Summary of “Manafort Is Cooperating With Mueller. Now What?”

From 2003 to 2008, Manafort and his firm worked for Deripaska across Europe-in Montenegro, Georgia, and Ukraine.
Deripaska invested millions in a private-equity fund that Manafort established, with the intent of buying assets across the former Soviet Union.
In these documents, Deripaska suggests that Manafort might have stolen his money.
Based on the special counsel’s filings, we also know that Manafort owed Deripaska even more money in the form of unpaid loans.
Manafort finally reached out to Deripaska, just after he joined Donald Trump’s campaign.
In emails obtained by The Atlantic that Paul Manafort traded with an aide, Manafort proposed giving Deripaska special access to the campaign, with the apparent hope of making his debts disappear.
According to Navalny, the video lends credibility to the theory that Deripaska might have been a crucial intermediary between Manafort and the Kremlin.
The Curious Case of Konstantin KilimnikRobert Mueller has periodically suggested that Manafort’s top aide was an active agent of Russian intelligence in 2016.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What is fascism? A Yale philosopher explains how it works”

A new book by Yale philosopher Jason Stanley is the latest attempt to clarify what fascism is and how it functions in the modern world.
I spoke with him recently about what fascism looks like today, why the destruction of truth is so essential to fascist movements, and whether he thinks it’s accurate to call President Donald Trump a fascist, as some have.
Of course, that’s connected to fascist ideology, because fascist ideology centers on power.
People are always asking, “Is such-and-such politician really a fascist?” Which is really just another way of asking if this person has a particular set of beliefs or an ideology, but again, I don’t really think of a fascist as someone who holds a set of beliefs.
My book identifies the various techniques that fascists tend to adopt, and shows how someone can be more fascist or less fascist in their politics.
If you think about fascism as a sliding scale, ordinary conservative politics is going to find itself somewhere on that scale – which is not to say that it’s fascist at all, any more than ordinary Democratic politics is communist.
Sean Illing There’s a great line from the philosopher Hannah Arendt, I think in her book about totalitarianism, where she says that fascists are never content to merely lie; they must transform their lie into a new reality, and they must persuade people to believe in the unreality they’ve created.
Sean Illing In the book, you imply that there’s something inherently fascist about American politics, or at the very least that fascism has always been a latent force in America.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Supreme Court Justices Serve for Life?”

In the modern era, that often means more than three decades on the court-thanks to increased lifespans, justices appointed in the next century are expected to sit on the Supreme Court for an average of 35 years, compared to the average of around 16 years that judges served in the past.
Well, for one thing, the U.S. Constitution doesn’t exactly specify that justices and the court are in a “’til death do us part” relationship.
The only Supreme Court justice Congress has tried to impeach was Samuel Chase, who was appointed by George Washington in 1796.
Chase was an openly partisan Federalist vehemently opposed to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican policies, and he wasn’t afraid to say so, either in his role as a lower court judge or once he was appointed to the Supreme Court.
The lifetime appointment is designed to ensure that the justices are insulated from political pressure and that the court can serve as a truly independent branch of government.
UK Supreme Court justices face mandatory retirement at age 70, as do judges on Australia’s High Court.
Canadian Supreme Court justices have a mandatory retirement age of 75, while the 31 justices of India’s Supreme Court must retire by the age of 65.
One popular suggestion among political analysts and scholars is to impose an 18-year term limit, though critics note that that particular plan does bring up the potential that at some point, a single president could end up appointing the majority of the justices on the court.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Puberty Kills Girls’ Confidence”

A lack of confidence isn’t what’s holding back working women.
The female tween and early-teen confidence plunge is especially striking because multiple measures suggest that girls in middle and high school are, generally speaking, outperforming boys academically, and many people mistake their success for confidence.
The girls we talked with and polled detailed, instead, a worrisome shift.
From girls 12 and under, we heard things such as “I make friends really easily-I can go up to anyone and start a conversation” and “I love writing poetry and I don’t care if anyone else thinks it’s good or bad.” A year or more into their teens, it was “I feel like everybody is so smart and pretty and I’m just this ugly girl without friends,” and “I feel that if I acted like my true self that no one would like me.”
Confidence is an essential ingredient for turning thoughts into action, wishes into reality.
So the cratering of confidence in girls is especially troubling because of long-term implications.
Indeed the confidence gender gap that opens at puberty often remains throughout adulthood.
The boys in our survey seemed to have a greater appetite for risk-taking: Our poll shows that, between ages 8 and 14, boys are more likely than girls to describe themselves as confident, strong, adventurous, and fearless.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sam Mendes’s Directorial Discoveries”

The British director Sam Mendes doesn’t like to act, but he frequently finds himself in front of an audience, taking a bow.
On the first day of shooting his début film, “American Beauty,” for DreamWorks, in 1998, when he was thirty-three, Mendes was so callow that he had to ask his cinematographer, Conrad Hall, when to say “Action”: “I’m thinking, Oh, my God, that’s amazing! I’m in Los Angeles, California, and I actually said, ‘Action!'” Mendes told the Guardian in 2008.
“I can’t exist alone. I can’t achieve anything while I’m alone.” Much to his union’s chagrin, Mendes refuses to benefit from the hard-fought battle for “Possessory credit”-you won’t find “A film by Sam Mendes” in the credits for any of his movies.
“My directorial style was inextricably linked to the building,” Mendes said.
Ethan Hawke, who appeared in “The Cherry Orchard” and “The Winter’s Tale” under Mendes’s direction, said, “He thinks like an athlete. Sam knows how to move the ball. When the ball is moving well, good things happen.” When Mendes started rehearsals for “The Ferryman,” a play with twenty-one characters inhabiting a large kitchen in a Northern Ireland farmhouse, he trusted the emotional life of the play but didn’t know whether its physical life would work.
“Every Sam Mendes production has the magic of a secret,” Ethan Hawke said.
“I should have stepped aside,” Mendes said, recalling his contentious relationship with “Gypsy” ‘s “Scary” book writer, Arthur Laurents, and “The poisonous hatred that exuded off this tiny homunculus.” In the case of “The Vertical Hour,” Mendes couldn’t coax a credible performance out of Julianne Moore, who was making her Broadway début, as an Ivy League professor and TV pundit in favor of the Iraq War.
Who has three brothers and considers Mendes his fourth, is a sort of Mendes Maxi-Me: the same salt-and-pepper beard, the same swarthy skin, the same tonsorial style, but not the same metabolism.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tiger Woods didn’t win the 2018 BMW Championship. He’ll win something soon, I think.”

Pray no one ever looks at you the way Tiger Woods looks at a golf ball that’s come to rest unfavorably in a crater of a fairway divot.
PGA TOUR September 7, 2018 That was the bad break Woods caught off the tee during Friday’s second round, on the same 16th hole he’d eagled the day before.
“The Scotty,” which Woods has kept in his bag most of the time since 1999 and wielded in 13 of his 14 major championship victories, is a holy item to golf-equipment nerds.
Who knows if Tiger Woods really is a kind person now-he plays the role of kind person well.
Ticket sales spike when Woods commits to a tournament, and Saturday’s crowds at the BMW were an overwhelming audiovisual presentation of what the Tiger effect feels like in person.
One guy couldn’t have been 20 feet from Woods when he shouted, “Let’s put 2-oh-9 behind us, baby.” Within seconds after hearing that reference to his sex scandal, which broke the record, previously held by 9/11, for most consecutive New York Post covers, Woods hit his drive on the 16th hole right down the middle.
Tiger has played alongside some PGA Tour rookies this year, guys who were so excited that they asked Woods to pose for post-round photos with their families and friends.
So how does Tiger Woods deal with the pandemonium of playing in Tiger Woods’ pairing every round? Experience probably explains most of it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Researchers Discover a Pattern to the Seemingly Random Distribution of Prime Numbers”

Often known as “The building blocks of mathematics,” prime numbers have fascinated mathematicians for centuries due to their highly unpredictable and seemingly random nature.
Prime numbers are integers that can only be divided by themselves or the number 1, and they appear along the number line in a highly erratic way.
The further along the number line you go, the more random the distribution of primes appears to be.
Some of the most important types of modern cryptography are based upon the extreme unpredictability of very large prime numbers.
The widely used RSA encryption algorithm relies on the fact that it’s easy to take two very large prime numbers and multiply them, but extremely difficult to take a very large number and figure out which primes were multiplied together to make that large number.
Last year, theoretical chemist and Princeton professor Salvatore Torquato had a hunch-what if prime numbers were modelled as atom-like particles? Would they create a pattern too?
Known as “Hyperuniformity”, this is a rare property that only a few materials and systems in nature demonstrate, such as the arrangement of color-detecting cone cells in bird’s eyes, certain emulsions and quasi-crystals, the large-scale structure of the universe, and as it turns out, prime numbers.
The paper claims to have produced an algorithm that “Enables one to predict primes with high accuracy.” While the usefulness of such a tool is not yet known, it marks another step towards conclusively solving the enigma of prime numbers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Good Man, and Thorough: The Genius of ‘The Big Lebowski'”

In the published screenplay for The Big Lebowski, a character named “The Dude” is introduced in the stage directions as “a man in whom casualness runs deep.” Of all the Coens’ movies, The Big Lebowski is, at least on the surface, the most ambling and aimless.
The Big Lebowski was released in 1998, after the success of Fargo had rerouted the Coens’ career.
The claim made by The Stranger that Jeffrey Lebowski is “Possibly the laziest man in Los Angeles County … which would place him high in the running for laziest worldwide” is backed up by Bridges’s soporific comportment, which suggests a character hypnotized by his own passivity-a waking trance state that leads him to subconsciously absorb information from the world around him.
After being roughed up at his squalid pit of an apartment by thugs who’ve mistaken him for a different, considerably more prosperous man with the same name-who pee on his rug to make the humiliation complete-The Dude goes to the other Jeffrey Lebowski for compensation and, after being rebuffed, tells him that “This aggression will not stand.” In lieu of any strongly held beliefs, The Dude is wide open to suggestion, and hearing saber-rattling Republican platitudes being parroted by an aged hippie is the pivot point of The Big Lebowski’s 360-degree sociological satire.
Then there’s the Big Lebowski himself, acted by the late David Huddleston as a physical and ideological double for Dick Cheney, who proudly displays photos of himself with a host of Republican power brokers.
By rejecting The Dude’s request for a new rug to replace the soiled one, the Big Lebowski claims to be standing for conservative notions of self-reliance.
It’s a ridiculous oversimplification to call The Big Lebowski a movie about a man who wants to replace his rug.
The Big Lebowski is a film dominated by circular, reiterative dialogue, and The Dude isn’t the only one who absorbs and parrots key phrases from the people around him.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Improve Homework Time With These Concentration Hacks for Kids”

While the kids do their homework, do your own work of the non-digital variety-sorting through mail, signing papers, writing thank you notes, journaling, drafting that novel in your head or making your to-do list for the next day.
For longer stretches of study time, you might give your kid two or three “Complaining minute” tickets that they can use as needed.
While it’s nice to have a dedicated space for homework, your kids may absorb more material if they move around the house while studying.
Explains study coach Ana Mascara: “Let’s say you study for math in the kitchen, and then you study for math in the library, and then you study for math on the bus, the brain is going to be like, ‘Huh. She’s using these math formulas in a lot of different environments. Maybe these math formulas are crucial to Ana’s survival. Let us solidify these math formulas because hey, she’s using them everywhere, so they must be important, right?'” I know that when I write, being able to meander around the house helps me gain clarity-I often find new perspectives in new environments.
A study found that while performing a repetitive task, four- and six-year-olds who pretended to be a familiar character such as Batman persevered significantly longer than those who remained themselves.
Here’s a good one for kids who are little too old for the Batman thing.
Study after study links exercise with academic improvement.
Schedule a play break between the last school bell and homework time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Reimagining of Schrödinger’s cat breaks quantum mechanics”

Quantum theory has a long history of thought experiments, and in most cases these are used to point to weaknesses in various interpretations of quantum mechanics.
The latest version, which involves multiple players, is unusual: it shows that if the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics is correct, then different experimenters can reach opposite conclusions about what the physicist in the box has measured.
Quantum mechanics underlies nearly all of modern physics, explaining everything from the structure of atoms to why magnets stick to each other.
If quantum mechanics applies to the physicist, then she should be in an uncertain state that combines both outcomes until Wigner opens the box.
One of the two friends can toss a coin and – using her knowledge of quantum physics – prepare a quantum message to send to the other friend.
The experiment cannot be put into practice, because it would require the Wigners to measure all quantum properties of their friends, which includes reading their minds, points out theorist Lídia Del Rio, a colleague of Renner’s at ETH Zurich.
It might be feasible to make two quantum computers play the parts of Alice and Bob: the logic of the argument requires only that they know the rules of physics and make decisions based on them, and in principle one can detect the complete quantum state of a quantum computer.
Some interpretations of quantum mechanics already allow for views of reality that depend on perspective.

The orginal article.