Summary of “What is CRISPR-Cas9? The revolutionary gene-editing tech explained”

In-between these chunks of useful DNA there are slightly less useful chunks of repetitive DNA keeping them separate – like a kind of molecular bookend.
These repeating segments of DNA are what gives CRISPR its name – Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat – but it’s really the bits between these repeats that make CRISPR so useful.
The spacer sequence is turned into RNA – a molecule that contains messages from DNA – and hunts down the corresponding piece of viral DNA. Once it finds it, an enzyme attached to the RNA string acts as a pair of biological scissors, cutting the target DNA and rendering the virus harmless.
You might have heard this system referred to as CRISPR-Cas9 as well as just plain CRISPR. In this case, the Cas9 bit refers to the enzyme used to cut the target DNA. “We can programme [Cas9] very easily to target one DNA sequence and to be very specific so it won’t cut anything that’s even similar in sequence,” says White.
The race is on to reinvent it before it’s too late Before we get down to the business of unzipping and chopping up DNA, it’s worth getting to grips with the basics of how DNA is structured.
RNA shares three bases with DNA – G, C and A – but T is alway replaced by U. Similar base-pairing rules apply, so an exposed DNA G base will pair with an RNA C base while a DNA A base will pair with a U. If you have an exposed DNA sequence of GAC, for example, you’ll end up with an RNA sequence of CUG.Scientists use these basic principles to create their own CRISPR molecules which, as we pointed out above, are short stretches of RNA. All you need to do is open up a stretch of interesting-looking DNA – like the bit that contains the mutation that leads to sickle-cell anaemia – and build the complementary RNA sequence, with DNA-chopping enzyme attached.
The Cas9 enzyme starts by unzipping bits of the DNA double helix while the RNA molecule sniffs its way along the exposed base pairs looking for a perfect match.
Once the perfect match is found, Cas9 cuts out the troublesome gene before repairing the remaining bits of DNA. Other enzymes can add in insert genes instead of deleting them, but the basic process of unzipping, recognising and editing remains the same across different CRISPR molecules.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”When in Doubt, Play Insane”: An Interview with Catherine O’Hara”

“Schitt’s Creek,” which was created by O’Hara’s longtime collaborator Eugene Levy and his son, Daniel Levy, both of whom also star in the show, is a modern-day reverse “Beverly Hillbillies”: the Rose family, once the millionaire owners of a successful video-store chain, lose everything when their business manager commits fraud.
It’s a classic city-mouse/country-mouse story, but O’Hara’s Moira, with her vainglorious flair for the dramatic and her peacocking wardrobe, elevates the show to a new level of ecstatic eccentricity.
O’Hara played the wicked stepmother Delia Deetz in Tim Burton’s “Beetlejuice” and then spent the nineties as part of Christopher Guest’s troupe of oddballs, starring in his absurdist, unscripted mockumentaries “Waiting for Guffman,” “Best in Show,” “A Mighty Wind,” and “For Your Consideration.” During our free-wheeling conversation, we discussed Moira Rose, the origins of her collaboration with Levy, and the one idea that Christopher Guest would not let her put on film.
After we all agreed we were going to do the show, I had lunch with Daniel and Eugene Levy, and I knew we were going to talk about what I was going to look like.
The night before we shot that scene in “Best in Show,” where I would fall, and then Gerry Fleck would have to take over handling the dog, we were talking about the logistics, and I asked Chris, I said, “Do you think I could do this?” I walked away from him like that.
How did you think about show business from that standpoint, living in L.A.?
There’s such a freedom in the way Chris works, because you improvise, and you get it on film; then he can use whatever he wants, and cut whatever he wants or throw out whatever he wants, but it’s there.
Eugene said, “You might want to run that by Chris before we shoot.” I go, “Well, he can say no afterwards, he can not use it….” And Eugene said, “No, I think you might want to….”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you can’t be productive without routines and rituals”

6 minute Read. There are few things that impact your daily productivity, career trajectory, and overall well-being as much as your routines.
According to research, up to 40% of our daily actions are powered by habits-the unconscious actions and routines we’ve developed over time.
So how do routines and rituals fit into the modern workday? And how can we develop ones that maximize our ability to do meaningful work?
Not everyone consciously crafts their routines to maximize their time.
Blindly following someone else’s routines won’t make you as productive as them.
While routines keep us grounded, they don’t always do much to help us get through the day.
Routines power your day, but rituals help you get through them.
While routines help us feel in control of our time, rituals make sure we stick to our plans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Resilience Is About Recharging, Not Endurance”

We race to get all our ground work done: packing, going through TSA, doing a last-minute work call, calling each other, then boarding the plane.
Lack of recovery – whether by disrupting sleep with thoughts of work or having continuous cognitive arousal by watching our phones – is costing our companies $62 billion a year in lost productivity.
We “Stop” work sometimes at 5PM, but then we spend the night wrestling with solutions to work problems, talking about our work over dinner, and falling asleep thinking about how much work we’ll do tomorrow.
The scientists cite a definition of “Workaholism” as “Being overly concerned about work, driven by an uncontrollable work motivation, and investing so much time and effort to work that it impairs other important life areas.”
In her excellent book, The Sleep Revolution, Arianna Huffington wrote, “We sacrifice sleep in the name of productivity, but ironically our loss of sleep, despite the extra hours we spend at work, adds up to 11 days of lost productivity per year per worker, or about $2,280.”
If you’re trying to build resilience at work, you need adequate internal and external recovery periods.
Try to not have lunch at your desk, but instead spend time outside or with your friends – not talking about work.
We are usually tired already by the time we get on a plane, and the cramped space and spotty internet connection make work more challenging.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Words to Turn a Conversation Around”

Some of these words are surprising, and go against what we’ve been taught to believe.
From conversation analysts such as Stokoe to FBI negotiators and communication coaches, we’re learning which words are likely to placate or persuade us.
One of the first words Stokoe came across that seemed to have a magical effect on people was “Willing”.
Her evidence wasn’t scientific even so, “Just” is one of those words that has a habit of creeping into our emails and spoken conversations.
The word “Talk” seems to make a lot of people resistant to conversation.
“Anything else I can do for you?” Sounds like a perfectly reasonable question, doesn’t it? But John Heritage and Jeffrey Robinson, conversation analysts at the University of California, Los Angeles, looked at how doctors use the words “Any” and “Some” in their final interactions with patients.
A conversation expert, Kendall sits in on other people’s meetings as an observer.
“It’s about how you respond to people who are what we call ‘first movers’ – people who say something really critical, apropos of nothing.” It might be the work colleague who steams up to your desk with a complaint or the neighbour who launches into a rant about parking as you’re putting out the bins.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Plot Against the Principality of Sealand”

At the trial that autumn, the government’s star witness, 25-year-old Carl Winchester, a friend of one of Jannie’s employees, testified that Jannie had pointed a gun at Orell and pulled the trigger several times, but it never fired.
The prosecution claimed that the three defendants finished him off in the car, while Jannie and the others testified that they were talking calmly when the men began arguing and struggling with Orell, and he fell out of the car and died from his injuries.
In his testimony, he said Orell reached for the gun and struck Jannie – “He lunged at her and almost knocked her down” – when she pulled the trigger.
Orell asked Jannie to give him a ride home, and she agreed on the condition that the two other men came along.
At one point, the prosecutor, Assistant U.S. Attorney Frederick Smithson, said of Jannie: “I believe this woman to be that type of individual that they call accident prone.” He defined that as someone who “Make[s] claims against her paramour or husband for the purpose of harassment and to get various pieces of property from him.”
Judge Joseph McGarraghy refused to allow testimony or evidence about Jannie’s IRS history, and the jury apparently accepted the contention – introduced by the police within days of Orell’s death, repeated frequently in newspapers, and advanced by the prosecution – that Jannie was furious at Orell for snitching.
Orell died from a result of Jannie’s acts of self-defense during a series of drunken brawls.
Jannie’s sole remaining close relative, a daughter now in her 60s, at first denied that Jannie was her mother.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You Make Or Break Your Life Between 5-7 AM”

How you spend your morning determines your success in life.
How you spend your morning is the difference between making tens of millions of dollars and making less than 100 grand.
“I frequently say to missionaries in the field, ‘You make or break your mission every morning of your life. You tell me how those morning hours go until you are on the street in your mission, whatever time it is; you tell me how those hours go, and I will tell you how your day will go, I will tell you how your month will go, I will tell you how your year will go and how your mission and your life will go.'” You Make Or Break Your Life Between 5 and 7 AM”Lose an hour in the morning, and you will spend all day looking for it.” - Richard WhatelyIf you lose an hour in your morning, you’ll spend your whole day looking for it.
If you spend your day looking for the most important time you’ve lost, you’ll be spending your whole life on a lower-level path than you could have had.If you don’t prioritize and maximize your morning hours, you’ll always be left wondering what your life could have been.
Without the morning routine, you will be far less equipped to deal with the challenges of life.
I dare you to take on the biggest growth, challenges, and risks of your life without having practices for clarity, creativity, and productivity DAILY.If you’re someone who dislikes or avoids evening and morning routines, then you simply are avoiding the greatest growth of your life.
What Do You Do Between 5 and 7 AM?If you could give yourself two hours, every morning, solely dedicated to learning, thinking, planning, meditating, praying, and writing in your journal, your life would change.
If you read good books every morning, visualize and strategize your goals, and write your insights in your journal, you’ll have an amazing life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Singapore’s ‘kiasu’ culture makes FOMO look like child’s play”

Singapore’s ‘kiasu’ culture makes FOMO look like child’s play – Los Angeles Times.
Long before Americans discovered FOMO – the fear of missing out -Singaporeans were fixated with its more excessive forebear, kiasu.
If you stand in line for hours just because there’s a gift at the end, then you’re kiasu.
If you’re a parent who volunteers hours of your free time at a school just so your offspring has a better chance of enrolling there one day, then you’re most definitely kiasu.
Foreign policy in Singapore isn’t immune to kiasu either.
There are modest signs of a kiasu backlash, including last year when a small group of parents formed “Life Beyond Grades,” an organization that seeks to relieve academic pressure on children to focus on their wider well-being.
A survey released last year by the Institute of Policy Studies, a local think tank, found that Singaporeans perceived their society to be kiasu more than any other trait.
“On one hand, there are Singaporeans who wear it like a mark of national character, even pride. Others laugh at it, and still others see being kiasu as being a bit of an embarrassment due to the over-the-top behavior it can encourage.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Spend Way Less Time on Email Every Day”

Our team at Zarvana – a company that teaches research-backed time management practices – set out to see if there is a data-supported way to reduce the 2.6 daily hours spent on email without sacrificing effectiveness.
What we found surprised even us: we realized we could save more than half of the time we currently spend on email, or one hour and 21 minutes per day.
If people checked their email hourly rather than every 37 minutes, they could cut six email checks from their day.
Between checking email six times more than needed, letting notifications interrupt us, and taking time to get back on track, we lose 21 minutes per day.
Turn off notifications and schedule time every hour to check email.
If people go to their inboxes 15 times per day and spend just four seconds looking at each email and re-reading only 10% of them, they’ll lose 27 minutes each day.
Roughly 10% of the total time people spend on email is spent filing messages they want to keep, a process that involves two phases: deciding where the emails should go and then moving them to the selected folders.
Move every email out of your inbox the first time you read it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Before You Can Be With Others, First Learn to Be Alone”

Like many poets and philosophers through the ages, Poe stressed the significance of solitude.
Two decades later, the idea of solitude captured Ralph Waldo Emerson’s imagination in a slightly different way: quoting Pythagoras, he wrote: ‘In the morning, – solitude; that nature may speak to the imagination, as she does never in company.
In the 20th century, the idea of solitude formed the centre of Hannah Arendt’s thought.
What Eichmann showed Arendt was that society could function freely and democratically only if it were made up of individuals engaged in the thinking activity – an activity that required solitude.
We might ask, we become lonely in our solitude? Isn’t there some danger that we will become isolated individuals, cut off from the pleasures of friendship? Philosophers have long made a careful, and important, distinction between solitude and loneliness.
Echoing Plato, Arendt observed: ‘Thinking, existentially speaking, is a solitary but not a lonely business; solitude is that human situation in which I keep myself company.
In solitude, Arendt never longed for companionship or craved camaraderie because she was never truly alone.
Arendt reminds us, if we lose our capacity for solitude, our ability to be alone with ourselves, then we lose our very ability to think.

The orginal article.