Summary of “Facebook knew about Snap’s struggles months before the public”

This isn’t the first time Facebook has used Onavo’s app usage data to make major decisions.
The info reportedly influenced the decision to buy WhatsApp, as Facebook knew that WhatsApp’s dominance in some areas could cut it out of the loop.
To be clear, Facebook isn’t grabbing this data behind anyone’s back.
The revelation here is more about how Facebook uses that information rather than the collection itself.
Former Federal Trade Commission CTO Askhan Soltani tells the WSJ that Facebook is turning customers’ own data against them by using it to snuff out competitors.
Tech lawyer Adam Shevell is concerned that Facebook might be violating Apple’s App Store rules by collecting data that isn’t directly relevant to app use or ads.
No matter what, the news underscores just how hard it is for upstarts to challenge Facebook’s dominant position.
How do you compete with an internet giant that can counter your app’s features the moment it becomes popular? This doesn’t make Facebook immune to competition, but app makers definitely can’t assume that they’ll catch the firm off-guard.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Big brother is here, and his name is Facebook”

Rather, our loss of privacy and Big Brother’s influence on us are brought about by none other than our penchant for sharing on social media.
Did you know that the social network may have the capability to listen in even when we are not actively sharing information or using the mobile app?
Given the amount of permissions we give social networks when we install apps on our mobile devices, we might as well just hand them over privileged access to our personal lives.
You can easily access the social network through your mobile web browser and set it to “Desktop mode”.
You can leave Facebook in favor of other social networking services.
What exactly can we look forward to in social networking, when Facebook seems to be the apex of social networking apps today?
Perhaps decentralization is key to ensuring a secure social network built for the long run.
Nexus is actually launching its initial coin offering, which aims to raise resources and give users the chance to own a part of the social network through cryptographic tokens.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can an App Make You a Better Runner?”

Their promise was that I would become a better, more efficient runner; I would have hard data that went far beyond the capabilities of a lowly stopwatch and a gut feeling of improvement.
Like any worthwhile hobby in 2017, running is the focus of a variety of apps that can help you refine the experience.
The app can be used to race other users or virtually “Run” with them, which just means running the same distance and comparing stats.
The other major user trend also feels uncomfortably familiar: “Everyone talks badly about themselves as a runner; they always knock themselves down a couple pegs. They’re always like ‘Oh, I’m not a serious runner,’ and then you go look at their history and they run 20 miles a week,” Clark says.
Runkeeper remains my app of choice for various reasons, but it has the same objective as Nike+ Run Club and Strava and all the rest: gamifying something that is otherwise done alone.
For the rest of the run, I just thought of ways to describe the pain: It felt like my knee had been hollowed out, and that at any second the bones surrounded by what used to be tissue and muscle would shatter into pieces.
I’d run like this for 10 miles, sacrificing comfort - and likely, speed! - so I would have better stats on my phone.
Cofounder Olivier Bernhard created the shoes with the help of a Swiss engineer; their goal was to re-create the feeling of running on clay tennis courts - a certain bounce to your step and cushion to your fall.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple and the Oak Tree – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

1 By the spring of 2003 Apple had introduced the iTunes Music Store, a seamless and legal way to download DRM-protected digital music,2 but particularly in those early days the value of the iTunes Music Store to Apple was not so much that it was a selling point to consumers, but rather a means by which Apple could play dumb about how it was that its burgeoning number of iPod customers came to fill up their music libraries.
To be clear, I’m not very bent out of shape about this; the reality is that piracy was happening before Apple woke up to the music revolution, and would have continued whether the iPod came along or not.3 In fact, by offering a legal alternative that not only matched but exceeded the convenience of piracy, Apple pointed the way to a surprisingly bright future for the music labels.
What is worth noting is that Apple’s breakthrough product – the one that started Apple down the road to the iPhone, iPad, App Store, everything that contributed to yesterday’s financial results – was not simply a product of Steve Jobs vision, or Rubinstein or Tony Fadell or Jony Ive or any of the other folks at Apple.
Apple’s preference, of course, is that you stream via Apple Music, one of the key parts of Apple’s Services businesses; the “Services” line on Apple’s income statement is now the second-largest, and has loomed largest in Apple’s quarterly presentation to analysts for the last year-and-a-half.
Later that year Apple would release the iPhone 6 and reap the rewards of that advantage: Greater China quickly became Apple’s second-largest market, buying an incredible $59 billion worth of Apple products in the company’s 2015 fiscal year.4 Naturally, despite the fact Apple’s China sales have faltered with the iPhone’s increasingly stale design, services revenue has only grown; according to App Annie, App Store revenue in China surpassed App Store revenue in the United States last fall, making China the most important market for Apple’s fastest growing segment.
Tim Cook argued on Apple’s earnings call – correctly and fairly, to be sure – that in the case of removing VPN apps the company is simply following the law; of course there is no law that says Apple, contrary to the company’s behavior in other countries or markets, ought to invest $1 billion in a Chinese company competing with a Western challenger, or open R&D facilities worth $500 million when the company has been reticent for years to let technology-focused employees work in San Francisco, much less across the Pacific.
5 As for the HomePod, Cook highlighted on the earnings call that it is “Designed to work with your Apple Music subscription”; if you have a Spotify subscription and want voice control, you will have to get an Echo instead. Indeed, Apple’s attempt at services lock-in is steadily increasing: HomePod supports only Apple Music and Siri, CarPlay supports only Siri and Apple Maps, iOS still doesn’t let one change default applications.
What has always made the “Apple is doomed” argument so dumb is that it has always implied that Apple was some sort of special snowflake, incapable of leveraging its massive user base or demonstrated ability to iterate on its industry-leading products.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Algorithm That Makes Preschoolers Obsessed With YouTube Kids”

If you don’t have a 3-year-old in your life, you may not be aware of YouTube Kids, an app that’s essentially a stripped-down version of the original video blogging site, with videos filtered by the target audience’s age.
“Daddy Finger” is basically the YouTube Kids anthem, and ChuChu TV’s dynamic interpretations of popular kid songs are inescapable.
In the mobile internet age, the same millennials who have ditched cable television en masse are now having babies, which makes apps like YouTube Kids the screentime option du jour.
Which is part of why kids using apps like YouTube Kids often select videos that portray familiar concepts-ones that feature a cartoon character or topic they’re already drawn to.
YouTube Kids last year featured a video that showed Mickey Mouse-esque characters shooting one another in the head with guns, Today reported.
At the same time, the creators of YouTube Kids videos spend countless hours trying to game the algorithm so that their videos are viewed as many times as possible-more views translate into more advertising dollars for them.
Unlike YouTube’s main website, YouTube Kids does not use an individual child’s geographic location, gender, or age to make recommendations, a spokesperson told me.
The YouTube spokeswoman cited the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule, a Federal Trade Commission requirement for operators of websites aimed at kids under 13 years old, but declined to answer repeated questions about why the YouTube Kids algorithm used different inputs than the original site’s algorithm.

The orginal article.

Summary of “27 Must-Have Apps You Don’t Know About”

Have you ever wondered what products or apps you’re missing out on? It’s easy to find the most popular ones in a particular category-but what about the hidden gems? One of Product Hunt’s community members David Spinks has the same question.
He asked other users: What’s one app you use a lot that most people don’t know about?
The community responded with over 220 product recommendations.
Here are 27 of our favorites-from a plug-in that helps you write better, to a Mac volume booster, to an automated website that tracks just about everything in your life.
Read on for morebut be ready to go down an app blackhole for the next few hours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Create Your Own Apps? Apple Will Teach You How to Code-for Free”

Maybe you have a cool app in mind that you would like to develop, but you don’t know whom to hire to code it, much less have the money.
No problem: For DIY types of people, Apple has released a free app development curriculum in the iBooks Store.
While the curriculum is designed for high school and community college students – and select schools will start offering the curriculum this fall – you don’t have to attend school to learn to code in Swift, Apple’s programming language.
In case you aren’t aware, you can also learn to code with Swift using Swift Playgrounds.
Granted, downloading a set of textbooks and teacher guides isn’t the same as taking classes; then again, for many people self-paced learning is the best kind of learning.
You can learn to code whenever you have time, not on someone else’s schedule.
The app economy is already huge, and the automation economy – and the need for the ability to, if not program, at least understand the technology and issues underlying automation programming – will grow exponentially in the years to come.
Plenty of people already do: According to Apple, Swift Playgrounds has been downloaded more than one million times, and the add-on “Everyone Can Code” has been downloaded nearly half a million times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “27 Must-Have Apps You Don’t Know About”

Have you ever wondered what products or apps you’re missing out on? It’s easy to find the most popular ones in a particular category-but what about the hidden gems? One of Product Hunt’s community members David Spinks has the same question.
He asked other users: What’s one app you use a lot that most people don’t know about?
The community responded with over 220 product recommendations.
Here are 27 of our favorites-from a plug-in that helps you write better, to a Mac volume booster, to an automated website that tracks just about everything in your life.
Read on for morebut be ready to go down an app blackhole for the next few hours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The iPhone killed my inner nerd”

All of those tower PCs are now inside my pocket, thanks to the iPhone.
The original iPhone was locked to O2 in the UK and AT&T in the US, but a hack quickly allowed you to run the phone on any carrier network.
Once the iPhone 3G arrived, I switched fully over because of the App Store.
Apple’s App Store and the iPhone have altered computing massively, beyond my own examples.
Nokia, BlackBerry, Microsoft, Motorola, and Palm have all had their businesses disrupted by the iPhone.
Apple’s iPhone has been on the market for 10 years now, and it hasn’t experienced a single instance of a mass malware attack like we’ve seen twice in the past month on Windows PCs. Apple’s iPhone model has succeeded for apps and security Apple’s locked down and sandboxed environment for apps is a new model that has succeeded with consumers and security.
Sure, there have been vulnerabilities, bugs, and near misses, but nobody has been forced to pay $300 to unlock their iPhone after a huge malware attack.
Windows 8, Chromebooks, and Android all probably wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for the iPhone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s AR is closer to reality than Google’s”

Next up on Apple’s agenda is augmented reality, the act of superimposing digital data and visuals atop a live video feed of your surroundings – something that Google, Microsoft, and many others have been experimenting with for a long time.
Apple is far from being able to claim it invented AR, but its new ARKit in iOS 11 is already showing signs to suggest that Apple will help bring AR into the mainstream faster and better than anyone else.
Apple’s AR will immediately reach millions of people who already have the requisite hardware.
Google’s Tango is about the future whereas Apple’s ARKit is about the present.
Considering how little time it took to develop two convincingly accurate AR measuring apps with the iOS 11 beta, and reading the comments from their makers, Apple also appears to have an advantage in the ease of development with ARKit.
It’s exciting to think that there are still three months before the release of the next iPhone and the accompanying finalization of iOS 11, by which time Apple’s big-budget app developer partners are likely to have a deluge of AR-enabled apps for people to play with.
Apple’s iPhone is more convenient than Google’s Project Tango devices and with iOS 11 it’ll have much better AR capabilities than its nearest premium Android rivals.
So if we’re looking for the AR innovator that will take the technology into the mainstream, Apple once again looks like the likeliest suspect.

The orginal article.