Summary of “Elon Musk mastered ‘learning transfer'”

Based on my review of Musk’s life and the academic literature related to learning and expertise, I’m convinced that we should ALL learn across multiple fields in order to increase our odds of breakthrough success.
Learning across multiple fields provides an information advantage because most people focus on just one field.
Musk’s ‘learning transfer’ superpower Starting from his early teenage years, Musk would read through two books per day in various disciplines according to his brother, Kimbal Musk.
Elon Musk is also good at a very specific type of learning that most others aren’t even aware of - learning transfer.
Learning transfer is taking what we learn in one context and applying it to another.
At the deepest level, what we can learn from Elon Musk’s story is that we shouldn’t accept the dogma that specialization is the best or only path toward career success and impact.
As we build up a reservoir of “First principles” and associate those principles with different fields, we suddenly gain the superpower of being able to go into a new field we’ve never learned before, and quickly make unique contributions.
Want to take to learn like Musk? I created a free learning how to learn webinar you might like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Pittsburgh Gets a Tech Makeover”

Much has been made of the “Food boom” in Pittsburgh, and the city has long had a thriving arts scene.
Perhaps the secret, underlying driver for both the economy and the cool factor – the reason Pittsburgh now gets mentioned alongside Brooklyn and Portland, Ore., as an urban hot spot for millennials – isn’t chefs or artists but geeks.
In a 2014 article in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Mayor Bill Peduto compared Carnegie Mellon, along with the University of Pittsburgh, to the iron ore factories that made this city an industrial power in the 19th century.
The big tech firms, along with their highly skilled, highly paid workers, have made Pittsburgh younger and more international and helped to transform once-derelict neighborhoods like Lawrenceville and East Liberty.
Google Pittsburgh, with its more than 500 employees, also has part of its offices in East Liberty, as does AlphaLab, a start-up accelerator.
Kamal Nigam, a Carnegie Mellon graduate who is the head of Google Pittsburgh, said that a decade ago, workers hired by the company had family or personal connections to the city.
Ms. Yang’s field of research is in computer programming languages, and, as she put it, “C.M.U. is the best place for the kind of work I want to do.” When she was offered an assistant professor position in the School of Computer Science and discovered a changed Pittsburgh on her visits back, Ms. Yang accepted the job and returned last August.
While young, cool Pittsburgh may be a recent development, the research at Carnegie Mellon in the field of artificial intelligence has a long history.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ole Miss Rebels Hugh Freeze ouster the result of an odd pairing between Houston Nutt attorney and Mississippi State Bulldogs writer”

STARKVILLE, Miss. – The man who helped take down Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze is a lifelong Mississippi State fan who attended his first Bulldogs game 37 years ago and has the university’s logo tattooed on his left hand.
Robertson called Thomas Mars, an attorney who is representing former Ole Miss coach Houston Nutt in his defamation lawsuit against Ole Miss. Mars had been introduced to Robertson through a third party he found while doing online research into Nutt’s case.
To understand what has transpired in the last couple of years in Oxford, Mississippi, it helps to know the nature of the rivalry between Ole Miss and Mississippi State.
Loyd, who represents former Ole Miss staffer Barney Farrar, and who said he played junior college football with Mississippi State president Mark Keenum, all but predicted Freeze’s ouster a month ago.
Robertson, who has covered Mississippi State sports since 2001, said he and Mars stumbled upon the number when they were looking for another call – a conversation between Freeze and a sportswriter.
Mars claims Ole Miss officials violated that agreement by allegedly defaming Nutt and blaming him for most of the Rebels’ NCAA troubles in off-the-record conversations with sports reporters, including from ESPN. Along with Robertson’s help, Mars also enlisted the services of Fred Burton, a longtime counterterrorism agent with the U.S. Department of State.
Many MSU fans accused the Rebels of cheating in recruiting during their rise to national prominence under Freeze, while some Ole Miss fans believe the Bulldogs helped orchestrate many of the more serious allegations of rules violations.
Robertson attended his first Mississippi State game on Nov. 1, 1980, when he watched the Bulldogs upset No. 1 Alabama 6-3 in Jackson, Mississippi.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook worker living in garage to Zuckerberg: challenges are right outside your door”

A worker in one of Facebook’s cafeterias, they have also raised an important question: “Is he going to come here?”.
Here, on a quiet street of modest bungalows, Nicole and her husband Victor, who also works at a Facebook cafeteria, live in a two-car garage with their children, aged nine, eight and four.
On Friday, the couple were among about 500 Facebook cafeteria workers who elected to join a union, Unite Here Local 19.
At times, the challenges make the couple nostalgic for the days before Facebook moved to Menlo Park.
Now she works at cafeterias with names like “Epic” and “Living the Dream”, and the distance between the two classes of Facebook worker can feel immense.
Facebook recently held a “Bring your kids to work” day, but cafeteria workers’ children were not allowed.
A spokeswoman for Facebook said none of the company’s contingent or contract workers have access to facilities such as clinics, gyms, or bring-your-child-to-work days, but that other policies were a matter between the contractor and the workers.
“People think, oh, you’re working for Facebook, you’re doing great,” Victor said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Luka Doncic Might Be the Best European NBA Prospect of the 21st Century”

Despite just turning 18 in February, the young Slovenian is one of the best players on one of the best teams in Europe.
Instead of competing in the Under-18 European Championships or the Under-19 World Championships, he was a key player on a Real Madrid team that made it to the Euroleague Final Four in May. The Euroleague is the basketball version of the Champions League, featuring the best teams from the top domestic leagues in Europe, and Doncic was dominant in his time on the floor, with per-40 minute averages of 15.7 points, 9.0 rebounds, 8.5 assists, and 1.7 steals a game on 43.4 percent shooting.
He’s the most accomplished European prospect since Ricky Rubio, and he’s a much more complete player.
Doncic signed a pro contract with Madrid at the age of 13, and he was on its senior team by 16, the third-youngest player to ever appear in the Liga ACB. European coaches play deeper rotations than coaches do in the U.S., and Doncic is playing on a stacked team that features former NBA players like Rudy Fernández, Anthony Randolph, Jeffery Taylor, Andrés Nocioni, and Gustavo Ayón, so he averaged only 20 minutes per game, but he was a featured player when he was on the floor.
Doncic will have to continue to improve as a shooter as he transitions to the NBA, since he won’t have the same athletic edge there that he has against most European players.
The ideal outcome for Doncic in the NBA would be to play next to multipositional defenders who allow him to guard the worst perimeter player on the opposing team.
Euroleague players as productive statistically as Doncic rarely bust in the NBA, and the consensus around the league is that his size and skill make him a pretty safe selection.
“There’s a good chance we get to next April and [Doncic] is the most polarizing player in the draft,” said Elan Vinokurov, the president of EV Hoops, a scouting service used by many NBA teams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Your Brain Is Like the Cosmic Web”

Christof Koch, a leading researcher on consciousness and the human brain, has famously called the brain “The most complex object in the known universe.” It’s not hard to see why this might be true.
The first results from our comparison are truly surprising: Not only are the complexities of the brain and cosmic web actually similar, but so are their structures.
If the cosmic web is at least as complex as any of its constituent parts, we might naively conclude that it must be at least as complex as the brain.
The eye immediately grasps some similarity between images of the cosmic web and the brain.
For the complex networks of the cosmic web and of the human brain, on the other hand, the observed behavior is not fractal, which can be interpreted as evidence of the emergence of scale-dependent, self-organized structures.
Estimating the complexity of the human brain is much more difficult, because global simulations of the brain remain an unmet challenge.
Based on the latest analysis of the connectivity of the brain network, independent studies have concluded that the total memory capacity of the adult human brain should be around 2.5 petabytes, not far from the 1-10 petabyte range estimated for the cosmic web!
It is truly a remarkable fact that the cosmic web is more similar to the human brain than it is to the interior of a galaxy; or that the neuronal network is more similar to the cosmic web than it is to the interior of a neuronal body.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Finally Start Living on Your Own Terms”

Like most people, you’ll be seduced by the best thing that comes around.
According to neuroscience research, the more you express love, the more other people feel love for you.
Sadly, people are taught absurd mindsets about being vulnerable and loving in relationships.
“Surround yourself with people who remind you more of your future than your past.” - Dan Sullivan.
Even more fundamental is: What types of people are you comfortable around?
Unless you live in a big city, I’m baffled how many people pay outlandish amounts on rent each month.
Instead of living life on their own terms, they’d rather respond to other people’s agendas.
According to psychological research, people who make their bed in the morning are happier and more successful than those who don’t.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Christopher Nolan Talks Making ‘Dunkirk’ Movie, ‘Inception’ and Plot Twists”

You do very easily get lost in your own ideas, or your own enthusiasm.
Dunkirk is a new step for you-a film based on a true story.
Dunkirk is a story that British people were raised on-it’s in our bones.
It’s a little surprising that no one has told the story in modern cinema.
What I learned very early on, and I’m very grateful for the lesson, is that I could only be making films for the sake of making films.
To only engage in telling a story for the process of telling the story, not for the gold star at the end.
The truth is you have to hang on to your own belief.
At the end of the day, all you really have is your own belief, your own passion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Christopher Nolan’s Wartime Epic”

Dunkirk is stitched into the British mythology of the Second World War and, even now, occasional mention is made of “The Dunkirk spirit,” yet the legend has never travelled far, and for obvious reasons.
Something about Dunkirk appeals to the peculiar British love of the gallantly narrow squeak, and, in the deployment of the Little Ships, to an abiding fondness for the doughty and the makeshift.
You can understand Nolan’s interest; born in London, in 1970, he belongs to what is probably the last generation to have been reared on the rousing fable of Dunkirk.
The Mole refers to a concrete jetty jutting into Dunkirk Harbor, whereas the air is the domain of a Spitfire pilot.
Out in the English Channel, and heading to Dunkirk, is the Moonstone, skippered by Dawson, her owner.
How to account for the impact that is made by “Dunkirk”? After all, there are so many ways in which the film falls short, and so many directions in which Nolan decides not to tack.
Nolan has described “Dunkirk” as less a war film than a survival film, but it’s even more basic than that, in the way it lures us in and keeps us hooked.
Although “Dunkirk” is not as labyrinthine as Nolan’s “Memento” or “Inception”, its strike rate upon our senses is rarely in doubt, and there is a beautiful justice in watching it end, as it has to, in flames.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Magic Can Be Normal”

The production, directed by Desdemona Chiang, was described as The Winter’s Tale “From an Asian and Asian American perspective,” and the cast featured Asian American artists in a majority of the lead roles.
At first blush, bringing an eight-year-old to one of William Shakespeare’s quirkier plays in an effort to help her see herself, an Asian American girl, in popular culture did seem a rather odd decision.
For all my effort, it still comes to probably less than one percent of what my kids read. Perhaps it’s not so surprising that when I had the chance to take my daughter to see a company teeming with Asian American Shakespeareans, I grabbed it-even if it was “Too weird” and “Too old” for her; even if the original source material wasn’t written with her in mind at all.
As we watched actors of three different generations portray mother, father, daughter, and little son, I tried to remember the last time I saw so many Asian American women in a single work.
In the production, Bohemia is a multicultural New World immigrant utopia, and Sicilia is “a kind of Asian Pangaea” represented by a diverse group of Asian American artists.
“With race-conscious casting, like we had, we’re not ignoring race. We had all these different aspects of Asianness in the company: a Korean Hermione, Korean and Filipino lords, a South Asian Paulina. So Asian American identity, the nuances of diaspora and migration-all of these topics were part of the conversation with the company from the beginning.”
As Pisasale points out, presenting an iconic work of Shakespeare’s from an Asian and Asian American perspective can help poke holes in the very idea of “The Western canon” and what it means-and such interrogation is a good, even necessary thing.
I’m still glad that, from now on, when my daughter thinks of Shakespeare, she’ll be able to imagine Asian American players.

The orginal article.