Summary of “Communal living with kids”

Many cohousing kids talked about learning to play sports that their parents didn’t know anything about from various members of the community, learning to cook dishes that their own parents didn’t cook, and even getting spiritual and emotional counsel from people other than their parents when going through a challenging time.
Many cohousing kids talked about the power of being exposed to a wide range of professions through the adults in their communities.
Like Durrett, most cohousing kids have been coloring under a table or building Legos in proximity to more meetings than they could possibly count.
While most so-called typical families face food insecurity, strains on their time or energy, sickness, and any number of other challenges within the four walls of their own private homes, cohousing kids are raised in an environment where many of these things are treated as collective problems and possibilities for growth.
Helen Thomson, who grew up in Heartwood Cohousing near Durango, Colorado, from the age of 5 until she left for the University of Montana, explains: “I think that all of us who grew up in Heartwood are much better at communicating and working together than many other kids our age.”
Cohousing kids often have freedom to roam between houses and in the shared outdoor spaces, even as little kids.
Many of the kids who grew up in cohousing attest to having a different way of moving through the world than most people.
For all its potential flaws, almost all of the young adults I interviewed said that, given the chance, they would raise their own kids in cohousing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How much you have to make to be in the top 1 percent in your state”

From the end of World War II through the early 1970s, the average income growth of the bottom ninety-nine percent of earners roughly tripled the 34 percent growth rate among the wealthiest one percent.
The average income for the top one percent spiked by 216.4 percent from 1973 to 2007, but it increased by just 15.4 percent for all other earners.
From 2009 to 2015, the average income for the wealthiest Americans grew by 33.9 percent, more than triple the income growth of 10.3 percent among the remaining ninety-nine percent.
Any family earning at least $422,000 a year ranks among the top one percent of earners nationwide.
24/7 Wall Street reviewed data compiled by the Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit nonpartisan think tank, to identify the minimum income threshold of the top one percent of earners in each state.
In New York, a state where the one percent earns at least $550,174 a year, the average income among one percenters is $2.2 million – 44 times the average income of $49,617 among the bottom ninety-nine percent.
Nine of the 10 states with the lowest income threshold for the top one percent have a lower bachelor’s degree attainment rate than the comparable national rate of 31.3 percent.
To identify the annual income necessary to be in the top 1 percent of earners in each state, 24/7 Wall Street reviewed “The New Gilded Age: Income Inequality in the U.S. by State,” an Economic Policy Institute report published in July 2018.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Age Appropriate”

Who said being a parent was required in terms of contributing to society? I had plenty to offer kids; I wanted them in my life, even if they weren’t mine.
Frozen in my parents’ belief systems about me were at least three views: I was bad with money, I was extremely sensitive and probably needed to develop a thicker skin, and, most generally and undeniably, I was forever who I used to be, the teenager under their roof, even when there was a new roof above our ongoing dance of parent-child dynamics.
My parents treated me alternately like I was a child and an adult, feeding me and then telling me things I didn’t want to know.
My parents treated me alternately like I was a child and an adult, feeding me and then telling me things I didn’t want to know, about various ailments, or their relationship, or how something I was doing wasn’t the way they’d do it.
No matter how old I got, we were always somewhere between a friend relationship and the relationship of parent and child.
My parents would listen and try to advise, but it would inevitably sting: “You can’t just work, you need to make time for other things, too,” my dad would say, at the same time that I was thinking, “I only have to work harder! I can’t do anything but work! You just don’t understand!”.
The practical parent, he pointed out the obvious – where would the kittens go while I was still in the Airbnb? His daughter would be renting an apartment in the city with three strangers in the fall.
In the end, we did not get the kittens for innumerable totally legitimate reasons, and because of that, and everything else – the difficulty of being whatever age you are, when you’re in it, the neverending push-pull of want and need and can and can’t, the parental yes and the parental no – the next day, I found Ezra’s daughter crying in the kitchen, her head on his shoulder, much the same way I’d cried with my own parents a couple of weeks before.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Profile: Maira Kalman, Author and Illustrator”

Not all her fans think of Maira Kalman primarily as a writer, but that’s how she described herself to me when we met last month.
My excuse for writing about Kalman is the reissue of several stories for children that she published in the 1990s, starring a dog called Max.
In those texts, her other work for children, and her work for adults, Kalman is the remix artist she describes above, one for whom image and word are intertwined and of equal importance.
In her work for adults, Kalman is almost a diarist, which breeds a certain deceptive sense of familiarity.
The bare bones of her life, gleaned from our conversation and her books: Kalman was born in Israel, in 1949, and her family relocated to the States when she was still a toddler.
In Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Everything, a children’s biography of the statesman, Kalman writes candidly about the man.
The book succeeds because Kalman is so forthright, the rare adult willing to admit to kids that scary things happen.
In My Favorite Things, Kalman writes, “The artist Charlotte Salomon lived in this room in Berlin in the 1930s. She painted and wrote about her family in a book called ‘Opera or Life.’ People were always coming and going and dying. She was killed in the Holocaust. Which brings us inevitably to sorrow.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Study: This is how long it takes adults to make new friends”

In a landmark study, a University of Kansas professor now believes he knows why making friends as an adult is just so difficult.
The study: Published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Associate Professor of Communications Studies, Jeffrey Hall, found that it takes about 50 hours to cement a friendship between two adults.
That is to say, going from mere acquaintance – that person you find yourself waxing poetic about the utility of avocados in the super market every week with – to a casual friend.
If you’re ready to kick it up a notch, it’ll take about another 40 hours to be actual friends – the type you might ask to water your plants while you’re on vacation, or to help you move.
For good friends, you’re looking at an investment of about 200 hours, at minimum.
These are the friends you communicate with using a series of shifty glances and grunts, and they just sort of understand what you mean.
Takeaway: As an adult, a common gripe I hear from other adults is how difficult it is to make new friends once you’re past the days of bonding over a shared hatred of trigonometry.
Study reveals number of hours it takes to make a friend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Vaccine Rates Against Shingles, Flu And Pneumonia Still Lag”

Vaccine Rates Against Shingles, Flu And Pneumonia Still Lag : Shots – Health News Beyond annual flu shots, older adults need protection against shingles, pneumonia, tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, federal health officials say.
Federal officials have recommended a vaccine against shingles that is more effective than an earlier version at protecting older adults from the painful rash.
“I’m healthy; I’ll get that when I’m older” is what adult patients often tell Dr. Michael Munger when he brings up an annual flu shot or a tetanus-diphtheria booster or the new shingles vaccine.
The most significant change was to recommend Shingrix, the shingles vaccine that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration last fall, over an older version of the vaccine.
The older vaccine, Zostavax, can still be given to adults who are 60 or older, but Shingrix is preferred, according to the agency.
Although shingles vaccination rates have inched upward in recent years, only a third of adults who were 60 or older in 2016 had received the Zostavax vaccine, the CDC says.
Still, patients, should confirm their coverage before requesting the new shingles vaccine, health care providers say; insurers typically add new vaccines gradually to their formularies after they have been added to the recommended list.
Vaccines to prevent influenza and pneumonia are covered without a copayment under Medicare Part B, which covers outpatient care, while other vaccines – including the shingles vaccine – are typically covered under Part D drug plans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I downloaded all my Facebook data”

Those are just a few of the details contained in the archive of my Facebook history, which I downloaded on Monday.
My Facebook is basically a mausoleum of my 20s; a repository of old photos, status updates and conversations with people who have drifted out of my life.
Looking through your downloaded data reveals certain information you ordinarily wouldn’t see.
Facebook assigns one of two labels to what it calls your Friend Peer Group: Starting Adult Life or Established Adult Life.
Facebook doesn’t appear to classify your face into categories like Adult Face That’s Starting to Look Old but I wouldn’t put it past them.
If you haven’t downloaded your Facebook history I highly recommend doing so.
Seeing your digital life organised into folders is something of a wakeup call, particularly when you realise the data Facebook lets you download is just the tip of the iceberg of what it knows about you.
After looking through my Facebook history, I felt inspired to archive my entire digital footprint.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Damaging Parenting Behaviors That Keep Children From Growing Into Leaders”

As a parent myself, I’ve learned that all the wisdom and love in the world doesn’t necessarily protect you from parenting in ways that hold your children back from thriving, gaining independence and becoming the leaders they have the potential to be.
Tim is a best-selling author of more than 25 books, including Generation iY: Our Last Chance to Save Their Future, Artificial Maturity: Helping Kids Meet the Challenges of Becoming Authentic Adults, and the Habitudes® series.
If parents remove risk from children’s lives, we will likely experience high arrogance and low self-esteem in our growing leaders.
Kids get used to someone rescuing them: “If I fail or fall short, an adult will smooth things over and remove any consequences for my misconduct.” When in reality, this isn’t even remotely close to how the world works, and therefore it disables our kids from becoming competent adults.
As parents, we tend to give them what they want when rewarding our children, especially with multiple kids.
Why do parents engage in these behaviors? Do these behaviors come from fear or from poor understanding of what strong parenting is?
Tim says: “It’s important for parents to become exceedingly self-aware of their words and actions when interacting with their children, or with others when their children are nearby. Care enough to train them, not merely treat them to a good life. Coach them, more than coddle.”
How are you parenting your children? Are you sacrificing their long-term growth for short-term comfort?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Peter Shankman Shares The Gift Of ADHD: How To Leverage It For Phenomenal Success”

Adult ADHD symptoms may not be as clear as ADHD symptoms in children.
In my previous work as a family therapist, I met with children and adults who were dealing with the impact of ADHD on behavior, relationships, and success.
There are many ways adults can learn to leverage ADHD and turn it into a tool for great success and productivity.
This month, I was thrilled to learn about the new book, Faster Than Normal: Turbocharge Your Focus, Productivity, and Success with the Secrets of the ADHD Brain, written by media entrepreneur Peter Shankman.
In the book, Peter shares hard-won insights and daily hacks for turning ADHD into a secret weapon for anyone who wants to establish a healthier, more fulfilling daily routine.
He’s appeared on the Today Show, CNN, MSNBC, Fox, CNBC Bloomberg TV, and HBO and hosts the top-rated podcast Faster Than Normal, helping people to understand that ADD and ADHD are a gift, not a curse.
Peter wasn’t diagnosed with ADHD until his mid-thirties, and he spent years learning how to “Self-modify” his lifestyle-first just for survival, but then for incredible success.
Kathy Caprino: How and when did you discover that your ADHD was not a deterrent to your success but instead the cause?

The orginal article.