Summary of “I do whatever I want at work and I haven’t been fired yet”

If you can make a decision and you don’t think it’s going to get you fired, just do it.
Basecamp operates without much in the way of formal decision making processes.
The amount of implicit “Decision making authority” differs for each person, depending on role, tenure, etc.
The same basic rule-of-thumb applies: if you aren’t worried that making the decision is going to be disastrous, you have authority to make it.
You made the “Right” decision and the company benefited, hurray! This represents the vast majority of decisions that are made at Basecamp, because we hire intelligent people and those people are making these decisions.
We don’t have “Bet the company” level decisions come up very often.
Our system of granting decision making authority - in which we don’t explicitly grant decision making authority, but let each person assert the level of decision making authority they’re comfortable with - is built on a certain level of trust.
Most of the time, no one has concerns, because you’re a smart, capable person who is going to make good decisions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to make a friend fast”

What we know as human society is held together by interpersonal relationships – on one hand, it’s the give-and-take equilibria between persons or social groups and the expectations of reciprocally beneficial behavior, and on the other, the feelings of closeness, trust, and personalistic self-disclosure.
The study I’m referring to is the Experimental Generation of Interpersonal Closeness: A Procedure and Some Preliminary Findings, and in in the authors present a superficially reliable-looking method of creating close relationships.
Id est, interpersonal relationships of two strangers who end up reporting a substantial amount of closeness in their relationship after a guided 45-minute conversation.
To define closeness, or intimacy of a relationship, they use something called “The inclusion of other in the self,” which represent a state in which each subject of a relationship feels their innermost self to be validated, understood, and cared for by the other.
Most can agree on closeness having to involve some aspect of feeling close to have any chance of enduring and improving.
Compared to a survey on the closeness of the “Closest, deepest, most involved, and most intimate relationship” given to a similar group of students, the closeness achieved by this experiment overshot that which was reported in the survey by about a third of the students.
If closeness isn’t an explicit task, introverts don’t get as close as extraverts.
If the partners were explicitly told that their task is to become close to each other, both extroverts and introverts will report on a similar level of achieved closeness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rise and Fall of Working From Home”

Last year, Richard Laermer decided to let his employees work from home on a regular basis.
Flexible work remains popular at many organizations, but most companies want workers at work at least some-if not most-of the time.
Telecommuting comes in many flavors, and 77 percent of organizations don’t let people work from home on a full-time basis.
Most employers allow ad-hoc remote work for the person who needs to stay home for the plumber or wait for a package.
Technology such as chat programs and collaboration software made remote work feasible for many white collar workers in the last couple of decades.
Some organizations found the most lenient work-from-home policies kept workers too isolated for that kind of work.
Earlier this year the tech giant told 2,000 U.S. workers they could no longer work from home and about the same number of employees that they had to commute into offices more often.
“IBM’s strategy is about adopting the best work method for the work being done,” said an IBM spokesperson.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Trader So Secret They’re Only Known by a Number Just Made Over $200 Million in One Month”

An unknown cryptocurrency trader turned $55 million of paper wealth into $283 million in just over a month.
The value of ether, for example, rose from about $8 a unit at the start of the year to crest at $400 in June before settling around $250 today.
Ether, the second-most-popular cryptocurrency after bitcoin, is used to pay for applications or programs that run on the Ethereum blockchain, a secured list of transactions that can be shared.
The current value of all the ether held, $23 billion, means dozens of electronic wallets have accrued nine-figure positions.
That’s a stake worth at least $90 million, given a net worth calculated at $925 million, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.
Lubin, the former chief operating officer for Ethereum Switzerland GmbH, which developed the software, could hold hundreds of millions of dollars worth of ether, several investors said.
Erin said in a Reddit post last month his ether holdings equal what would amount to about $117 million today, according to calculations by Bloomberg.
Like bitcoin, ether is struggling to overcome a reputation sullied by cyberattacks and technology bottlenecks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Before you can be with others, first learn to be alone”

Like many poets and philosophers through the ages, Poe stressed the significance of solitude.
Two decades later, the idea of solitude captured Ralph Waldo Emerson’s imagination in a slightly different way: quoting Pythagoras, he wrote: ‘In the morning, – solitude; that nature may speak to the imagination, as she does never in company.
In the 20th century, the idea of solitude formed the centre of Hannah Arendt’s thought.
What Eichmann showed Arendt was that society could function freely and democratically only if it were made up of individuals engaged in the thinking activity – an activity that required solitude.
We might ask, we become lonely in our solitude? Isn’t there some danger that we will become isolated individuals, cut off from the pleasures of friendship? Philosophers have long made a careful, and important, distinction between solitude and loneliness.
Echoing Plato, Arendt observed: ‘Thinking, existentially speaking, is a solitary but not a lonely business; solitude is that human situation in which I keep myself company.
In solitude, Arendt never longed for companionship or craved camaraderie because she was never truly alone.
Arendt reminds us, if we lose our capacity for solitude, our ability to be alone with ourselves, then we lose our very ability to think.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cursed by the body that was his blessing, Greg Oden is headed back to Ohio State”

ODEN IS IN the lobby of the academic support center on the Ohio State campus on a late-May morning, registering for classes to finish the degree he started a decade ago.
Oden called his coach, Thad Matta, and said, “I can’t get to class.” A few weeks later, Oden announced that he would leave for the draft, one of many decisions in his life that wasn’t really his to make.
“Coach!” Oden hollers, dropping the bar and easing himself to the ground until he lies flat on his back.
Oden can’t prove that the orthotic is the sole reason his body collapsed in the NBA. The wheels were in motion for his body to fall apart the moment he hit his first growth spurt on the way to 7 feet.
Oden always had tried to reckon with what his body was and could be, its power and potential.
Former Ohio State assistant Alan Major remembers a jump shot Oden made against Georgetown in the Final Four because it was the Buckeyes’ 38th game and Oden had taken just a handful of jumpers all year.
On Aug. 7, 2014, Oden was supposed to be with the Ohio State basketball team in the Bahamas, volunteering on a summer tour, but he bailed at the last minute.
Oden walks down the stairs of the academic support center, back to the first floor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The $5,000 decision to get rid of my past”

Someone broke into my apartment and stole my video game collection exactly four days later.
The collection included most of the important Dreamcast games.
The tyranny of a collection I was never not collecting video games.
Part of me believed that if I recreated the collection carefully enough, one evening I would wake up and she would be there, playing games in front of the TV in one of my shirts.
If I owned enough of those same games, I could create a portal back to the past and never have to move forward.
You carry your past with you The replacement collection, about 450 games deep when I stopped looking for the classics, was carried from house to house as I grew older.
One day, short on money to buy a certain Nintendo Switch game, I took down a few Super Nintendo games hoping to trade them in.
If GameStop gives you $1 for a game, that means it’s worth at least $5. I began to price out that long-dormant collection.

The orginal article.

Summary of “New Managers Should Focus on Helping Their Teams, Not Pleasing Their Bosses”

When I first became a manager – an unexpected promotion soon after taking a new job – I found myself feeling awkward about the fact that I had been elevated above my peers.
The irony for most newly appointed managers is that the skills and qualities that earned them the promotion are very different from those that will serve them well as a leader, and they’re often left to figure it out on their own, like I was – and not always successfully.
You can’t help but wonder how many of the managers at rapidly growing companies, such as Uber, had any management experience and training before they assumed positions of power.
Harvard Business School professor Francis Frei, who was recently recruited by Uber to help with the company’s leadership and sexual harassment scandals, points out that the instant conclusion might be that the transportation company has bad managers.
She told Marketplace, those managers haven’t been given the guidance they need.
“It turns out we have not been giving leadership training to our managers,” she observed.”So the managers haven’t been set up for success.
When I finally focused on being a real leader, instead of a nervous new manager, I started asking my colleagues how we could best get the work done rather than simply figuring it out by myself.
“You’ll probably be feeling pretty overwhelmed as a new manager,” Hill says.”You’ll need to make sure you take care of yourself emotionally too, so you can be available for other people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power of Pettiness”

Curiosity is the emotion that motivates exploration for new information, as hunger motivates eating.
Curiosity is seen as a cute and cuddly emotion, pleasant and smelling of old books.
Ignorance is the self-renewing resource that allows curiosity to find expression.
How do we shine a light on our own hidden ignorance – the wellspring of learning? In the second stage of curiosity, hidden ignorance is brought to light through an encounter with weirdness.
In the third stage of curiosity, all kinds of emotions – pleasant and unpleasant – motivate exploration and scrupulosity.
In the early stages of a scene of curiosity, when few people are working in the ignorance mines, the subject matter of the scene is clearly not seen as important by the wider culture; being inappropriately obsessed with the apparently trivial is a filter for working in a true scene.
For curiosity to be realized, pettiness must be suppressed and transformed into energy, gleeful malevolence transformed to honorable ends.
In my model, curiosity is not a specific emotion driving a truth-focused process, but rather the small and fragile truth-focused intersection of four cognitive processes, none of which, on its own, is entirely concerned with truth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon Prime is on pace to become more popular than cable TV”

Within a couple of years, more U.S. households could be subscribers of Amazon Prime than cable or satellite TV, according to recent estimates of Amazon’s popular shipping and entertainment service.
Based on Morningstar’s estimates of the average number of Prime memberships per household, that suggests about 66 million households have Amazon Prime memberships in 2017.
According to these estimates, more U.S. households may have an Amazon Prime subscription than a pay TV subscription in as soon as two years.
How we got there: If the number of Amazon Prime households increases by roughly the same pace it has, on average, for the past four years – almost 12 million per year – the number of Prime households in 2019 would be around 89 million.
Amazon knows that Prime is the core of its retail business: Prime members spend more in a year than non-Prime members do, shop more frequently than others and price-compare less, according to studies.
Correction: A previous version of this post and chart incorrectly displayed estimated Prime memberships as Prime households.
To more accurately estimate Prime households, we divided the number of memberships for the past three years by 1.2 and divided earlier years by 1.1.
We’ve updated the number of estimated U.S. households with Amazon Prime in 2017 to 66 million, instead of our previous figure of 79 million, which reflected memberships.

The orginal article.