Summary of “To Raise Better Kids, Say No”

In one study, researchers asked elementary school children to help Bobo the Bear, a stuffed animal, reach his toy lion using some materials: building blocks, a pencil, an eraser, a ball, a magnet, a toy car and a wooden box.
As children grow older, their brains develop in ways that should make it easier for them to solve this type of problem.
The oldest children in the study reached the correct solution faster, on average, than the younger participants, who were 5.But there was one condition in the experiment when the younger children ended up outperforming the older kids.
Upon seeing the box acting like a container, the older children struggled to expand it to anything beyond a container.
For the younger children, the box remained just as flexible a resource as it was before.
Witness the elaborate coming of age parties people across cultures and income levels throw for their children, even if it means going into debt.
To be sure, I’m not suggesting denying children a generous supply of things they actually need like healthy meals, warm clothes and love.
People assigned to the scarcity group had better solutions compared to the abundance group.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Psychology shows it’s a big mistake to base our self-worth on our professional achievements”

Contemporary society has some very wrong-headed ideas about what constitutes success.
For my book, The Power of Meaning, I spoke to many people who defined their identity and self-worth by their educational and career achievements.
These are the criteria that we should be using to gauge our own success in life and the success of others, especially our children.
As he dealt with the fallout of the failed IPO, Tjan realized that his definition of success had led him down the wrong path.
At the time, he assumed success meant, in his word, “Winning.” He writes: “We’d defined our success, by what an initial public offering could bring us, rather than by any of the meaningful roles or innovations we had created, or their impact on the world.” In time, he realized that true success lies in, he said, “Using your strengths in the service of a higher calling”-in other words, generativity.
“I don’t want my children thinking about success in terms of winning and losing,” Tjan told me.
He had rewritten his story about what success was.
Or we can embrace a different definition of success, one rooted in generativity-in doing the quiet work of maintaining our “Stores” in our own little corners of the world, and making sure that someone will mind them after we’re gone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “6 Facts That Will Clear Up Your Confusing Life”

I got a degree in broadcast journalism, failed in that field after less than two years, took a series of minimum-wage office jobs, attempted to go back to college, washed out, put myself deep in debt to earn several PC repair certifications, failed to get a job doing that, all the while spending 30-40 hours of my spare time writing comedy on the internet for no pay.
In the few years before Cracked hired me as an editor, I had gotten turned down for jobs working in a Social Security office and a UPS warehouse, and considered myself lucky to have worked my way up to being the lowest-level supervisor in an insurance company’s data entry center.
You know what? In this ridiculous job, I’ve wound up using every bit of that shit.
The ability to research and fact-check, write on a deadline, create and manage spreadsheets, give clear quality control feedback, and to adapt to an industry that abruptly changes every six months.
Hkuchera/iStockAnd there’s nothing like learning to fight off genital-eating wolves to prep you for online feedback.
As far as I can tell, that’s all you can do – keep trying, keep learning from your mistakes, keep listening to other people in order to learn from theirs.
Most importantly of all, realize that you’re not lost in the woods waiting for your life to start.
This is your life, and some of the shit you hate now is the same shit you’ll miss later.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Be the Most Persuasive Person in the Room: 9 Things Highly Influential People Always Do, According to Science”

Every successful person I know is extremely good at persuading other people.
So how can you become more persuasive – in a genuine and authentic way?
According to University of Illinois professor Daniel O’Keefe, sharing one or two opposing viewpoints is more persuasive than sticking solely to the benefits of your position.
The people you hope to convince are more likely to be persuaded when they know you understand that they might have misgivings.
While it’s tempting to use scare tactics, positive-outcome statements tend to be more persuasive.
Even the most skeptical person will be partly persuaded by another person’s confidence.
Science says you’re likely to be a little more persuasive.
If you’re a guy who hopes to persuade another guy you know well, definitely communicate in person.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hokusai: the Great Wave that swept the world”

Had Katsushika Hokusai died when he was struck by lightning at the age of 50 in 1810, he would be remembered as a popular artist of the ukiyo-e, or “Floating world” school of Japanese art, but hardly the great figure we know today.
His late blooming was spectacular – it was only in his 70s that he made his most celebrated print series, Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji, including the famous Great Wave, an image that subsequently swept over the world.
In their observation and invention they have been compared to Rembrandt and Van Gogh, and rightly so for the thrilling panorama they provide both of the world and of Hokusai’s imagination.
Hokusai gradually introduced colour into the series, delicate pinks and darker shadows, to show the illumination of the world as the sun creeps up over the horizon.
That the Great Wave became the best known print in the west was in large part due to Hokusai’s formative experience of European art.
I would love to see an impression of Hokusai’s delicately coloured print hung next to Géricault’s Raft of the Medusa, painted just over a decade previously, in which a similar large wave is about to crash down on frail humanity.
Hokusai signed his Thirty-Six Views with the name Iitsu, adding for clarification that he was “The former Hokusai”.
The drawings are brilliantly conceived, and the prints beautifully made, the woodblock carvers reproducing Hokusai’s line so accurately that we think we are looking at the drawings themselves, rather than carved and printed copies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s no shame in a $100M startup”

Tech journalists want to write stories about companies that spell million with a “B.” Investors at billion-dollar funds want to deploy $50 million into winning companies, and $100 million exits are seen as consolation prizes instead of reasons to cheer.
Y Combinator’s Paul Graham is one of the most influential venture capitalists of the last 10 years, yet his startup Viaweb sold for “Just” $49 million.
Belittling $100M success stories Not only is selling a company for $100 million often scoffed at by VCs, at times it is outright mocked by the startup community.
The disdain for “Small” $100 million sales is so strong there’s even an Urban Dictionary entry for selling your startup for too little money – it’s called “Pulling a Patzer.” No seriously, go look it up.
You might have a company with $10 million last year in gross revenue that earned a $50 million valuation in its last round.
In a normal environment, that company might raise $20 million on an $80 million pre-money valuation as the next step up.
With only $10 million in revenue and very thin margins, the company has sold its option of a $500 million exit.
In some cases, selling for tens of millions of dollars can be more lucrative for founders than selling for hundreds of millions, or even billions of dollars.

The orginal article.

Summary of “John Grisham’s Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Popular Fiction”

This necessitates the use of a dreaded device commonly called an outline.
Writers waste years pursuing stories that eventually don’t work.3.
DO – WRITE YOUR ONE PAGE EACH DAY AT THE SAME PLACE AND TIME.Early morning, lunch break, on the train, late at night – it doesn’t matter.
Find the extra hour, go to the same place, shut the door.
DON’T – WRITE A PROLOGUE.Prologues are usually gimmicks to hook the reader.
DON’T – KEEP A THESAURUS WITHIN REACHING DISTANCE. I know, I know, there’s one at your fingertips.
There are three types of words: words we know; words we should know; words nobody knows.
DO – READ EACH SENTENCE AT LEAST THREE TIMES IN SEARCH OF WORDS TO CUT.Most writers use too many words, and why not? We have unlimited space and few constraints.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple Is Working on a Dedicated Chip to Power AI on Devices”

The chip, known internally as the Apple Neural Engine, would improve the way the company’s devices handle tasks that would otherwise require human intelligence – such as facial recognition and speech recognition, said the person, who requested anonymity discussing a product that hasn’t been made public.
“Two of the areas that Apple is betting its future on require AI,” said Gene Munster, former Apple analyst and co-founder of venture capital firm Loup Ventures.
Apple devices currently handle complex artificial intelligence processes with two different chips: the main processor and the graphics chip.
The new chip would let Apple offload those tasks onto a dedicated module designed specifically for demanding artificial intelligence processing, allowing Apple to improve battery performance.
Should Apple bring the chip out of testing and development, it would follow other semiconductor makers that have already introduced dedicated AI chips.
The Apple AI chip is designed to make significant improvements to Apple’s hardware over time, and the company plans to eventually integrate the chip into many of its devices, including the iPhone and iPad, according to the person with knowledge of the matter.
The company is also said to discuss updated laptops with faster chips from Intel Corp. An AI chip would join a growing list of processors that Apple has created in-house.
It has since released dedicated processors to power the Apple Watch, the motion sensors across its products, the wireless components inside of its AirPods, and the fingerprint scanner in the MacBook Pro.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple Park’s Tree Whisperer”

The encounter would lead to Muffly becoming the senior arborist at Apple, Inc., in charge of choosing, locating and planting the 9,000 trees that justify Apple’s choice to call its 175-acre campus a park - and in making Apple Park a leaf-and-blossom tribute to the CEO who designed it but would not live to see it built.
Muffly had come to the Cupertino office not long after receiving a cold call on his phone while working a $125 job pruning lemon trees in a Menlo Park backyard.
“That’s what I’ve been doing - planting fruit trees, oak trees,” he said.
“There was a kind of tree that I wanted to use and one that was more common,” says Muffly.
Because the trees they plant might well live a century or more, Muffly suggested they use native trees as the backbone of the ecosystem and then diversify to other oak genetics.
When Jobs presented his plan to the Cupertino City Council in June 2011, he said that Apple would add to the 3,700 existing trees for a total of 6,000.
Muffly looked at the redwoods at some abandoned Christmas tree farms up on Skyline, but the soil was too rocky to grow them to Apple’s specifications.
“So I sent all my little tree elves to help me, telling them we need big trees we can transport to the site. Next thing I know we’re finding these in two abandoned Christmas tree farms in the Mojave Desert, Yermo, and Adelanto. Who knew there were Christmas tree farms in the Mojave?” Apple actually bought the Yermo site.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Oldest Homo sapiens bones ever found shake foundations of the human story”

Fossils recovered from an old mine on a desolate mountain in Morocco have rocked one of the most enduring foundations of the human story: that Homo sapiens arose in a cradle of humankind in East Africa 200,000 years ago.
Hublin said the extreme age of the bones makes them the oldest known specimens of modern humans and poses a major challenge to the idea that the earliest members of our species evolved in a “Garden of Eden” in East Africa one hundred thousand years later.
Today, the Neanderthals are considered a sister group that lived alongside, and even bred with, our modern human ancestors.
“When we found the skull and mandible I was emotional. They are only fossils, but they have been human beings and very quickly you make a connection with these people who lived and died here 300,000 years ago.”
In the first of two papers published in Nature on Wednesday, the researchers describe how they compared the freshly-excavated fossils with those of modern humans, Neanderthals and ancient human relatives that lived up to 1.8m years ago.
“The idea is that early Homo sapiens dispersed around the continent and elements of human modernity appeared in different places, and so different parts of Africa contributed to the emergence of what we call modern humans today,” he said.
Lee Berger, whose team recently discovered the 300,000 year-old Homo naledi, an archaic-looking human relative, near the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage site outside Johannesburg, said dating the Jebel Irhoud bones was thrilling, but is unconvinced that modern humans lived all over Africa so long ago.
“But Jessica Thompson, an anthropologist at Emory University in Atlanta, said the new results show just how incredible the Jebel Irhoud site is.”These fossils are the rarest of the rare because the human fossil record from this time period in Africa is so poorly represented.

The orginal article.