Summary of “27 books that can change your life forever”

“Amazon synopsis:”This classic poetry collection, which is both outrageously funny and profound, has been the most beloved of Shel Silverstein’s poetry books for generations.
“I almost never reread books, but I’ve returned to this one over the years. It’s about high schoolers, but it’s relatable no matter where you are in life. It shows how dark and harsh the world can be, but also that there are good things and good people if you stop to appreciate them. Something about that dichotomy leaves me stuck on this book no matter how many times I’ve read it.” -Emmie Martin, Your Money reporter.
Amazon synopsis: “In ‘I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This,’ [White] shares her secrets to success. A witty, wise, straight-talking career guide for women, ‘I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This’ is the perfect book for the current economic climate, whether you’re just starting out, re-entering the workforce after maternity leave, or simply looking for a career change; essential tips and bold strategies from a gutsy innovator who helped increase Cosmo’s circulation by half a million copies per month.”
“A word of mouth phenomenon since its first publication, ‘The Power of Now’ is one of those rare books with the power to create an experience in readers, one that can radically change their lives for the better.”
This magnificent book shows how radical change can be fostered in situations that seem insurmountable, and it also shows how a meaningful life can be created, as Farmer – brilliant, charismatic, charming, both a leader in international health and a doctor who finds time to make house calls in Boston and the mountains of Haiti – blasts through convention to get results.
At the heart of this book is the example of a life based on hope, and on an understanding of the truth of the Haitian proverb ‘Beyond mountains there are mountains’: as you solve one problem, another problem presents itself, and so you go on and try to solve that one too.
“The book follows observant ‘wallflower’ Charlie as he charts a course through the strange world between adolescence and adulthood. First dates, family drama, and new friends. Sex, drugs, and ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show.’ Devastating loss, young love, and life on the fringes. Caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it, Charlie must learn to navigate those wild and poignant roller-coaster days known as growing up.”
“My parents first read ‘Love You Forever’ to me when I was 3 or 4 years old, and I’ve probably reread it a thousand times since. The sentimental children’s book taught me a few important lessons about life and death, the unbreakable bond shared between a parent and their child, and, perhaps most important, a lesson about the existence of unconditional love … all of which changed my life in important ways. My younger self found much comfort in knowing that the love my parents had for me as a child, and I for them, was not something anyone could ever outgrow.” -Jacquelyn Smith, careers editor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon just explained how Whole Foods fits into its plan for world domination”

There was a rather remarkable moment on Amazon’s third-quarter earnings call yesterday where Brian Olsavsky, the company’s chief financial officer, laid out everything Amazon thinks it can do with its $13.7 billion acquisition of Whole Foods Market.
As I said, there’ll be a lot of work together between Prime Now, AmazonFresh, Whole Foods, Whole Foods products on the Amazon site, Amazon Lockers at the Whole Foods stores.
We think we’ll be also developing new store formats and everything else just as we talked about in the past before Whole Foods: Amazon Books stores, Amazon Go, and the opportunity that that technology presents.
Around some Whole Foods locations, it began installing Amazon Lockers, large orange lockers where Amazon customers can pick up online orders and drop off returns.
“So we see a lot of value in that as well.” Of course, it takes time and money to build a network of stores akin to Apple’s, which is why Amazon did the next best thing: It bought Whole Foods and its roughly 430 upscale stores in a deal that, after the market weighed in approvingly, practically paid for itself.
What became clear in yesterday’s earnings call is that Amazon sees Whole Foods as its nexus of brick-and-mortar power.
Whole Foods will be where online meets offline for Amazon and its consumers, merging a variety of Amazon fulfillment and delivery operations with in-store customer experiences.
Whole Foods will be a testing ground for Amazon’s other experiments in physical retail, be they Amazon Books stores, the mostly automated Amazon Go convenience stores, or something else entirely.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s precedent for Amazon competing with so many companies. It doesn’t end well.”

“I hear Amazon more than any other company, by a long shot.” That panic was on public display the day Amazon announced it had acquired the Whole Foods supermarket chain.
The aim is not to make money on any particular service; Amazon likely lost $7.2 billion on shipping last year and is selling hardware supporting its virtual assistant Alexa around or below cost.
Amazon, unlike its Silicon Valley counterparts, does not prioritize a technology platform that churns out profits while third party developers take on the risk of building applications to sell to customers.
“The government can’t even make the claim that Amazon has a monopoly on retail, and that’s their strongest position,” he says.
Modern antitrust theory, rooted in the ideas of “Consumer harm” from monopolists’ high prices, misses the threat posed by Amazon, Khan argues.
The structural advantages Amazon wields over competitors gives its the ability to price products below cost and restrict access to customers.
“The more goods and services Amazon sells, the more customers it has, and the more likely it becomes that more buyers and sellers will use Amazon, especially if competitors vanish or falter,” writes Cusumano.
“With weak or no competitors, Amazon is also free to raise prices.” Its Prime membership program is effectively a way to make shopping anywhere but Amazon more expensive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google and Amazon bet on artificial intelligence versus Apple”

Gadgets are going through a major change AI and cloud computing are more important than “Speeds and feeds” The shift benefits Google and Amazon and poses a big risk for Apple.
So far, it’s Google and Amazon leading the charge, even as this shift stands to hit hardware-centric companies like Apple hardest.
Google baked all kinds of artificial intelligence goodness into the Pixel 2.
The Google Assistant is very good – so good, that Apple should be embarrassed about how far behind Siri is.
Suddenly, by applying its considerable edge in artificial intelligence, Google has transformed an unremarkable little machine into a flagship.
While Apple has been investing heavily in R&D, it still can’t match the progress made by Amazon, Google, or Microsoft in AI and cloud computing – you only need to look at the vast difference between what Alexa and Google Assistant can do, versus the limitations of Apple’s Siri.
A lot of the smartest apps for iPhone come from Google itself, including the popular Google Photos app.
It’s no coincidence that Amazon and Google operate their own cloud computing platforms for outside app developers to use.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple is not America’s favorite tech company”

When asked how much they enjoyed using a company’s products and services, Apple scored the lowest among the big five technology companies – Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft – in the category for both “Somewhat liked” and “Greatly liked.” Among those expressing negative sentiment, Apple scored better than Facebook, yet still lower than Amazon, Google, and Microsoft.
On the topic of whether respondents would recommend Apple products and services to friends and family, the company again fell behind Google and Amazon, both of which garnered responses of either “Somewhat likely” to “Extremely likely” from more than 90 percent of survey participants.
Participants trusted Apple less than even Google, a company with a primary business model of collecting consumer data for targeting advertisements.
For passion, as measured by how much a participant would care if the company disappeared tomorrow, Apple came in last among the big five, with less than 40 percent of participants saying they would care “Very much” if the company and its products disappeared tomorrow, and nearly 20 percent saying they would not care “At all.” When it comes to societal impact, Apple surpassed Facebook and Microsoft, but fell behind Google and Amazon, in the number of participants who felt the company had a “Very positive” impact on the world.
Apple appears to have been eclipsed by companies that are becoming more deeply embedded in the fabric of everyday life Google controls search, email, web browsing, the world’s most popular mobile operating system, the leading US online video site, and is now producing more than a half-dozen hardware products from phones, laptops, and VR headsets to speakers, routers, and earbuds.
A recent poll from CNBC, titled the “All-America Economic Survey,” found that 64 percent of Americans own an Apple product, evidence that Apple’s ubiquity in consumer hardware remains undeniable.
Apple has also had a meandering path since smartphones began dominating the computing landscape, leading to accusations that the company has run out of ideas.
That’s where the tech industry is headed, and Apple may find that fewer and fewer consumers care all that much about the best new phone, tablet, or laptop when the most exciting advances in technology are happening elsewhere.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is What Really Happens When Amazon Comes to Your Town”

In their view, any downsides from HQ2 will pale against the upsides-the six-figure salaries and the $5 billion campus, of course, but more than that, the legendary Amazon power to transform a city, as it has Seattle, into a “Knowledge capital.”
That’s because they don’t fully appreciate how much of Seattle’s Amazon miracle was due, not to Bezos or Amazon or even the knowledge economy, but to Seattle’s own very particular mix of economic, cultural and environmental ingredients.
When outsiders gaze covetously at Seattle’s Amazon boom, what they’re really seeing isn’t the effect of a single company, but of a chain reaction.
In other words, long before Amazon was even a business plan, Seattle had developed what urban geographer Heike Mayer calls the “Entrepreneurial ecology”-a potent mix of talent, institutional expertise and networks that startups like Microsoft and later Amazon were able to plug into.
“But the notion that Amazon is going to be your ticket to a glorious future, absent all the other things that a place like Seattle has to offer-that’s delusional.” Put another way, it may be that Seattle was actually the best thing that happened to Amazon.
Most would-be host cities surely know they can’t expect a full repeat of Seattle’s Amazon miracle.
Seattle’s new Amazon headache is simply what happens when a hyper-successful company meets an already popular city.
Even a more conservative Seattle couldn’t have come close to absorbing the 40,000 additional workers Amazon is going to hire for HQ2. More fundamentally-and more relevant for would-be host cities-these “Anti-business” complaints ignore the way Amazon and other tech firms themselves have helped foster Seattle’s disloyalty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The simple formula Jeff Bezos used to turn Amazon into a $480 billion company”

Every day, we make big and small decisions in response to what our environment dictates.
As Jeff Bezos explained to Amazon shareholders in his 2015 letter, there are two categories of decisions.
At Amazon, by distinguishing between impact, they leave all Type 2 decisions to the teams and individuals on the ground, while the people higher up focus on Type 1 decisions.
Most of your time should always be spent on Type 1 decisions.
Type 2 decisions should either be delegated, or they should be batched together with other less critical choices for later.
For most Type 2 decisions, proxies are helpful, but when it comes to the high-impact Type 1 decisions, it’s better to reason from the ground up, taking into account each unique situation.
For most decisions, after a certain point, information and time provide diminishing returns.
Decisions shape every part of our life, and the quality of our decisions determine where we end up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What I Learned From Reading Every Amazon Shareholders Letter”

In turn this strategy attracts more customers to Amazon who spends more in the Amazon ecosystem over time and increases the long-term value of the company.
3/ Jeff doesn’t do math like mere mortals, because It’s ALWAYS Day 1.Jeff invariably ends each year’s annual letter to shareholders by attaching a copy of Amazon’s original 1997 letter with the sign off that it’s “Still Day 1”.To Jeff, being a Day 2 company means decline and death.
Amazon has had just a handful of those - AWS, Alexa, Prime - that’s paid for every experiment.
Paradoxically, Amazon can both have the best customer service while lowering prices because the underlying technology it sits on top of is improving at the rate of Moore’s Law.By using technology to transform customer service into a fixed expense, Amazon can simultaneous drive customer experience and lower prices.
In 2014, Jeff clearly articulated the other flywheel that Amazon has developed over the years - the holy trinity of Fulfillment by Amazon, Marketplace, and Prime.
8/ Do things that don’t scaledrive the ChevyWhen Amazon was just starting, Jeff drove packages to the post office every evening in his Chevy Blazer.
I read all 20 of his letters since Amazon went public and in the end, it all feels as if it was a single letter Jeff wrote in one setting, which is the way it should be.
The consistency in which Amazon has executed, even if meant Jeff had to drive his Chevy Blazer to the post office, has allowed it to endure beyond almost all of the Dotcom era companies and will surely propel Amazon into the future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “eBay Is Playing Catchup, But Will It Work?”

EBay has become a haven for flipping, a practice in which users sell in-demand merchandise at exponentially higher prices, further adding to eBay’s sometimes-dubious reputation.
The goal, as eBay’s vice president of merchandising Jay Hanson puts it, is to get customers to think of eBay as the first shopping site they should visit, no matter what they’re looking to buy.
Omidyar had changed the name of the site from AuctionWeb to eBay, and the site was hosting nearly 800,000 auctions a day, with traffic skyrocketing thanks in part to an AOL partnership that placed eBay on its homepage.
Amazon earned more than triple eBay’s revenue as it continued to invest in pricey and popular inventory like electronics, something Time magazine recognized when it put Bezos on its cover as Person of the Year in 1999 and relegated eBay to the inside of the magazine.
eBay CEO Devin Wenig, who was not made available for this story, told investors in a call this winter that eBay has created 180 million landing pages using this new method of organizing eBay’s data.
It’s unclear if those pages are helping eBay with customer acquisition – especially when it comes to the younger demographic its marketing campaign is aiming to entice – but Wenig said they’ve helped lower eBay’s bounce rate.
Earlier this summer, eBay also added a visual search tool, in which shoppers can snap photos of things they see out in the world or upload a photo they found online to the site, and find the item or something close to it on eBay.
Now eBay is talking with several high-end fashion companies about having them selling directly on eBay too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The businesses Amazon is most likely to struggle to take over”

Amazon began to build its business empire by taking on the book industry and, over the last two decades, has expanded to e-commerce, shipping, logistics, cloud storage, and voice-enabled personal assistants.
Meal-kit company Blue Apron convulsed in July when Amazon registered a US trademark for its own “Prepared food kits.” Groceries are nervously eyeing its recent $13.4 billion purchase of Whole Foods.
There are still some businesses Amazon will find difficult to disrupt.
Last month, Morgan Stanley Research surveyed investors at its “Amazon Disruption Symposium,” asking which consumer sectors the survey-takers thought would take the longest for Amazon to “Materially disrupt.” The most popular choice was dollar stores.
Amazon offers a world of consumer goods in two days or less through its Prime membership, but that still requires an initial purchase of $99. The typical dollar-store customer spends less than $10 in a single trip.
Amazon attempted to break into home improvement in late 2014 with Amazon Local Services, a marketplace for contracting service professionals like plumbers and electricians.
Amazon renamed the platform Amazon Home Services the following year and launched it more broadly, with normal handyman offerings plus oddities like goat grazing and singing performances.
If Amazon can break into sportswear-something most people like to try on-why not home furnishings too?

The orginal article.