Summary of “A Brief History of Romantic Love and Why It Kind of Sucks”

Fifth Fact: The ancient Greek philosopher Plato argued that the highest form of love was actually this non-sexual, non-romantic form of attachment to another person, this so-called “Brotherly love.” Plato reasoned that since passion and romance and sex often make us do ridiculous things that we regret, this sort of passionless love between two family members or between two close friends was the height of virtuous human experience.
Plato, like most people in the ancient world, looked upon romantic love with skepticism, if not absolute horror.
Seventh Fact: For most of human history, romantic love was looked upon as a kind of sickness.
If you think about it, it’s not hard to figure out why: romantic love causes people to do some stupid shit.
They were warnings against the potential negative consequences of love, of how romantic love can potentially ruin everything.
The new ideal was not only to marry for love but that that love was to live on in bliss for all of the eternity.
People are just now starting to figure out that while love is great, that by itself, love is not enough.
The great liberation of romantic love has brought incredible life experiences into the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can Rotten Tomatoes Crush a Movie at the Box Office?”

The headline was spurred by The Emoji Movie, a poorly reviewed movie featuring animated phone icons, which had a successful box-office performance in spite of those poor reviews.
Rotten Tomatoes neither saved Detroit, nor did it torpedo The Emoji Movie.
“For a picture that doesn’t have a brand name and doesn’t have movie stars,” producer Donna Gigliotti told the Times, “Rotten Tomatoes scores can enhance the box office.
In its growth, Rotten Tomatoes has come to represent a faceless avatar of criticism to the American public, if not the intellectual act of dissecting a movie.
” “I don’t like to see everything, but honestly it gets to the point where, if a movie has such a low score on Rotten Tomatoes, I’ll see it for fun,” says Ryan, 23.
I don’t think it was a good movie, but I think when you see a percentage, you think of that as how good the movie is or something.
Rotten Tomatoes describes the list’s purpose like this: “Movies with 40 or more critic reviews vie for their place in history at Rotten Tomatoes.
Rotten Tomatoes doesn’t care about that, per se, and neither do the studios, so long as you see their movies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Maddeningly Simple Way Tech Companies Can Employ More Women”

He tells us he’ll have a booth at the Grace Hopper conference, the largest annual gathering of women in tech.
Will women have any input in the hiring process? Will the interview panels be diverse? Will current female employees be available to speak to candidates about their experiences? Many times, the answer to each of these questions is no, and the resistance to make simple changes in these areas is striking.
I remind them that when it comes to gender, they have to play catch-up, after long histories of eroding trust by grilling women about how they’ll be able to do the job with children at home and years of negative stories in the press with tales of how women are mistreated at tech companies.
Silicon Valley companies are in love with themselves and don’t understand why the love isn’t always returned by the few women to whom they extend employment offers.
That’s why they’re so proud of so-called boomerangs – candidates who have left a company for reasons that may or may not be related to how it treats women and, after advancing their careers elsewhere, return.
They want to know, what policies have changed for us? Is the environment more inclusive? Can I have a family without compromising my career? When tech firms in Silicon Valley and beyond decide to proactively answer those questions as part of their regular processes, they have a chance to successfully recruit and hire more women.
The company realized it needed to take extra time to convince women that it truly valued them.
The women hired through that effort are all still at the company.

The orginal article.

Summary of “She Just Won 3 Gold Medals for Her Swimming. She’s Only 73.”

Donald Cheek, known as Doc, a resident of Clovis, Calif., is an international gold medal Masters sprinter at 87.
Mr. Cheek repeatedly wins in the 85-to-89 division, competing in the 50-, 100-, 200- and 400-meter events.
For Mr. Cheek, the nation’s fastest 100-meter sprinter in his age group, there is “a pride and a mental discipline that carries over into your whole lifestyle,” he said.
Consistent exercise, said Mr. Cheek, who is a part-time professor of social psychology at California State University, Fresno, allows you to have “a body that can perform for you any time you want.”
Mr. Cheek, who grew up in Harlem and earned a Ph.D. from Temple University, has been running track since his days at Cardinal Hayes High School in the Bronx.
Mr. Cheek, for example, starts his routine with a variety of relaxed stretches.
Mr. Cheek is also shown skipping with his grandchildren; he recommends two minutes of skipping.
Then Mr. Cheek moves on to high-step skipping, with the emphasis on lifting his knees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Driscoll’s Reinvented the Strawberry”

Driscoll’s sells more than a billion clamshells every year; it was Driscoll’s idea to put berries into clamshells in the first place.
The story of Driscoll’s long dominion begins with what might be perceived as an original sin: in the midst of the Second World War, the group of growers that eventually became Driscoll’s got hold of the university’s germplasm, hired its chief breeders, and created a strawberry leviathan.
The Driscolls and the Reiters had enjoyed the advantages of controlling a breed after a twenty-year run, Banner fell victim to “The yellows,” a viral infection spread by strawberry aphids.
Family lore has it that in 1944 Ned Driscoll and some grower friends pooled their gas rations and drove to the university plots to rescue the life’s work of Thomas and Goldsmith: untold thousands of strawberry seedlings, representing precious university germplasm.
In an account provided by Driscoll’s, Thomas writes that nevertheless Goldsmith “Did recognize it as having a fruit character of excellent quality.” He and Goldsmith kept at it, testing and adjusting the growing regimen until they had “Perhaps the finest commercial strawberry ever developed.” In 1958, they released it as Z5A, Driscoll’s first proprietary cultivar, a blockbuster berry that would prove momentous for the company.
The strapping, broad-shouldered modern strawberry that Driscoll’s exemplifies is the product of a cross between a Virginian male and a Chilean female that took place in France in the eighteenth century.
“Would that be good, if we planted a variety that had a cinnamon kind of flavor?” Schwieterman went on, “What about reconstructing a basil flavor in a strawberry? This species has one component that’s pretty important to basil, and one of our commercial species has another. What would happen if we introgressed that and got multiple compounds in a strawberry? You’d have a strawberry that’s going to taste great with your salad and balsamic dressing, because it has a nice basil undertone.” Driscoll’s hopes that its breeders can use this information to create new cultivars, producing strawberries as you would a track, dialling down the greasy peach and laying in some cinnamon and must, over a bass line of drought tolerance.
Baum, the retired strawberry executive, said, “If you make any kind of deal letting Shaw and that group have those materials, you are going to be doing the same thing that happened with the university and Driscoll’s, giving them the same kind of a hold that Driscoll’s had for fifty years. They could easily eclipse Driscoll’s.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Glossier Hacked Social Media to Build A Cult-Like Following”

On a Thursday afternoon in late spring, 32-year-old Glossier founder and CEO Emily Weiss rides the elevator to the penthouse level of her company’s downtown Manhattan headquarters.
Weiss graduated in 2007 with a degree in studio art, then kept rising in media.
Green helped Weiss raise $2 million in seed funding, which she used to assemble a small team, including creative director Helen Steed, a beauty industry vet who’d helped build Bumble & Bumble, and COO Henry Davis, who came from the London office of venture capital firm Index Ventures.
“We were Uber-rushing our first-day deliveries to customers in New York using, like, 30 burner phones. Everyone was doing something that was not their job.” Weiss did a few deliveries herself, which Glossier filmed and put on Instagram.
Weiss used the money to invest in technology and data analytics that would study Instagram and other social platforms, measuring not just how well certain Glossier posts performed but how well each product performed: Were people sharing them as product shots, or selfies, or not at all? Which user-generated posts sparked the most engagement, and how much more engaged could they be?
Earlier this year, for example, it launched a program in which more than 420 of its most active and influential community members sell products to their friends and followers; in turn, they receive a cut of the profits, as well as rewards that include sneak previews of products and trips to New York to visit Glossier and have dinner with Weiss.
Weiss did make one big error in how she built her community, though.
To market it, Weiss hired 10 makeup artists to use the blush on celebrity clients attending the Oscars and post the results on social media.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The White Lies of Craft Culture”

The founders, so many former lawyers or bankers or advertising execs, tend to be white, the front-facing staff in their custom denim aprons tend to be white, the clientele sipping $10 beers tends to be white.
Craft culture tells mostly white stories for mostly white consumers, and they nearly always sound the same: It begins somewhere remote-sounding like the mountains of Cottonwood, Idaho, or someplace quirky like a basement in Fort Collins, Colorado, or a loft in Brooklyn, where a artisan, who has a vision of back in the day, when the food was real and the labor that produced it neither alienated nor obscured – and discovers a long-forgotten technique, plucked from an ur-knowledge as old as thought and a truth as pure as the soul.
The character of craft culture, a special blend of bohemianism and capitalism, is not merely overwhelmingly white – a function of who generally has the wealth to start those microbreweries and old-school butcher shops, and to patronize them – it consistently engages in the erasure or exploitation of people of color whose intellectual and manual labor are often the foundation of the practices that transform so many of these small pleasures into something artful.
The enormous power of craft culture to omit and obscure is in some ways rendered most clearly by the case of barbecue: Even though its roots in pit-style cooking on plantations are well known, its transmutation from a staple to a product of true craft is a feat largely attributed to the exceptional taste and unique skill of the white pitmasters who have claimed it as their own.
Within craft culture, coffee seems like an exception to narratives of white authorship.
A white-savior narrative is also neatly embedded within the typical story of how craft coffee gets from the farm to the consumer: The pristine crop lies deep in a primitive land, waiting to be discovered by oracle-like coffee buyers; the benevolent coffee company shows the farmer how to grow his own crop to meet its high standards; finally, the beans’ essential flavors are unlocked with masterful roasting on vintage equipment and the skillful techniques of tattooed baristas.
Beyond the farms, like most other realms of craft culture, there are few visible people of color in coffee.
Michelle Johnson, known as the Chocolate Barista, writes in a blog post, “I can comfortably claim that specialty coffee is a white man’s world. All of my bosses have been white men; at competition, most of the judges and baristas are white men, and so are a majority of my guests when I’m working behind the bar.” As Johnson concludes, “I recognize that for now specialty coffee is mostly a white man’s game, but it doesn’t have to be a racist one.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Help Employees Create Knowledge”

Many leaders see organizational learning simply as sharing existing knowledge.
These systems sought to make existing knowledge more accessible to those who might need it in the form of knowledge repositories that collected and indexed documents as well as directories of expertise that could point employees to others who had relevant know-how.
Without diminishing the value of knowledge sharing, we would suggest that the most valuable form of learning today is actually creating new knowledge.
In a rapidly changing world, much of the new knowledge comes in the form of tacit knowledge – knowledge that resides in our heads but that we have a hard time articulating to ourselves, much less to others.
Scalable learning focuses on creating environments where new tacit knowledge can be created and evolve as workers confront new situations.
In an organization focused on scalable efficiency, the focus of learning is on sharing explicit knowledge.
If leaders shift their focus to creating new tacit knowledge, then that kind of learning is best done in small workgroups that bring together people with diverse skills and perspectives and that help them to form deep, trust-based relationships with each other so that they can feel comfortable trying new things, even if they might not work, and reflecting collaboratively on what worked and what didn’t work.
Scalable learning shifts the focus to learning in the work environment as new performance challenges arise.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Seven Best and Worst Fighters on ‘Game of Thrones'”

Via titles, costumes, and scripts, Game of Thrones tells us who its most fearsome fighters are supposed to be.
One such pair of practiced eyes belongs to my soon-to-be-brother-in-law, Alec Barbour, a fight director and an advanced actor/combatant with the Society of American Fight Directors-that is, the type of person who would work on a show like Thrones and ensure that the fight scenes are both entertaining and moderately realistic.
With that variable combat quality in mind, I asked Alec to rank the best and worst warriors on Game of Thrones, in terms of how effective and realistic their fighting technique appears from a fight director’s perspective.
Seven is a special number in Westeros, so with apologies to Pod, Bronn, Sers Loras and Barristan, and other “Middle-of-the-road” warriors who didn’t make the cut, we present the best seven and worst seven fighters on Game of Thrones, accompanied by Alec’s comments and critiques.
Second, Syrio’s on-screen fighting style-the look of which was crafted by legendary British sword-master William Hobbes, who choreographed amazing fights for Rob Roy, The Duellists, and The Three Musketeers, among other films-was our first introduction to water dancing, and I far prefer his style, which is solidly grounded in historical rapier fencing, to the altogether-too-showy juggling style we were introduced to by Jorah’s Season 5 opponent in the fighting pits of Meereen.
Brienne of Tarth Fight Director’s Verdict: If there’s a “Most Improved Fighter” award in Westeros, it should go to Brienne.
Ultimately, one of the most celebrated fighters in Westeros ends up looking like a rank amateur, although admittedly, being imprisoned and poorly fed for a year didn’t set him up for success.
The Unsullied Fight Director’s Verdict: For my money, the most overrated fighters in Westeros are the Unsullied, Game of Thrones’ answer to elite shield and spear regiments like the Spartans from 300 or the Myrmidons from Troy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Watch the Eclipse Online if You’re Stuck Indoors”

Then the clouds roll in, or you’re stuck indoors at work without windows.
There are plenty of places you can stream the eclipse online if you’re in no position to see it with your own eyes – and you might even get a better view.
The first thing you’ll need to know is when you should pay attention to the events happening in the sky.
This chart from NASA runs down when the eclipse begins and ends, along with when totality begins and ends, for each time zone in the United States.
This way you’ll know exactly when to pop outdoors or go up to the roof to catch the event.
If you’re on the West Coast of the United States, you might want to grab your eclipse glasses or goggles and head outside just after 9 a.m. Pacific, but definitely make sure you don’t miss totality around 10:19 a.m. if you live far enough north to see it.
Those of us on the East Coast should make sure to head outside just after 1 p.m. Eastern and pay close attention around 2:30 p.m. If you’re still unsure what you’ll be able to see and when, check out NASA’s interactive map here.

The orginal article.