Summary of “The Legend of Baltimore Jack”

Baltimore Jack took his handle from the first line of “Hungry Heart,” Bruce Springsteen’s 1980 hit song: Got a wife and kids in Baltimore, Jack / I went out for a ride, and I never went back.
In the years between college and hiking, almost as if he was working toward abandonment of his birth persona, it appears that Adam began referring to himself as L.A. Tarlin, then Baltimore Jack Tarlin, and finally, to most, just Baltimore Jack.
The Appalachian Trail was a very different place in 1995, the year Baltimore Jack first set out.
Adam’s friendship with Miller became one of the few that threaded into the Baltimore Jack era, and she was one of the people to whom Adam could expose his deep sense of loss.
To a White Blaze commenter who questioned the nutritional value of Pop-Tarts as trail food, Jack countered: “Pop Tarts are a perfectly sensible thing for folks to eat at breakfast time.” Jack recommended at least four per meal.
Photos of Baltimore Jack starting in the late 2000s show a person who is unrecognizable from the handsome, slick Adam I knew.
Jack made the change part of his legend; strangers began to offer tributes of whiskey and Little Debbie snack cakes, bringing them directly to Jack or leaving them on the trail with notes.
A search of Appalachian Trail message boards led Mertz to Adam, who by then had become Baltimore Jack.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Managers Take Their Stress Out on Their Employees”

Even the senior executives that left the company indicated, when confiding with friends, that they were leaving because of the CEO. Adam is not alone.
At the end of each day, Adam filled out a Yes List, a simple checklist to solidify his new habits.
Adam was preparing to take his company public and had a long list of seemingly nitpicky details that needed to be cleaned up.
Half of Adam’s executives had never taken a company public.
By proactively sharing his list of hundreds of important tasks with his team, Adam helped his employees understand what he needed and why.
Adam learned to break down one of his long emails into five shorter ones and only send out the first.
People around him began to act faster, and Adam rarely had to send the subsequent emails because they figured things out on their own.
One direct report remarked that he had been dreading coming back to work with Adam and was thrilled to see him “1000% better.” Adam had transformed from the arrogant, disrespectful boss he remembered to someone who listened to his employees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Unadulterated Joy: An Oral History of ‘Step Brothers'”

Steenburgen said that her husband, Ted Danson, never joins her on movie sets, but made an exception for Step Brothers.
McKay: Late in the movie, Ferrell and Reilly come up to me and they’re just like, “Look, this movie’s going great, but we are both very tired today.
Part V: “Don’t You Dare Put That in the Movie” Step Brothers is less a film than it is a collection of sublime set pieces.
McKay: Our music supervisor on the movie, the great Hal Willner, from Saturday Night Live, he’s produced dozens of great records.
David Edelstein: One of the things I love about Step Brothers is watching the outtakes on the DVD, which are really hardly outtakes.
Riggle: People always ask, “What’s your favorite movie?” I always say Step Brothers.
When the movie had come out, I said, “I don’t know if you’ve seen this movie Step Brothers.
McKay: The whole nature of the movie is a lot of stories from when we were kids.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Boy Who Lived on Edges”

At 13, Adam climbed Mount Adams, a 12,276-foot stratovolcano, with his father and brother.
“Adam just didn’t have that. He and I had a relationship that, I think, is very, very rare between male peers. I’d never loved a girlfriend as much as I loved Adam Roberts.”
Another time, Cunningham descended the north face of the northwest ridge of Mount Adams one day after Adam had been there and was horrified to see the sweeping turns his friend had laid down, the signature of a skier moving at more than 30 miles an hour.
They wondered: Were Adam’s adult troubles caused by the same demons, reemerged? The boy with the welcoming smile now struggled to live normally.
Adam lived for days on end in the parking lot of Mount Baker.
Years ago, Judy says, when Adam was wracked by his eating disorder, “Almost every day he’d call and say, ‘I want to kill myself.'” Do you have any idea, she says, what it’s like for a mother to write the memorial service for her son-not once, or twice, but many times? Later, Adam routinely sent her as many as 400 texts per day.
Adam’s actions had stripped him even of the solace of skiing: during the summer of 2016, he was required to wear a GPS ankle bracelet, so he couldn’t wear a ski boot.
They hiked to a spot where the family had camped when Adam was a boy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Riding Along With a Night Stringer, Chasing Car Crashes for Local News”

The rain makes shootings unlikely too, in Adam’s opinion, but there might be car crashes, and if they’re bad enough those can sell.
Thirty-two, but with the short-cropped hair and stubble mustache of a fresh police recruit, Adam is what’s known in local news as a stringer: the photographers and videographers that cruise the city documenting accidents, crimes, disasters of all sizes in the hopes of selling their footage to media outlets faster than their competitors.
Inside his dark grey Ford Fusion is a utility belt of tools: two smartphones clipped above the car’s sat-nav and three dispatch radios running up to an antenna jutting out of the sunroof to increase their range, tuned to the frequencies of the FDNY, NYPD Special Operations Division, and the third swapping constantly to local precincts, the codes for which Adam has memorized.
The only difference with riders in his car is that Adam sends the audio from SOD into an Secret Service-style earpiece, filming between trips if proximity and opportunity align.
Parked outside a McDonalds in Gowanus where he’s just devoured a cheeseless triple cheeseburger, one of his three radios crackles and Adam mentally decodes: precinct, location, accident type, working the calculus of its value to New York TV and digital media by instinct.
A car behind us honks and Adam half-jokes, “He must not know what I do.”
The ruined Nissan probably won’t sell, but Adam uploads it anyway, shooting an email off to New York 1, CBS, Pix 11, and a dozen other stations, agonizing over whether midnight should be referred to as Saturday night or Sunday morning.
After a false start chasing a reported assault on the Grand Central Parkway, Adam hears a local precinct responding to an unconfirmed fight: ten people brawling with knives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Click’ Is Genius, and More Unpopular Opinions About Adam Sandler”

Adam Sandler has done some bad things in his career-lest we forget about this fake Dunkin’ Donuts commercial in Jack & Jill, or, for that matter, all of Jack & Jill-and in this day and age, perception of him as a creator is, well, not great.
Which is why, a day before Sandler’s next movie, The Meyerowitz Stories, is released, the Ringer staff has decided to reveal their true selves with a handful of very unpopular Adam Sandler opinions.
‘Little Nicky’ Was Ahead of Its Time Kate Knibbs: Adam Sandler is many things: a connoisseur of weird-voiced man-children, a bard of fart jokes, a sucker for the acting of Jon Lovitz.
An implication of Sandler and Aniston’s sham relationship is that she is not as beautiful or attention-worthy as Decker.
‘Click’ Is a Bleak, Genius Film Miles Surrey: Adam Sandler once made a pretty good episode of Black Mirror, and maybe you watched it.
Adam Sandler Deserved an Oscar for ‘Reign Over Me’ Andrew Gruttadaro: Reign Over Me is about a man who is deeply depressed and struggling to regain normalcy after losing his family on 9/11. Adam Sandler plays that man, and Don Cheadle plays that man’s old college roommate, who helps the former get his life back on track.
What’s more Jewish than doing a head count of famous people and claiming the quarter-Jews for our own? Sandler may not be Larry David or Mel Brooks, but he certainly gets this particular aspect of being a Member of the Tribe.
I remember sobbing through a climactic scene where Adam Sandler and Téa Leoni shout at one another about the hell bond that is marriage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Greatest Movie Props of All Time: From Lightsabers to Wilson”

Perry Blake, co-production designer: “It was a totally fabricated prop. We started with the hockey stick, in terms of the size of it. The bottom part was, more or less, like a hockey stick, but we also wanted to make it flat and smooth. As far as I know, there wasn’t anything like this that existed – it’s not like you could go online and buy them, and I don’t remember anybody having them.”We mocked them up and would bring them to director Dennis Dugan, and, you know, Adam is very involved in his movies, so he was testing them out and looking at them and deciding which one he liked best.
We wanted to have one ‘prove-it’ shot that was like a 25ft putt, one where Adam actually made it.
“I remember the day we were shooting that scene, it was basically like, OK, we’re just gonna sit here, and Adam’s gonna shoot the ball from way back there until he makes it in. Everyone was betting on how many it would be: Is it gonna take him more than five shots? Is it gonna take him 10 shots? Finally, when he made it in, everybody went crazy. It was a lot of fun.”

The orginal article.