Summary of “Amazon owns a whole collection of secret brands, USPTO trademark filings reveal”

The only indication that any of these other brands might have an affiliation with Amazon is the fact that their company pages-like this one from Arabella-say that their products are “Exclusively for Prime members.” It’s not clear that they’re exclusive because they are Amazon products, rather than products from companies that have struck deals with Amazon.
Calls and emails to the intellectual-property lawyer, James F. Struthers, who filed these trademark applications-and has filed some of the above applications for Amazon, and other Amazon trademarks-went unanswered.
Many of these brands also appear under the “Amazon Fashion” section of the company’s website, right next to the generic house brands that Amazon owns.
When reached for comment about its branding strategy, Amazon did not have an explicit answer, but a spokesperson confirmed the following brands are indeed Amazon’s: “Amazon has a range of brands including Amazon Basics, Happy Belly, Mama Bear, Pinzon, Presto!, Wickedly Prime, Goodthreads, Amazon Essentials, Mae, Ella Moon, Buttoned Down, The Fix and Lark & Ro.”.
Amazon has confirmed that some of the brands Quartz uncovered-including Goodthreads, The Fix, and Presto!-are indeed house brands, even though they are not listed as such on Amazon’s website, and Amazon’s name does not appear on the USPTO trademarks.
Mark DiMassimo, direct-economy expert and CEO of the New York-based advertising agency DiMassimo Goldstein, told Quartz there’s logic to Amazon’s clandestine approach to house brands, as the Amazon brand name can only stretch so far.
“There are limits to the Amazon brand that Amazon would be wise not to cross.”
Perhaps what Amazon is trying to do as it rapidly expands into new businesses-especially business areas where it might not have forged partnerships with well-known brands-is to give the impression to customers that there are tons of options to choose from, when in fact, they’re really just choosing between different Amazon brands.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Amazon’s Influence Grows, Marketers Scramble to Tailor Strategies”

Dooley Tombras, the firm’s executive vice president, said it sent products to influential Amazon reviewers in hopes of soliciting positive feedback and conducted “Guerrilla sampling,” like holding events “Where we’re handing out a product and we’ve got teams there with iPads and we’re encouraging people to write reviews of a product on the spot.”
Brands can pay Amazon to customize the middle of pages with large advertorial images and information – which in the protein powder’s case included photos of men working out; a recipe for “Birthday cake pancakes” made with the chocolate-flavored whey; and a chart featuring six of its other products, like Micronized Creatine Powder, explaining when and how they should be consumed.
Amazon has long been an online shopping behemoth, but marketers now know it is playing an increasingly important role in how people discover and learn about their goods.
“E-commerce is nothing new, it’s been going on for decades, and Amazon is nothing new, it’s been successful for decades – but now they are becoming much more of a dominant force in brand discovery,” said Sarah Hofstetter, the chief executive of the digital agency 360i.Its quick success in categories like apparel and the popularity of voice search emphasized that, Ms. Hofstetter said.
The agencies said in the release that more than half of United States consumers now started online product searches on Amazon, compared with 28 percent on search engines and 16 percent on retailer websites.
In an interview in Cannes, France, last month, Mr. Sorrell said his firm wanted to do more with clients and Amazon, but noted there were major questions around how brands might gain access its customer data and compete on voice search.
Amazon Media Group, the company’s growing advertising division, has been looking to assuage such concerns while touting new ways marketers can reach people on Amazon.
“We can help a brand if they’re selling their products on Amazon understand when a customer is exposed to an ad and, when they clicked on an ad, if they bought something, and then we can help them tailor their marketing messages and their creative to each different step.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Mind-Boggling Ascent of Amazon and Jeff Bezos”

The stocks at the very top remained the same: Exxon Mobil, followed by Apple, General Electric, Microsoft and IBM.But further down the list, Amazon appears for the first time.
Only 30 stocks – Amazon is now one of them – account for more than 30 percent of all of the market’s wealth creation in that 90-year period.
If you had invested $1,000 in Amazon in July 2002 – and had held onto your shares – that money would be worth $83,000 today.
It has built the Death by Amazon Index, which it describes as “a way to track the performance of the companies most affected by the rise of Amazon.com.” Those companies – there are now 54 of them – include Barnes & Noble, Costco, Best Buy, GameStop, Macy’s, Nordstrom, Sears, Target, CVS Caremark and Rite Aid and Walmart.
The Death by Amazon Index has declined 18.9 percent through Monday – trailing Amazon by almost 55 percentage points.
No Amazon investor has as much money in the company, or has benefited as much from the stock’s rise, as Mr. Bezos.
Unlike Mr. Gates, who has diversified his portfolio and has been giving money to charity at a rapid pace, Mr. Bezos continues to bet heavily on Amazon.
For now, the mighty Amazon wealth-creation machine continues to roar.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon Web Services versus Microsoft Azure, Google, Oracle”

Amazon got there first, which is why it’s so far ahead. Amazon Web Services sits at the top of the cloud computing mountain.
“There’s no question that Amazon is still the preferred platform for developers,” said Ed Anderson, an analyst who covers cloud services at research firm Gartner.
Despite its remarkable turnaround in the cloud, Microsoft is still lagging behind Amazon, although it’s hard to say by how much, because the company doesn’t break out its Azure revenue numbers specifically.
Microsoft recently announced that its cloud computing business as a whole – including not just Azure, but Office 365 and its other cloud services – is now pulling in revenue at an $18.9 billion annualized pace.
Way back in 2015, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella called the cloud game a “Seattle race” between Amazon and Microsoft, with most others irrelevant.
Google Cloud is still relatively small compared with Amazon and Microsoft, but its momentum is picking up.
The main claim to fame for Oracle Cloud is that it’s capable of running Oracle databases lightning-fast.
What’s more, both Amazon and Microsoft offer services that allow customers to quickly migrate Oracle databases to their clouds.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon chases multibillion-dollar B2B business with Amazon Business”

Amazon Business is off to a promising start, according to Bill Burkland, the head of Amazon Business in the UK. “The US acquired over 400,000 businesses and a billion dollars in revenue for Amazon Business in its first year of business,” he said during an interview at the company’s London office, adding that there were 45,000 sellers on Amazon Business in the US by the end of the first year.
Amazon wants companies to go to Amazon Business to buy everything from new computers and A4 paper to toilet cleaner and power tools.
Amazon Prime members who set up a business account can also take advantage of free shipping on Amazon Business.
The Amazon Business platform – yet to get any dedicated integration with Alexa, Amazon’s virtual assistant – has proved popular with small and medium-sized businesses from the get-go, but Amazon is keen to get larger enterprises with thousands of staff buying in bulk, as that can drive revenue higher.
Interestingly, Burkland said it didn’t matter to Amazon whether businesses did their shopping through Amazon.co.uk or Amazon Business.
Amazon Business could become the next AWS. Amazon has several large businesses beyond its well-known e-commerce platform, including a video-streaming platform, a music-streaming platform, a grocery-delivery service, and an audiobook service.
Burkland compared Amazon Business to Amazon’s enormous cloud company, Amazon Web Services, which hit over $12 billion in revenue in 2016.
All the engineering efforts for Amazon Business happen outside the UK, but Amazon has hired dedicated sales, marketing, procurement and alliance teams for Amazon Business locally.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Will Service Work Look Like Under Amazon?”

Some said that with a few twists of the dial and a better-educated class of consumers, service work could be remade into something more careerlike, offering employees structure, predictability and dignity – and wealthier customers a form of absolution.
The company has never put forth a rosy vision of the future of service labor.
Amazon warehouse work is hard, often subcontracted and kept out of sight of consumers.
Amazon’s attitude toward labor is emblematic of the culture it grew out of – and an augur of the service economy that’s on the rise today.
Amazon’s plans for Whole Foods are the subject of plenty of speculation.
One thing is certain: The Mackey marketing playbook – bringing labor to the fore in order to assure customers that they are A-O.K. and in good hands – has little to offer Amazon, which can and does regard labor as a simple commodity.
In contrast to Whole Foods, which focuses in its marketing on fair-trade and locally sourced offerings, Amazon is made up of a dizzying array of supply chains that are effectively invisible: not hidden, just easily omitted from the consumer experience.
Amazon need not bother to tell a story; in fact, its goal is to reduce the retail story to a single button, an instant, an unprecedentedly complex process taken for granted.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon Prime is on pace to become more popular than cable TV”

Within a couple of years, more U.S. households could be subscribers of Amazon Prime than cable or satellite TV, according to recent estimates of Amazon’s popular shipping and entertainment service.
Based on Morningstar’s estimates of the average number of Prime memberships per household, that suggests about 66 million households have Amazon Prime memberships in 2017.
According to these estimates, more U.S. households may have an Amazon Prime subscription than a pay TV subscription in as soon as two years.
How we got there: If the number of Amazon Prime households increases by roughly the same pace it has, on average, for the past four years – almost 12 million per year – the number of Prime households in 2019 would be around 89 million.
Amazon knows that Prime is the core of its retail business: Prime members spend more in a year than non-Prime members do, shop more frequently than others and price-compare less, according to studies.
Correction: A previous version of this post and chart incorrectly displayed estimated Prime memberships as Prime households.
To more accurately estimate Prime households, we divided the number of memberships for the past three years by 1.2 and divided earlier years by 1.1.
We’ve updated the number of estimated U.S. households with Amazon Prime in 2017 to 66 million, instead of our previous figure of 79 million, which reflected memberships.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Five Questions You Need to Answer About Your Startup’s Strategy”

Michael Porter wrote the seminal book on strategy in the early 1980s.
Called Competitive Strategy, I think it should be required for anyone starting a company.
Strategy is a seemingly murky amorphous intangible concept, but Porter brilliantly prescribes the five questions strategy should answer.
Amazon’s consumer value proposition is simple: the most selection at the best prices delivered fastest to all internet consumers in the US. How do you tailor the value chain to suit your company? Porter wrote about two different types of value chains: internal value chains and external ones.
As Joan Magretta writes in Understanding Michael Porter, “The essence of strategy and competitive advantage lies in the activities, and choosing to perform activities differently or to perform different activities from those of rivals.” This is what Porter means by tailoring the value chain to suit your company’s strategy: picking the internal activities that will differentiate it.
What trade-offs does your business offer to differentiate itself from competitors? Every strategy has a trade-off.
How strong is the value proposition across the value chain? This is a nuanced question that tries to get at the leverage the strategy creates in the business.
How does your strategy endure over time? If market conditions change, does your strategy survive? Bezos insulated Amazon’s strategy from the fickleness of the consumer by promising them three things they would always want: more, faster, cheaper.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I’m never signing up for Amazon Prime”

It’s open buffet season on consumer goods, and Amazon has that Prime ticket dangling in front of our ravenous faces.
Browse through Amazon even without the hyperactivity of Prime Day and you’ll see that deals are the norm rather than the exception.
Amazon Prime makes it unbelievably easy to shop unthinkingly.
That phenomenon has been so prominent with clothes that Amazon formalized it with the introduction of Amazon Prime Wardrobe last month.
Amazon’s presence in online retail is so influential nowadays that the majority of other major US retailers are throwing their own mini sales to fend off the effects of Prime Day.
As of today, this is a totally consumer-friendly effect of Amazon’s growing domination, but what happens over the long run? What if Walmart and every other retailer never catches up to Amazon and Jeff Bezos’ company ends up in a truly dominant position with no meaningful competition? Bezos himself advocates sternly against complacency, but having a monopolistic retailer of everything is a bad dependency to develop.
Everything about Prime that feels unbelievably cheap is only so because of the unbelievably cheap way that Amazon deals with the people discharging its duties.
You’ve got your own priorities in life and, in all honesty, nobody’s going to fix global injustice by disregarding Prime Day and taking a nice walk outside instead. But it makes me feel good to do exactly that, and so – in the ultimate expression of consumer choice – I’m opting not to consume Amazon’s enchanting deals elixir.

The orginal article.

Summary of “No Mercy No Malice”

AMZN + WFM = $1T. Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods, should it close, is the white flag in Amazon’s march to a trillion.
Amazon / Whole Foods will be the fourth-largest grocer in the US, and will likely post growth rates no $10B+ retailer, sans Amazon, has registered.
Amazon Media Group will now be able to sell online and offline media.
Amazon will use Whole Foods as an additional benefit of Prime, and more households will have Prime than cable TV within three years.
Operationally, it’s a shitshow, and even Amazon will likely struggle with the complexity of stores.
Amazon will shore up their brick-and-mortar competence, and dominance of affluent homes, and acquire Nordstrom or Macy’s.
As consumers find their neighbor / dad / aunt no longer has a job courtesy of Amazon, a state District Attorney will realize the fastest path to the Governor’s Mansion is to go after Amazon and will call for a breakup.
In sum, great for Amazon shareholders and consumers bad for everyone else.

The orginal article.