Summary of “The 8 biggest announcements from Apple WWDC 2017”

Apple’s WWDC 2017 keynote just wrapped, where key executives Craig Federighi, Phil Schiller, and, of course, Tim Cook, took the stage to announce updates headed to iPhones, MacBooks, Apple TV, and more.
So let’s get the Siri speaker rumors out of the way: it turns out Apple wasn’t quite aiming its smart speaker to go against just Amazon Echo and Google Home, but also the Sonos home entertainment speakers.
Apple priced the HomePod at $349, with plans to ship it in December first to customers in the US, UK, and Australia.
During the keynote, Apple demoed this by showing off a VR game featuring Darth Vader, a lightsaber, and TIE fighter.
Handwritten text from an Apple Pencil will also be searchable from the Notes app.
Just as Lauren Goode predicted, Apple introduced a new ARKit to let developers build augmented reality apps for the iPhone.
There’s a new feature called ProMotion which reduces the Apple Pencil’s latency to 20 milliseconds.
An update for the Apple Watch is coming which introduces new faces that display different types of informations, such as Siri reminders or more visual ones that feature Toy Story characters a la Mickey Mouse.

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Summary of “A psychologist explains why we’re probably all delusional and how to fix it”

Almost nobody is self-aware, says psychologist Tasha Eurich in her new book Insight.
Not to say they were being intentionally misleading, but there is work showing that if people have rose-colored glasses, they might feel good in some sense, but they also tend to be less happy, less successful and, equally importantly, the people around them tend to view them pretty negatively, which has bad effects.
When we’re delusional about ourselves, we frustrate and alienate the people around us too.
If someone thinks they’re good at something when they’re not, we say they’re “Not self-aware.” But if they’re deluded in the other direction and think they’re worse than they are, we don’t say they’re “Not self-aware,” we say they’re “Insecure.” Why the difference? Are the insecure people also not self-aware?
It kind of does make sense because part of truly being self-aware is understanding how you come across to other people and the impact you have on them.
One thing you emphasize is that the people who introspect the most aren’t any more self-aware than others.
Some people are really scared of not being self-aware and analyze all these things to try to get there.
So one of the biggest mistakes people make, especially self-conscious and self-critical people, is believing that type of thinking is good for them or beneficial in some way.
The people who are the most self-aware don’t force themselves into those simple kind of absolute truths.
One of the really self-aware people explained it by saying that the process of self-exploration is like exploring space: there’s so much we don’t know, and that’s what makes it so exciting.

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Summary of “Death of the smartphone and what comes after”

One day, not too soon – but still sooner than you think – the smartphone will all but vanish, the way beepers and fax machines did before it.
Make no mistake: We’re still probably at least a decade away from any kind of meaningful shift away from the smartphone.
Piece by piece, the groundwork for the eventual demise of the smartphone is being laid by Elon Musk, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, and a countless number of startups that still have a part to play.
Let me tell you: If and when the smartphone does die, that’s when things are going to get really weird for everybody.
Here’s a brief look at the slow, ceaseless march toward the death of the smartphone – and what the post-smartphone world is shaping up to look like.
Consider the smartphone from another perspective.
The smartphone just took that model, shrank it, and made the input virtual and touch-based.
Microsoft’s Alex Kipman recently told Business Insider that augmented reality could flat-out replace the smartphone, the TV, and anything else with a screen.
If smartphones gave us access to information and augmented reality puts that information in front of us when we need it, then putting neural lace in our brains just closes the gap.
So if and when the smartphone dies, it’ll actually be the end of an era in more ways than one.

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Summary of “What’s the Problem with Men?”

Men are 10 times more likely to commit murder and nine times more likely than women to end up in prison.
Why us? Why men? Is it in our biology? Did we evolve this way? Are we inherently more aggressive? Is it part of our innate male psychology? Are there unhealthy social pressures causing us to act in such inappropriate ways? Are men just fucking evil? Bueller? Bueller?
Men commit suicide at a rate five times that of women while teenage boys commit suicide nine times more often than girls.
One survey found that 40% of the victims of domestic violence are men, yet they were far less likely to report the violence and far less likely to be taken seriously by police.
15 Men take on more dangerous jobs and are less likely to report any injury suffered at work.
In short, most men treat themselves as nothing more than a walking paycheck.
Men are so emotionally incompetent without women, getting married is literally the healthiest thing a man can do in his life.
Marriage is apparently so important for men’s emotional stability that some sociologists go as far as to state that simply being married can raise a man’s life expectancy by almost a decade.
The problem with the traditional masculine formula – protection, providing, procreating – is that they require men to measure their self-worth via some external, arbitrary metric.
It’s like, “Dude, what more do you need?” And the answer with men like Escobar is: more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Most productive people: 6 things they do every day”

Research shows how you start the day has an enormous effect on productivity and you procrastinate more when you’re in a bad mood.
Studies demonstrate happiness increases productivity and makes you more successful.
Doctors put in a positive mood before making a diagnosis show almost three times more intelligence and creativity than doctors in a neutral state, and they make accurate diagnoses 19 percent faster.
So think a little less about managing the work and a little more about managing your moods.
I’ve interviewed a number of very productive people and nobody said, “Spend more time with email.”
Want to be more productive? Don’t ask how to make something more efficient until after you’ve asked “Do I need to do this at all?”.
Preliminary analysis from CEOs in India found that a firm’s sales increased as the CEO worked more hours.
No. What you do have is more tantalizing, easily accessible, shiny things available to you 24/7 than any human being has ever had. The answer is to lock yourself somewhere to make all the flashing, buzzing distractions go away.
Helping others takes time but research shows it makes us feel like we have more time.
Once you are more productive, you’ll have a lot more hours to fill.

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Summary of “10 simple ways to focus when you don’t feel like working – A Life of Productivity”

Takeaway: 10 ways to get your productivity back on track: set intentions for the day; work slower; disconnect while you do your most important work; download a distractions blocker; consider consuming more caffeine; carve out time to deliberately daydream; take more breaks; work shorter days; work around how much energy you have; and develop a skill or two if you’re going through a less demanding period at work.
Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 42s. Today is the first day back after the long weekend-if you find your productivity and energy levels waning, as I usually do after stepping back from my work for a little bit, this post is for you.
At times like this, here are 10 strategies I use to re-engage with my work!
Before you begin working, define a few things you want to accomplish by the time the day and week are over.
These intentions can be simple or complicated, large or small-the key is to step back from your work and ask what’s important, both today and over the next seven days.
Working slower calms you and allows you to work more deliberately and purposefully.
This week, try working slower and on fewer things at once if you find yourself struggling to become re-immersed in your work.
These apps let you pre-decide which sites you want to block yourself from accessing so you can focus more deeply on your work.
Curiously, the more diffused our attention, the more creative we become because we’re able to connect more disparate ideas in our head. Try spending a bit more time daydreaming this week-like by going for a walk without your phone, or working out without listening to anything.
It’s a lot more difficult to focus on your work when half of your team is on vacation.

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Summary of “If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists?”

The research is clear: when we choose humble, unassuming people as our leaders, the world around us becomes a better place.
Humble leaders improve the performance of a company in the long run because they create more collaborative environments.
A study of 161 teams found that employees following humble leaders were themselves more likely to admit their mistakes and limitations, share the spotlight by deflecting praise to others, and be open to new ideas, advice, and feedback.
German sociologist Max Weber defined charisma as “Of divine origin or as exemplary, and on the basis of it, the individual concerned is treated as a leader.” Research evidence on charismatic leadership reveals that charismatic people are more likely to become endorsed as leaders because of their high energy, unconventional behavior, and heroic deeds.
Although the socialized charismatic leader has the aura of a hero, it is counteracted with low authoritarianism and a genuine interest in the collective welfare.
In contrast, the personalized charismatic leader’s perceived heroism is coupled with high authoritarianism and high narcissism.
The problem is that we select negative charismatic leaders much more frequently than in the limited situations where the risk they represent might pay off.
If humble leaders are more effective than narcissistic leaders, why do we so often choose narcissistic individuals to lead us?
My own research shows that our psychological states can also bias our perceptions of charismatic leaders.
As a result, crises increase not only the search for charismatic leaders, but also our tendency to perceive charisma in the leaders we already follow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Benedict Evan from Andreessen Horowitz predicts the future of electric and autonomous cars, VR and MR, machine learning, retail, e-commerce, and more”

On one hand, we have a set of profound changes coming as a result of new primary technology.
Electric and autonomous cars will change cities, virtual and mixed reality will change the entire computing experience, and machine learning is changing the kind of questions that computers can answer.
How do cities change if some or all of their parking space is now available for new needs, dumped on the market, or moved to completely different places? Where are you willing to live if access to public transport is everywhere and there are no traffic jams on your commute? How willing are people to go from their home in a suburb to dinner or a bar in a city center on a dark, cold, wet night if they don’t have to park and an on-demand ride is the cost of a coffee? And how does law enforcement change when every passing car is watching everything?
Once these really come to market, they may change the world just as much as the iPhone.
Machine learning is happening right now and rolls through, or perhaps underneath, the entire tech industry as a new fundamental computer-science capability-and of course enables both mixed reality and autonomous cars.
At the same time we have a set of more immediate changes, that have much more to do with consumer behavior, company strategy, and economic tipping points than with primary, frontier technology of the kind that Magic Leap or Waymo are building.
Again, this is especially important in the US, which is very over-served by pay TV: Almost everyone has it, and the average spend is much more than people in other developed markets typically pay, so there’s a lot of pent-up desire for change.
This will probably change, and the more that viewing shifts, the more that ad budgets will be reconsidered.
More deeply the more that buying shifts, the more that ad budgets might change.
How much, really, do AVs change shopping or the cost of home delivery? And what happens to your buying choices when machine learning means a pair of glasses can look at your living room and suggest a lamp based on your taste, and then show what it would look like in situ?

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Summary of “How to Fix Your Broken Perception of Time”

What can we do? To fix our broken perception of time, we can reevaluate our relationship with it, become more aware of how we spend our days, and understand how our perception of time influences productivity.
One of the central questions in time perception research is whether our bodies have a single “Main clock”, or if our perception of time is governed by multiple structures in the brain.
As we get older, our organisms change, and so does our perception of time, making us feel like time is passing faster.
In his book “A Geography of Time”, Robert Levine explains how attitudes to time vary across countries and cultures.
Since our productivity is directly related to both, it’s easy to see how a distorted perception of time can negatively affect our performance.
We’ve looked at the causes of our broken perception of time and the consequences it has on our productivity.
Does your productivity spike at certain points during the day? Do you tend to work in large chunks of time? How much time do you waste on social media?
You will also become aware of how you spend your time, and hopefully realize what causes your perception of time to clash with reality.
If you’ve never tried volunteering or meditation, now is the time, as both can positively influence your perception of time.
No matter how much you tweak your perception of time, there will always be some time lost.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Gets Stolen From Restaurants? Everything”

Theater, well-designed restaurants turned regular customers into cunning thieves.
In a story on the subject in 2002, the New York Times highlighted several items that had been stolen from notable restaurants.
Restaurant thieves beware: Anything that costs from $1,000 to $3,000 counts as grand larceny.
The celebrity hangout gastropub The Spotted Pig has more things stolen from it than any other restaurant, claims co-owner Ken Friedman.
One night in 2014., the restaurant’s namesake, a 2-foot-long ceramic antique from England, which was chained to the front, was stolen.
The country Italian restaurant Coltivare in the Heights is known for its locavore pizzas and 3,000-square-foot garden, the source for dishes like the Backyard Lettuce and Herb Salad. That guests have walked in and grabbed vegetables and fruit off the vine doesn’t put it in the hall of fame of stolen-from restaurants; what really earned it legend status was when.
At the reopened mega Japanese restaurant Megu, the signature plates are disappearing.
It’s proved relatively easy for someone to slip the plates-used for dishes like Yellowtail Kanzuri and the Matcha Crepe Cake-into a large handbag: The restaurant estimates that about twice a week someone takes one.
Under the category of things that are technically useless outside the restaurant, here’s something interesting: At Underbelly, which celebrates the wildly diverse Houston food scene, the wine list is styled like a comic book with corresponding art and graffitied blurbs.
At the Cal-Italian restaurant Love & Salt in Manhattan Beach, the vibrantly colored, Americana tin salt and pepper shaker cans that hold the checks are routinely taken.

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