Summary of “Carmelo Anthony’s Failed OKC Experiment”

Carmelo Anthony was bad in the playoff series that ended his first season on the Thunder.
The Nuggets hadn’t made the playoffs for eight years prior to Anthony’s arrival in 2003; with Carmelo on the roster, they immediately began a seven-year playoff streak.
In Oklahoma City’s first-round loss to the Jazz, Anthony was “Bad” in the same way that an unexplained wad of human hair in a fast-food meal is bad. When Anthony was off the court, the Thunder stood a chance-in fact, OKC outscored the Jazz by 32 combined points in the series when Anthony was benched.
We’re left frustrated because the things Carmelo wants are still different from the things we want from Carmelo.
On two stages, Carmelo has proved himself as one of the most important players in basketball.
Ah, yes, Olympic Melo: Playing as a power forward or even a center, Carmelo feasted against international big men who had to choose between guarding his shot or his drive.
We’ll never see a player like Carmelo Anthony again.
Did Carmelo play poorly this season because he hated his non-star turn? Or did Carmelo hate this season because he played poorly? Carmelo’s chickens and eggs will sum up his NBA career: Maybe he was “Bad” as a result of his poor decisions and misguided priorities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Oklahoma City Thunder star Carmelo Anthony is learning to accept a new role”

Through training camp and the first six weeks of the season, that was the unofficial mantra of the Oklahoma City Thunder, or at least its three headliners, Russell Westbrook, Paul George and Anthony.
After the Thunder lost to the Cavs on Feb. 13, amid the forced quiet of the locker room, Anthony walked from the shower to his locker carrying his phone.
“I’ve been on teams with bad guys,” says Thunder backup point guard Raymond Felton, who played with Anthony in New York.
Sept. 22, three days before the start of training camp, Anthony got a call asking if he would be willing to add the Thunder to his list of approved teams if a deal could get done.
Hundreds of them showed up at the airport to greet Anthony when he arrived from New York after the trade.
“In New York, there was so much going on with the organization and the city,” Anthony says.
Never in his career – not in his eight years in Denver nor his seven in New York – had Anthony been open to the idea of reducing or even altering his role.
Without saying the words, he said he would make every effort to bring Olympic Melo to OKC. The next day, Anthony called Westbrook and George together and told them the new plan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Inescapable Pull of Carmelo Anthony”

“I’m a very random person,” Carmelo Anthony told Sports Illustrated in a video interview before this season, sounding like a man reading the About Me section of his online dating profile out loud.
The negotiations were comical: Denver kept upping the price for Anthony, a pending free agent, and the Knicks kept acquiescing, fearing that if they didn’t he’d wind up a Brooklyn Net instead. And so, instead of waiting for the offseason when they could acquire him for straight-up cash, New York dealt a large portion of their roster, guys who could have either played alongside Anthony or at least been used as trade bait in a future additive deal.
Anthony turned in a classic Mike Breen “BANG!” performance on Easter Sunday in 2012 against the Bulls that made the Garden feel like old times in the ’90s, and two seasons later, he finished a game with 62 points.
In a few weeks span in December 2016, he engaged in public sniping with Knicks president Jackson and then was the subject of some remarks in a memoir by former Nuggets coach George Karl, who called him “a user of people” and explained that Anthony “Carried two big burdens: all that money and no father to show [him] how to act like a man.”
When Anthony left New York, he posted a rambling, sporadically capitalized, heartfelt goodbye message on his website that included the phrases “Survive within the belly of the beast,” “LOVE HAS NO BARRIERS,” “I came to NYC to B Born again,” “BOOK of WONDERMENTS,” and “I’m choosing to swim. ‘Till the very end. No matter how much the seas around me may rage.” During Oklahoma City’s media day, when a reporter asked what he thought about possibly coming off the bench as part of a loaded Thunder team that picked up both him and Paul George in the offseason, Anthony got as miffed and snarky as I’d ever seen him.
The night before the Thunder played in New York, they won in triple-OT in Philadelphia, and after the game Anthony was asked what kind of reception he expected at the Garden.
“It’s not like I was there a season or two seasons. I spent a lot of time there-almost seven years. It was great times, bad times. Regardless, I stuck with it. I always remained professional. I came and did my job whether they liked it or not. Hopefully they recognize that.” During lineup announcements, the Knicks played a Melo tribute video, to mostly cheers but a smattering of boos, as Anthony, in his hoodie, looked on.
The story of the game quickly ran away from Anthony, who finished with 12 points as the Knicks’ Michael Beasley dropped 30 and New York, playing without Porzingis and Tim Hardaway Jr., defeated the Thunder 111-96.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NBA: Inside the implosion that rebuilt the New York Knicks”

Shortly after the New York Knicks hired Jackson as president, Anthony said he was willing to do anything Jackson asked if it led to building a winner in New York.
Bizarre public criticisms, organizational politics, an erosion of trust – it all played a role in the ugly end for Anthony and Jackson in New York.
We spoke to coaches, executives and agents familiar with the Knicks during Jackson’s and Anthony’s tenure for a behind-the-scenes look at how things imploded between the two in their final season together.
Most people around the Knicks felt that the beginning of the end of Jackson and Anthony’s relationship came in early December 2016.
About two weeks after Jackson mentioned Anthony’s penchant for holding on to the ball, the Knicks returned home.
Anthony said he was at peace with his uncertain situation, though he was still set on escaping New York, according to people familiar with his thinking.
Anthony was stuck in New York until new president Steve Mills and general manager Scott Perry moved him to Oklahoma City shortly before training camp.11.
Some had surmised that Anthony was preventing Porzingis and the Knicks from playing the way they have early in the season: with solid ball and player movement and an honest effort on defense.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony Makes The Thunder Whole”

At first glance, Sam Presti and the Thunder pulling off yet another surprising trade – this time swapping Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott and a second-round pick for 10-time All-Star Carmelo Anthony – seems like fool’s gold.
There’s only one ball, and Anthony, Paul George and reigning MVP Russell Westbrook all used prolific amounts of it last season: Anthony had a usage rate of 29.1 percent, his lowest in a decade but still a top-20 figure in the league.
Anthony isn’t what he once was and his Knicks haven’t made the playoffs since 2013; George’s Indiana Pacers and Westbrook’s Thunder washed out in the first round.
Unlike most teams adding star players to a modest roster, there’s a template in the team’s recent history for how the fit might go: The Kevin Durant-led 2015-16 Thunder went up 3-1 on the Golden State Warriors in the conference finals.
Anthony had an effective field goal rate of 58.6 percent on catch-and-shoot jumpers last season, better than known sharpshooters like Kevin Love and in the top half of players with at least 200 attempts.
The Thunder didn’t just address their need for shooters – they course-corrected their recent tendency to address shooting deficiencies with players who can only shoot, Anthony Morrow or Alex Abrines.
The Thunder rotation was already perilously thin, and trading Kanter and McDermott for Anthony replaces two young players with a 33-year-old forward.
So the fact that Anthony and George carried their respective offenses with fairly limited rosters should mean that Roberson, Grant and other role players can focus on their strengths rather than their deficiencies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony’s messy, painful and complicated legacy with the New York Knicks”

The message was designed to give hope to a Knicks team in the opening stages of a free fall, but the words take on a new meaning now for Carmelo Anthony as he heads to the Oklahoma City Thunder for Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott and a 2018 second-rounder.
In many ways, Anthony’s legacy as a Knick can be summed up in the same way you’d describe these two trades: extremely complicated.
Early in the 2014-15 season – a few months after Anthony signed a $124 million deal to remain with the New York Knicks – he was already having second thoughts about his decision.
Others will hang on to the idea that Anthony never had a chance to truly succeed in New York because of the Knicks’ perpetual roster and coaching instability.
If you want to start a fun argument among Knicks fans, ask them who Anthony’s most talented Knicks teammate was.
Several top members of Knicks management told associates that they felt they couldn’t win with Anthony and that his habits would negatively affect Porzingis and the other young Knicks, according to sources.
Still, Anthony kept coming back to the idea of starting over in a new city and with a new team – a feeling that ultimately won out.
Anthony felt plenty of pain amid all of the losing over the past three seasons in New York.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Team USA Melo Finally Gets His Chance in the NBA”

As Kristaps Porzingis becomes the primary option in New York, Melo will become the third option for the first time.
Melo has logged a usage rate over 28 in each of his 14 seasons in the league.
Melo has Kobe DNA; he’s inclined to stop the ball, dribble, dribble, dribble, and then shoot.
The best basketball of Carmelo’s career has come as a secondary option for USA Basketball or when he’s shared the floor with a quality NBA point guard.
The difference is that now Melo will be spacing the floor.
None of his Westbrook’s teammates could make plays off the bounce like Melo and George can.
Thunder coach Billy Donovan isn’t going to just have Melo standing in the corner, though.
Westbrook frequently runs the pick-and-roll, but the team lacked a reliable threat who could pop for 3s. In the past Anthony was reluctant to play power forward, but the hope is that Donovan can convince him that it’s for the best.

The orginal article.