Summary of “Mackinac Island Stone Skipping Competition”

Courtesy of the documentary skipping stones for fudge.
Two-foot waves were rolling across the lake, a taste of what lay ahead: We were going to the Mackinac Island Stone Skipping Competition-the oldest, most prestigious rock-skipping tournament in the United States, if not the world.
I looked down, saw a decent skipping stone, and picked it up.
I’d been skipping stones my whole life, ever since I was around my daughters’ ages, always getting better and better.
These were my people-the ones who could spend hours on a beach looking for just the right stone, who would fill bags and boxes with skippers from secret locations, who would throw until their arm gave way, lost in the simple sorcery of stone skipping.
Kurt “Mountain Man” Steiner practices skipping stones.
Kurt “Mountain Man” Steiner sorting his skipping stones.
As the stone spins, these points will push the stone up off the water, keeping it airborne and preventing it from sticking.
“If you spin it fast enough, the stone will essentially walk on those spokes,” Steiner told me, when I had called him for skipping advice.
Windermere Pointe Beach at the Iroquois Hotel, site of the Mackinac island stone skipping competition.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Millennial Obsession With Self-Care”

There is one generation that has been consistently defined by its obsessions: avocado toast, memes, Harry Potter … and self-care.
Today, self-care, as it’s defined by Gracy Obuchowicz, a facilitator and self-care mentor and coach in Washington, D.C., “Assumes that we’re OK as we are and we just need to take care of ourselves … Self-care alone is not enough. You need to have self-awareness too. Self-care plus self-awareness equals self-love.”
While self-care has been around for centuries, it has only recently been co-opted by stars such as Solange and consumerized into self-care kits.
They spend twice as much as boomers on self-care essentials such as workout regimens, diet plans, life coaching, therapy and apps to improve their personal well-being.
It found that students reported using the Web to identify self-care strategies, alternative therapies and other information related to nutrition and fitness.
Do a quick Google search and you’ll find hundreds of articles about self-care, occasionally accompanied with lists of advice such as “Go to a farmers market” or “Buy a new candle” or “Drive with the windows down.” So it comes as no surprise that the generation that takes advantage of the Internet the most is also the generation that devotes the most time and money to the $10 billion self-care industry.
Im said we might find ourselves comparing our lives to the perfection we see on the Internet, which leads us to utilizing online tools for self-care – and the cycle continues.
Im said the introduction of social media throughout the millennial generation has increased understanding of mental illnesses and decreased the stigma.
Beyond social media, Obuchowicz said she has noticed an uptick in the interest in self-care lately, particularly since the election.
Obuchowicz says it’s more than just social media that has pushed millennials to the forefront of the self-care discussion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Leftovers’ Examination of Life, Death, Einstein and Time Travel”

We all know that’s part of the package deal of being human, and if we don’t know that, we’re taught that by time, the slowest and most exacting teacher.
What if, for the briefest span of time, an observer could pause the hurtling energy of the universe and pin down every single place and time in which we exist? Everything seen, mapped, understood.
The gravity well of a black hole had hovered nearby, for such a long time.
Einstein was right: The passage of time depends on your perspective.
Slooowww motion: There was enough time to wish, from the bottom of my soul, for a different velocity, an alternate life.
These variations were there the whole time, or they are new.
Every single heartbreak I endured while going to the pharmacy, buying groceries, watching “Judge Judy” with mom, watching my father make coffee for the last time, his bones brittle and wrong – yes, Johnny Cash, I remember everything.
I thought the everyday aches I had to put to one side during a time of sheer survival had been dropped, had slunk away, had eroded over time.
Bearing witness is an act of love and a rebellion against that eternal asshole, time.
She wants to know that someone understands the magnitude of her loss, but who could? And at the same time, she doesn’t want to be defined by the unique conditions of her suffering.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon’s Brick-and-Mortar Bookstores Are Not Built for People Who Actually Read”

The books in the Amazon bookstore-assembled according to algorithm-feel like that, too.
They exist far less to serve the desires of the reader than to serve the needs of Amazon, a company whose twenty-year campaign to “Disrupt” bookstores has now killed off much of the competition, usurped nearly half of the U.S. book market, and brought it back, full circle, to books on shelves.
Greeting customers, front and center, is a “Highly Rated” table, featuring books that have received 4.8 stars or above on Amazon.com, among them Trevor Noah’s memoir, Chrissy Teigen’s cookbook, a book by the couple on the TV show “Fixer Upper,” and a book about kombucha.
The store, in other words, is designed to further popularize, on Amazon, that which is already popular on Amazon.
Some sections in the bookstore seem organized like an ill-advised dinner party: in nonfiction, James Baldwin sits next to David Brooks, who’s above Ta-Nehisi Coates, who’s next to a book called “Pantsuit Nation,” which is based on a pro-Hillary Clinton Facebook group.
There are a few types of books that are served well by the Amazon bookstore.
There are Amazon reviews underneath almost every title-Internet comments intruding on your book purchase by design.
A snippet underneath Rachel Dolezal’s memoir urges readers to check out its “Poignant depth.” In the children’s section, there is sometimes more text in the review blurbs than in the books themselves.
I saw “The Princess Diarist,” by Carrie Fisher, and remembered that I’d been wanting to read her previous book “Wishful Drinking,” but of course the store didn’t have it.
Finally, I found something I wanted to read: Lidia Yuknavitch’s novel “The Book of Joan.” I scanned its bar code: $17.70 with my Prime membership.

The orginal article.

Summary of “35 Things You Need to Give Up to Be Successful”

If you want the things happy people have, you must be happy to get those things.
If you want things wealthy people have, you must be and live wealthy to have those things.
As a result, I can’t spend 12 or 15 hours a day working like some people.
Most people aren’t moving toward their goals because they prioritize shallow work.
If you don’t enjoy the product of your work, how can you expect other people to?23.
There are people you already know who have information you need.
There are people you already know who can connect you with people you should know.
It’s easy to want other people to do it for you.
You’ll continue copying other people’s work.
Thus, the system was designed only for those who were really in need, not to create a culture of people being supported by others’ labor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Gmail Shortcuts Everybody Ought to Know”

What if there was a way to make sifting through that inbox easier? Enter Gmail shortcuts.
Here are 10 essential shortcuts everyone should know.
Need to send a quick email? Instead of scrolling around for that “New” option, press “c” while you’re in your inbox view instead. A new message will pop right up, ready and waiting to be mailed out to your chosen recipient.
Need to find a specific message, stat? Skip straight to the search bar by hitting the “/” key and watch your curser magically appear right where you need it.
Is a clean-slate inbox your daily dream? Once you’ve selected all your unread messages, click a quick “e” and archive them all in the process.
Whether you have one message selected or several, it’s easy to flag them all as important.
Looking to respond to more than just one email recipient at once? Instead of hitting the “r” key on your keyboard, tap the “a” key instead. Your response will automatically include everyone on the original message.
Pass the email you’re currently reading on to someone who needs to know what it entails with, you guessed it, just one key.
Click “f” to get started passing the message on stat.
A quick “Command” and “Enter” will get your message to its intended recipient in no time at all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tech is distracting and addictive, but it doesn’t have to be”

There’s a way to put technology back in its place, says Nir Eyal.
In his talk in Amsterdam he showed how we could turn these methods around to make technology work for us, instead of us working for it.
Many people tell me that they want to use technology less, but that their workplace doesn’t let them disconnect.
It’s not necessarily an addiction, because if they won the lottery they’d stop using those technologies, because they wouldn’t need to go back to work.
People constantly look to company leadership for the appropriate amount of technology to use.
Is a great example of that, despite being the product that most people associate with being constantly tethered to technology.
Eyal’s message is that it’s not technology that’s the problem, it’s the work culture around technology.
It’s not only social norms that we need to change we also need to fix how we use technology by ourselves.
There’s nothing inherently wrong or distracting about technology, we just need to adjust it to fit our needs.
We can’t go back to when things were simpler, but we sure can put technology back in its place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Twitter Is Being Gamed to Feed Misinformation”

The biggest problem with Twitter’s place in the news is its role in the production and dissemination of propaganda and misinformation.
The Fox News host Sean Hannity pushed the theory the loudest, but it was groups on Twitter – or, more specifically, bots on Twitter – that were first to the story and helped make it huge.
In many of the biggest misinformation campaigns of the past year, Twitter played a key role.
Specifically, Twitter often acts as the small bowel of digital news.
This makes Twitter a prime target for manipulators: If you can get something big on Twitter, you’re almost guaranteed coverage everywhere.
As a result, numerous cheap and easy-to-use online tools let people quickly create thousands of Twitter bots – accounts that look real, but that are controlled by a puppet master.
Because a single Twitter user can create lots of accounts and run them all in a coordinated way, Twitter lets relatively small groups masquerade as far larger ones.
“Bots allow groups to speak much more loudly than they would be able to on any other social media platforms – it lets them use Twitter as a megaphone,” said Samuel Woolley, the director for research at Oxford University’s Computational Propaganda Project.
The story later fell apart, but that night, Twitter bots went with it.
A Twitter spokesman said the company took bots seriously; it has a dedicated spam-detection team that looks out for bot-based manipulation, and it is constantly improving its tools to spot and shut down bots.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This chart spells out in black and white just how many jobs will be lost to robots”

When robots come for our jobs, the first people to fall will be those working in retail and fast food restaurants as well as the ubiquitous secretaries who are an indispensable part of the corporate world.
It may not happen overnight but slowly, machines are gaining on man’s turf and in a decade or two, about 50% of jobs in existence today will have gone the way of dinosaurs, or in this case, automation, according to Henrik Lindberg, chief technology officer at Swedish fintech company Zimpler.
Using data from a comprehensive employment report from University of Oxford, Lindberg drew up a monochrome chart, reproduced by Visual Capitalist, that illustrates a society that is increasingly relying on robots.
“As computers get better at, for example, perception-think self-driving car-those services jobs are likely next up to be replaced by machines,” said Jeff Desjardins, an editor of Visual Capitalist.
In the chart above, the black field shows jobs that will disappear with automation while the white represents those that are projected to survive.
It will also likely affect low-income workers more than those making six figures.
Still, even as mankind continues to cede the labor force to robots, it’s not necessarily the end of civilization as we know it.
“While machines destroy jobs, they also often create new ones,” said Desjardins, echoing Marc Andreessen’s view that robots will not replace people en masse.
To be sure, not all job losses can be blamed on robots.
As the graphic below shows, even without automation, the composition of the U.S. job market has changed over the years as the U.S. economy evolves, making some industries virtually obsolete while others thrive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Man who mowed lawn with tornado behind him says he ‘was keeping an eye on it.'”

A photo of a man in Alberta mowing a lawn with a tornado swirling behind him has been causing a storm on social media.
Cecilia Wessels snapped the picture of her husband, Theunis, on Friday evening as the twister passed near their home in Three Hills.
Wessels said she was woken by her nine-year-old daughter who was upset that there was something like a tornado in the sky, but her father wouldn’t come inside.
Theunis Wessels said the tornado was actually much further away than it appears in the photo, and that it was moving away from them.
There have been no reports of injuries from the tornado, although some other photos show downed trees and a barn with its roof ripped off.
“I literally took the picture to show my mum and dad in South Africa, ‘Look there’s a tornado,’ and now everyone is like, ‘Why is your husband mowing the lawn?'” Cecilia Wessels said Saturday.
“Our whole street, everyone was on their back patios taking pictures,” she said.
Theunis Wessels said he was keeping watch of his surroundings and saw the twister form as the swirling connected from the sky and the ground to form the funnel.
Both said tornadoes are not common in South Africa, but Theunis said he watched a TV program about storm chasers, so he’s familiar with them.
“It looks much closer if you look in the photo, but it was really far away. Well, not really far, far away, but it was far away from us,” he said.

The orginal article.