Summary of “What Separates Champions from ‘Almost Champions’?”

Whereas super champions were playing in premiere leagues and/or competing on national teams, almost champions had achieved well at the youth level but were playing in less prestigious leagues as adults.
The researchers found that super champions were characterized by an almost fanatical reaction to challenge.
Almost champions also loved the thrill of competition, but they remembered having an aversion toward practice and at times felt forced to pursue their respective sport.
As one almost champion put it: “I loved fighting, but the training was just a chore.
Almost champions were focused on external benchmarks, like national rankings or how they compared to rivals, a mind-set the researchers speculate explains why almost champions got discouraged during rough patches.
The parents of almost champions were an ever-present factor, hovering over their every move.
“My parents, my dad especially, was always there, shouting instructions from the touchline, pushing me to practice at home,” remembers an almost champion.
” No surprise that almost champions changed coaches frequently whereas super champions maintained long-term relationships.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Argument for Waking Up Crazy Early”

I have some unsolicited work advice, which is that if you don’t know how to deal with a problem, or a whole host of problems, try getting up obscenely early.
When I helped start a website almost a decade ago, I didn’t know anything about how to do it, but I knew that at the very minimum I could wake up early as hell.
At the time, the early-morning routine stuck, immediately, in part because it felt good, and in retrospect I’m kind of stunned by how many problems something so simple did actually solve.
Of course, waking up early gives you a surge of power; you feel superior, smug.
It’s also kind of like being vegan – I’m pretty sure there’s no one I talked with back then who I didn’t tell in some way, as quickly as possible, that I got up at 5 a.m. Back then I also felt a little flicker of knowing that such an extreme routine can’t last forever, so I kind of relished it.
Oh, and despite it being a very private, solitary time, getting up crazy early also feels a little like joining a club.
In my experience, waking up obscenely early allows you to wear two hats, and the wearing of the first one allows for a much more peaceful wearing of the second one, if that makes sense.
I’m not saying that getting up early is a perfect routine that can last forever, but it’s maybe a turbo-charge button to press when confronted with a seemingly unsolvable problem or set of problems.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Next Time You Want to Complain at Work, Do This Instead”

I had been on the phone for over an hour, almost all of that time listening to Frank*, a senior manager at Jambo, a technology company, complain about his boss, Brandon.
I added up all the time I’d spent listening to people at Jambo complain about each other that week: 3 hours and 45 minutes.
My friend, the legendary executive coach Marshall Goldsmith, interviewed more than 200 of his clients and what he discovered matched previous research he read, but found hard to believe: “a majority of employees spend 10 or more hours per month complaining – or listening to others complain – about their bosses or upper management. Even more amazing, almost a third spend 20 hours or more per month doing so.”
When we complain about someone else, the uncomfortable feelings begin to dissipate because complaining releases the pent up energy.
When we complain to people who seem to agree with us – and we almost always complain to people who seem to agree with us – we solicit comfort, camaraderie, connection, support, and justification, which counteracts the bad feelings with some fresh, new good ones.
We almost never complain directly to the person who is catalyzing our complaints, we complain to our friends and families.
Then you go to the next meeting and you complain about the person who just yelled.
Let complaining – and the feeling that leads to complaining – be the red flag that it should be: something wrong is happening and you are probably not powerless to do something about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Are Looking for Reasons to Be Happy, You’ll Probably Find Them”

For me, one of the most profound realizations I have made over recent years is the understanding that if I’m looking for a reason to be x., I’ll probably be able to find it.
On the opposite side of the spectrum, if that same person started looking for reasons to be happy, they would almost certainly find those as well.
If you’re looking for reasons to be scared, you’ll find them.
If you’re looking for reasons to be mad, you’ll find them.
If you’re looking for reasons to be encouraged, you’ll find them.
If you’re looking for reasons to be grateful, you’ll find them.
If you’re looking for reasons to be confident, you’ll find them.
If you’re looking for reasons to be pessimistic about the future, you’ll find them.

The orginal article.