promoted to an Architect rather than being hired as one.
Your knowledge will start to be more about the internal processes and technologies of the company you work for, rather than industry-standard skills that are valuable to other companies.
I wanted to be a Senior Software Engineer, and that lead me back to the job hunt, and to the final chapter of this article.
Lesson #4: If you think there’s a slight chance that you’ll ever need to find another software development job, keep your problem-solving skills sharp.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Bounty Hunter of Wall Street”

Unlike Chanos, who managed billions of dollars of other people’s money, Left invests his own, which exempts him from disclosing his holdings to the public.
Wuyang Zhao, a professor at the University of Texas, Austin, who wrote his dissertation on activist short-selling, told me: “People read Andrew Left, and they’re like: ‘Oh, my God, it’s not impossibly difficult. It’s not a lot of work, and you can bring down a big company.’ ” One of Left’s friends recalled a visit Left made to a university to give a lecture.
In exchange for sharing his insight and institutional muscle, Left’s source avoided the legal liability that came from going public with a position.
Left has a number of sources on Wall Street, and during the months I spent reporting on him, he took care to keep their names from me, lest he burn them.
An odd tone pervaded, as if a very strait-laced stock analyst were trying to loosen up and channel Left’s combative voice.
As to the identity of the anonymous sender, there was nothing to give up: Left had no idea who it was, except someone who almost certainly had a short position in Evergrande and made a fortune off the publication without the hassle of appearing in court.
If you’re slow, other shorts can scoop you, which is exactly what happened with the online postage seller: A competitor had published a version of Left’s thesis on a finance blog, and the stock’s price had fallen too far to short.
After graduating in 1993, Left responded to a newspaper ad from an outfit called the Universal Commodity Corporation, offering $100,000 a year for work in what the advertiser knew not to call a boiler room.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Outcry Over EpiPen Prices Hasn’t Made Them Lower”

Over the last several weeks, I’ve spoken with 10 former high-ranking executives at Mylan who told me that they weren’t surprised EpiPen prices were still high.
Mylan has been called out again and again over the years – by the company’s own employees, regulators, patients, politicians and the press – and hasn’t changed, even as revenue has skyrocketed, hitting $11 billion last year.
Regulators missed an opportunity to reform Mylan in 2012 when the company produced a television commercial showing a mother driving her son to a birthday party and implying that he could eat whatever he wanted, despite his nut allergy, as long as an EpiPen was nearby to counteract a reaction.
Mylan had recently started a major lobbying effort to encourage schools to stock EpiPens by arguing that people with serious food allergies are always at risk, and that EpiPens were a necessary supplement to emergency medical treatment.
In December, attorneys general in 20 states accused Mylan and five other firms of conspiring to illegally keep prices high on an antibiotic and a diabetes drug.
In April, one of Mylan’s competitors, Sanofi, filed a lawsuit accusing the firm of committing antitrust violations to keep an EpiPen competitor off the market.
The company also said it had found no evidence of price-fixing or antitrust behavior, that the government overcharges had resulted from an innocent disagreement over regulatory interpretations and that Mylan’s compensation policies were appropriate.
Mylan points out there are online coupons for EpiPen customers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Credit Karma’s CEO Built a Sexy Brand in an Unsexy Category with No PR Firm and a Tiny Budget”

It’s Googled more than Geico – considered the standard bearer for companies that have managed to build sexy, personality-driven brands in patently unsexy industries.
“Too often, talking about brand is punted in favor of tasks perceived to be more important like design and manufacturing,” says Lin.
“This is misguided because your brand should inform every decision you end up making to set up your company. Knowing your brand will make sure you remain true to yourself as you navigate these other choices, make hires, build teams, grow.”
When Credit Karma launched in 2008, credit score companies weren’t just unsexy – they were loathed.
“No one yelled, ‘That’s bullshit!’ It was the big vote of confidence in the values we built the brand around.
If you’re building a company in a less engaging market, creating an exciting brand around it can seem daunting.
Despite all we’ve written about branding on First Round Review, we still hear from companies that believe they can’t build a compelling brand around what they’re doing – it’s too niche, too technical, too wonky, too boring to communicate, they say.
A brand is sexy if it attracts attention from your specific audience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Dearth of I.P.O.s, but It’s Not the Fault of Red Tape”

The JOBS Act has done nothing to revive the market for small companies, those with a market capitalization of under $75 million.
Jay Ritter, a professor at the University of Florida, has argued that the dearth of initial public offerings has been caused by companies selling out quicker.
A third possibility is that companies simply no longer need the public market.
The JOBS Act allowed companies to expand the number of shareholders and still be private, a change that encouraged companies to remain private.
Another possible reason is that companies are shying away from the public markets to avoid shareholder activism, short-termism and the glare of public scrutiny.
We could explore more novel ways of bringing companies to the public markets.
Special purpose acquisitions companies – those created to buy a private company and bring it public – have attracted criticism, including from me.
The better solution is to push more companies to the public markets.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jerks and the Start-Ups They Ruin”

Uber’s public downfall began in February, when Susan Fowler, a former engineer at the company, wrote about enduring sexual harassment and discrimination there.
Mr. Kalanick’s own bro-hood became part of the story when a video surfaced showing him berating a Uber driver who complained that Uber’s price cuts had driven him into bankruptcy.
Mr. Kalanick has apologized and vowed to “Grow up.” Most important, Uber has announced that it is planning to hire a chief operating officer, ideally a steady hand like Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook.
His record at Uber includes racking up enormous losses – reportedly $5 billion over the last two years.
Uber’s collapse should not come as a surprise but it does offer a lesson: Toxic workplace culture and rotten financial performance go hand-in-hand.
It’s possible for a boorish jerk to run a successful company, but jerks do best when surrounded by non-jerks, and bros do best when they hire seasoned executives to help them.
A crash at Uber, the most high profile tech start-up in the world, could provide the jolt that finally brings the tech industry back to its senses.
An Opinion article about tech company culture last Sunday misstated which tech companies are run by only men.

The orginal article.