Summary of “Women in Tech Speak Frankly on Culture of Harassment”

The tech industry has long suffered a gender imbalance, with companies such as Google and Facebook acknowledging how few women were in their ranks.
The investor has been accused of sexually harassing entrepreneurs while he worked at three different venture firms in the past seven years, often in meetings in which the women were presenting their companies to him.
Several of Silicon Valley’s top venture capitalists and technologists, including Reid Hoffman, a founder of LinkedIn, condemned Mr. Caldbeck’s behavior last week and called for investors to sign a “Decency pledge.” Binary has since collapsed, with Mr. Caldbeck leaving the firm and investors pulling money out of its funds.
The chain of events has emboldened more women to talk publicly about the treatment they said they had endured from tech investors.
Ms. Pao lost the case, but it sparked a debate about whether women in tech should publicly call out unequal treatment.
“Having had several women come out earlier, including Ellen Pao and me, most likely paved the way and primed the industry that these things indeed happen,” said Gesche Haas, an entrepreneur who said she was propositioned for sex by an investor, Pavel Curda, in 2014.
At a mostly male tech gathering in Las Vegas in 2009, Susan Wu, an entrepreneur and investor, said that Mr. Sacca, an investor and former Google executive, touched her face without her consent in a way that made her uncomfortable.
“After being made aware of instances of Dave having inappropriate behavior with women in the tech community, we have been making changes internally,” 500 Startups said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Essay: Cultural Appropriation Is Indefensible”

Last week, the New York Times published an op-ed titled “In Defense of Cultural Appropriation” in which writer Kenan Malik attempted to extol the virtues of artistic appropriation and chastise those who would stand in the way of necessary “Cultural engagement.” What would have happened, he argues, had Elvis Presley not been able to swipe the sounds of black musicians?
Malik is not the first person to defend cultural appropriation.
The truth is that cultural appropriation is indefensible.
The issue here is that Niedzviecki conflated cultural appropriation and the practice of writing characters with very different identities from yourself – and they’re not the same thing.
Cultural appropriation can feel hard to get a handle on, because boiling it down to a two-sentence dictionary definition does no one any favors.
You will find many who say: Don’t write characters from minority or marginalized identities if you are not going to put in the hard work to do it well and avoid cultural appropriation and other harmful outcomes.
All of this lies at the root of why cultural appropriation is indefensible.
Cultural appropriation does damage, and it should be something writers and other artists work hard to avoid, not compete with each other to achieve.

The orginal article.

Summary of “University of Rochester football player kidnapped, tortured for 40 hours”

Hughes acknowledged to police that she had been with Kollias.
In another call, Kollias asks, “There is no way I could get the $1,500 just transferred over to the debit card for withdrawal?” When the customer service agent tells Kollias they can’t move money until Monday, he responds, “OK. Um, that’s fine, I guess. I’ll just call back on Monday.” The customer service agent, unable to see the gun next to Kollias’ head, tells him, “Have a great weekend.”
City investigators spotted strange activity in Kollias’ bank account – thousands of dollars were being withdrawn from ATMs. Surveillance video from an ATM less than a mile from where Kollias was being held would later show Gigliotti’s blue Dodge Dart pulling up to the machine.
Police Chief Michael Ciminelli, a Rochester native with 12 years of experience with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, says he believes not being able to transfer money on the weekend might have saved Kollias’ life.
“On Sunday morning, the masked men cranked up the music before entering the room where Kollias was being held.”Just came in extremely angry,” Kollias remembers.
Their captors had boarded up the windows, making it impossible to tell whether it was light out, but Kollias kept track of time by listening to the football games he could hear through the walls.
Kollias says he believes none of this would have happened if the university had cracked down on Smith’s earlier drug activities – and if the Division III coaches he played for weren’t so blinded by Smith’s football talent.
Even though his football career is now over, Kollias still has the piano.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Infowars and Goop sell the same exact pseudoscientific “wellness” products”

Near the end of a profile of Amanda Chantal Bacon, founder of the “Wellness” brand Moon Juice, the New York Times Magazine noted that many of the alternative-medicine ingredients in her products are sold-with very different branding-on the Infowars store.
Moon Juice is frequently recommended by Gwyneth Paltrow’s wellness blog, Goop; it’s a favorite of Hollywood celebrities and others who can afford things like $25 “Activated cashews.” Infowars, on the other hand, is a dark corner of the American right, heavy on guns, light on government intervention, and still very mad at Obama.
We looked at the ingredients used in products sold on the Infowars store, and compared them to products on the wellness shops Moon Juice and Goop.
Goop uses bacopa in a supplement pack called “Why am I so Effing Tired;” Infowars sticks it in its “Brain Force Plus.” The science, based on animal studies, shows some preliminary-but contradictory-evidence of improvements to memory and brain function.
Goop sells cordyceps as a dietary supplement; Infowars infuses them into its “Wake Up America” coffee.
Both Moon Juice and Infowars sell it blended with a bunch of other herbal medicines so it would be difficult to isolate eleuthero’s possible positive effects.
” Both Moon Juice and Infowars sell it as an ingredient in products targeting an increased libido.
Infowars says the element “supports a healthy thyroid gland, supports the immune system, is essential for metabolic pathways, and much more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “They Built the First Phone You Loved. Where in the World Is Nokia Now?”

In 2013 it agreed to sell off its phone business, which employed 32,000, to Microsoft Corp. “It’s evident Nokia doesn’t have the resources to fund the required acceleration across mobile phones and smart devices,” said the company’s chairman, Risto Siilasmaa, in announcing the sale.
Every G since then, including 5G, is a descendant of NMT. At first, Motorola dominated the nascent global industry, but Nokia overtook them in 1999, partly by switching to a faster and more secure digital system while its American rival clung to analog.
Apple Inc. and the Korean phone makers Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc. left Nokia far behind.
Siilasmaa founded local cybersecurity company F-Secure Corp., and when he was brought on at Nokia, the phone maker was listing dangerously.
Nokia CEO Stephen Elop, who had come from Microsoft, went back with the phone business, and Siilasmaa took over as interim CEO. The deal was a minor national trauma in Finland.
Last year, Microsoft, faring no better than Nokia with the handset business, sold it to a subsidiary of Chinese phone maker Foxconn Technology Group.
The company has clashed repeatedly with Apple over those patents, resolving the most recent battle in May. The companies also announced that Nokia will provide networking services to Apple, while Apple stores will carry some Nokia items.
Even after the Alcatel-Lucent deal, Nokia still trails Huawei in sales of networking equipment, and business has slowed in recent years as carriers have pared their purchasing in advance of the transition to 5G. The company is also trying to edge back into the consumer electronics business.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s AR is closer to reality than Google’s”

Next up on Apple’s agenda is augmented reality, the act of superimposing digital data and visuals atop a live video feed of your surroundings – something that Google, Microsoft, and many others have been experimenting with for a long time.
Apple is far from being able to claim it invented AR, but its new ARKit in iOS 11 is already showing signs to suggest that Apple will help bring AR into the mainstream faster and better than anyone else.
Apple’s AR will immediately reach millions of people who already have the requisite hardware.
Google’s Tango is about the future whereas Apple’s ARKit is about the present.
Considering how little time it took to develop two convincingly accurate AR measuring apps with the iOS 11 beta, and reading the comments from their makers, Apple also appears to have an advantage in the ease of development with ARKit.
It’s exciting to think that there are still three months before the release of the next iPhone and the accompanying finalization of iOS 11, by which time Apple’s big-budget app developer partners are likely to have a deluge of AR-enabled apps for people to play with.
Apple’s iPhone is more convenient than Google’s Project Tango devices and with iOS 11 it’ll have much better AR capabilities than its nearest premium Android rivals.
So if we’re looking for the AR innovator that will take the technology into the mainstream, Apple once again looks like the likeliest suspect.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An 11-Step Guide to Saving the Clippers”

Kudos to Doc for saving the Clippers franchise during the Sterling debacle; without him, a rudderless and distraught organization would have imploded.
Anyone who coaches an NBA team AND runs an NBA team fails miserably.
You want the Banana Boat reunion? You want LeBron, Paul George, and Russell Westbrook? Pick your superteam! Pick your coach! Pick your GM!The Clippers couldn’t win a title last season, and they definitely couldn’t win one this season.
The city’s love for the Lakers became more pronounced - you could feel it every time a Clipper got booed at a Dodgers game, or every time a more famous NBA team passed through Clipperland and drew 6,000-7,000 fans.
In the old days, people bought Clippers season tickets because it was a cost-effective way to see NBA basketball, and stars on other teams.
Two NBA teams, two baseball teams, two NFL teams, two MLS teams, two NHL teams, two major college football/basketball programs, and every conceivable musical act you’d ever want to see.
Seattle not having an NBA team is dumber than James Dolan having an NBA team.
The truth is, Los Angeles shouldn’t have two basketball teams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Monocle’s View From Nowhere”

In the March 2017 redesign issue there are “Collaboration” ad packages with the nations of both Thailand and Portugal; each package appears next to unpaid Monocle editorial content about said countries.
Under an umbrella entity incorporated in Switzerland called Winkorp, Brûlé’s ad agency, Winkreative, sells creative services to companies that also often buy ads in Monocle.
On top of the Winkorp cake, he has added Monocle-branded clothing lines that can be bought through the magazine; hardcover books about home decoration and nation building; a 24/7 streaming radio station; retail stores around the world; and cafés in Tokyo and London that serve up a wan, placeless cuisine of Monocle chicken katsu sandwiches and Monocle taco salad bowls.
“If you believe you are a citizen of the world,” British Prime Minister Theresa May pronounced last year, “You are a citizen of nowhere.” May became prime minister in no small part because she argued that the people of her country couldn’t trust the Monocle class-not just the Eurocrats in Brussels, but also the global financial elite and PR gurus like her predecessor, David Cameron-who were too untethered to act in the best interests of the nation.
Monocle views the world as a single, utopian marketplace, linked by digital technology and first-class air travel, bestridden by compelling brands and their executives.
Every Monocle reader, regardless of where they live or work, should want the same things and seek them out wherever they go in the world, forming an identity made up not of places or people but of desirable products: German newspapers, Thai beach festivals, Norwegian television.
A recent article in The Guardian about Lisbon described the city as embracing “Monocle urbanism,” a shorthand for all that the magazine glorifies: plentiful local culture, a relaxed pace of life, modernized airports, and co-working spaces.
Who doesn’t like a good Japanese leather origami bag? But if nationalists have a point in decrying the “Global citizenship” that Monocle epitomizes, it lies in the magazine’s subtle approach to cultural homogenization.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sexual harassment claims prompt venture capitalists to apologize, change policies and head to counseling”

Mark Suster, among Los Angeles’ most well-known venture capitalists, says he never fathomed that fellow investors would cross a line and sexually harass entrepreneurs.
Venture capitalists, the influential financiers who provide cash to start-ups, have begun making pledges, pursuing policy changes and even stepping down amid a flurry of accusations.
Venture capital firms, long dominated by male leadership, have slowly added more women to their ranks following a high-profile gender discrimination trial in 2015.
Attaching names to both victims and perpetrators has called attention more than ever before in tech to the massive power venture capitalists have over entrepreneurs who need their backing to pursue business ideas.
His action comes after a week of sexual harassment accusations against San Francisco venture capitalist Justin Caldbeck.
Encounters between entrepreneurs and investors fall into a tricky corner of employment law, though legal experts contend that sexual harassment litigation can pass muster in such situations in California.
In a reference-check call he received this week, an investor weighing a bet on a venture capital firm was asking more difficult questions than he’s ever encountered in such a call.
Several venture capital firms posted tweets in recent days in support of a “Decency Pledge” promulgated by LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Working Class”

As the political scientists Adam Przeworski and John Sprague explained in their 1986 book Paper Stones, social democratic parties, built on the assumption that the working class would grow steadily in size and power them to majority, instead were forced to face the unexpected stagnation and decline of their proletarian bases.
In a recent piece in Slate, Yascha Mounk-director of the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change-wrote that the Democrats should focus on “States where appealing to the white working class is not as important as increasing turnout among minority groups and appealing to moderate voters in the suburbs.” Note the slippage: whatever program will appeal to the entity known as the “White working class” will not appeal to “Minority groups,” who are joined together in this analysis with “Moderate voters in the suburbs.” Has Mounk ever spoken to a working-class American outside of a customer transaction? It is difficult to imagine how the categories with which he operates could possibly have survived such an encounter.
The American working class is, after all, less white than the rest of American society, and, by all survey evidence, has more left-wing political views-by dint of its composition by race and gender, as well as its class experiences.
While Democrats have been pleading for the votes of suburban college graduates, a new working class has been in formation all the while.
While the idea of a new working class is not yet widely accepted, its distinguishing features are, on their own terms, familiar.
The working class has dissolved and reformed many times in history, and will continue to do so, with new grievances and opportunities at each juncture.
Today’s new working class will not come into being and simply resuscitate the forms of organization and collective action inherited from the postwar AFL-CIO. We probably won’t wake up one day to find that SEIU has become an organ of mass popular radicalism.
As the Trump administration prepares to shred the remnants of the safety net that it once promised to protect, we might see political rumbling in the sectors of the new working class bearing the immediate brunt: the people who care for the sick, the old, the young, and the poor.

The orginal article.