Summary of “| SI.com”

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The orginal article.

Summary of “Your phone and TV are tracking you, and political campaigns are listening in”

Your phone and TV are tracking you, and political campaigns are listening in – Los Angeles Times.
Welcome to the new frontier of campaign tech – a loosely regulated world in which simply downloading a weather app or game, connecting to Wi-Fi at a coffee shop or powering up a home router can allow a data broker to monitor your movements with ease, then compile the location information and sell it to a political candidate who can use it to surround you with messages.
As a result, if you have been to a political rally, a town hall, or just fit a demographic a campaign is after, chances are good your movements are being tracked with unnerving accuracy by data vendors on the payroll of campaigns.
The RealOptions case turned out to be a harbinger for a new generation of political campaigning built around tracking and monitoring even the most private moments of people’s lives.
Just as the antiabortion organizations did around clinics, political campaigns large and small are building “Geo-fences” around locations from which they can fetch the unique identifying information of the smartphones of nearly everyone who attended an event.
“I don’t think a lot of people are aware their location data is being sent to whomever,” said Justin Croxton, a managing partner at Propellant Media, an Atlanta-area digital firm that works with political campaigns.
Which political campaigns and other clients receive all that tracking information can’t be traced.
Serge Egelman, research director of the Usable Security & Privacy Group at UC Berkeley’s International Computer Science Institute, said his team can unearth which opaque data brokerages are amassing information, but not which political campaigns or interest groups buy it from them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ashamed to work in Silicon Valley: how techies became the new bankers”

Greg is one of many people working in tech who are increasingly self-conscious about how the industry – represented by consumer-facing tech titans like Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Twitter and Uber – is perceived: as underregulated, overly powerful companies filled with wealthy tech bros and “Brilliant assholes” with little regard for the local communities they occupy.
Silicon Valley has taken over from Wall Street as the political bogeyman of choice, turning tech workers – like it or not – into public ambassadors for the 1%. “I would never say I worked at Facebook,” said one 30-year-old software engineer who left the company last year to pursue an alternative career.
“MBA jerks used to go and work for Wall Street, now wealthy white geeks go to Stanford and then waltz into a VC or tech firm.”
It’s a view echoed by one current Googler in her 20s, who is embarrassed by tech companies’ cluelessness about their reputation outside of the Silicon Valley bubble.
“Some of these folks aren’t the most socially gifted people and therefore suddenly having a culture encouraging this experience for them bleeds into everything, giving them a sense of self-importance and entitlement. It’s effectively like dealing with children all the time,” Greg said, referencing his time at Dropbox when people would “Fly around the office on these stupid scooters and skateboards”.
“Being in tech puts a badge on you. Things are going bad for a large section of the economy in this area and here’s a shiny beacon of people getting paid far too much for what they do. It’s a very easy target especially if you mark yourself as one,” he said.
All of this feeds into the perception that techies are, according to the former Facebooker, “Pod people” who aren’t part of the community.
“There’s a large and growing number of people who have negative emotions about how it is right now and really want to change it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NBA is turning its players into running, jumping billboards”

In the early days of professional American basketball, players ran around the court with jerseys bearing names like the Firestone Non-Skids and the General Electrics.
Not long after the NBA formed in 1946, team uniforms bore only numbers, cities and the team names we would come to love and hate – Lakers, Celtics, etc.
The league has decided to take a page from its two-bit roots and put ads on its jerseys again.
For an estimated $5 million to $10 million in revenue per team, the NBA will break with the rest of the Big Four of American sports – Major League Baseball, the National Hockey League and the National Football League – and follow the international soccer model instead. In that sport, a lack of commercial breaks during televised games helps justify the ads; in the NBA, it’s simple greed.
In 2014, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver told a sports industry conference, “As we see Champion’s League and English Premier League [soccer] televised in the U.S., I think it’s going to become more acceptable and more commonplace for our fans.” He called the ads “Inevitable,” implying he was powerless to stop such an obvious moneymaker.
Ads on jerseys were never “Inevitable.” If they were, we’d already have seen them across American sports.
Advertising Age suggests that the NBA was the logical league to make the ads-on-jerseys leap because its younger fans aren’t tradition-bound “Purists” like followers of baseball, or even football.
Poll data show that NBA fans skew progressive and they like the league’s forward-thinking stance on social justice issues.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Will Stop Reading Your Emails for Gmail Ads”

Google is stopping one of the most controversial advertising formats: ads inside Gmail that scan users’ email contents.
Alphabet Inc.’s Google Cloud sells a package of office software, called G Suite, that competes with market leader Microsoft Corp. Paying Gmail users never received the email-scanning ads like the free version of the program, but some business customers were confused by the distinction and its privacy implications, said Diane Greene, Google’s senior vice president of cloud.
Ads will continue to appear inside the free version of Gmail, as promoted messages.
Instead of scanning a user’s email, the ads will now be targeted with other personal information Google already pulls from sources such as search and YouTube.
Ads based on scanned email messages drew lawsuits and some of the most strident criticism the company faced in its early years, but offered marketers a much more targeted way to reach consumers.
Greene’s ability to limit ads, Google’s lifeblood, shows her growing clout at the company.
Since her arrival in late 2015, Google has poured investments into its cloud-computing and business software tools to catch up to Microsoft and Amazon.com Inc. Greene announced the changes on Friday in a blog post, where she wrote that G Suite has more than 3 million paying companies and had more than doubled its user base among large businesses in the past year.
Google doesn’t share its cloud division sales, but its “Other Revenues,” which includes those numbers, grew 49 percent to $3.09 billion in the first quarter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook’s Role in European Elections Under Scrutiny”

Facebook provides little information on how political parties use ads to reach undecided voters on the site.
The political ads shown to Mr. Dodd are being tallied by WhoTargetsMe?, a nonpolitical group that designed a digital tool to monitor Facebook’s role ahead of the British election.
Questions over the social network’s role in politics are particularly raw in Britain, where outside groups were accused of spending lavishly on Facebook during a heated campaign before a referendum on the country’s membership the European Union.
“Political advertising is fundamentally different; there’s a lot of concern about what’s being seen on Facebook,” said Sam Jeffers, the group’s co-founder and a former digital media strategist.
In the buildup to the election the data showed that the Liberal Democrats – who are likely to remain a minority presence in Parliament – posted the largest number of political ads on Facebook.
The number of ads seen by WhoTargetsMe? volunteers has also roughly doubled in the last month, though political messages still represented 2 percent of overall ads displayed in Facebook feeds, according to the group’s analysis.
The social networking giant also sponsored get-out-the-vote campaigns, and encouraged political groups to create Facebook pages to promote their messages.
The role of companies like Facebook in spreading online falsehoods is limited in Germany, Mr. Scott said, because social media does not play as significant a role in everyday politics as it does in the United States.

The orginal article.