Summary of “Waze and Google Maps Create Traffic in Cities”

In 2001, the city designated the street as Berkeley’s first “Bicycle boulevard,” presumably due to some combination of it being relatively free of traffic and its offer of a direct route from the UC Berkeley campus down into Oakland.
It’s not only annoying as hell, it’s a scenario ripe for accidents; among the top causes of accidents are driver distraction, unfamiliarity with the street, and an increase in overall traffic.
The two ride-sharing titans have each designed their own mapping apps – Lyft Navigation and Uber Driver – but Navigation was built using Google Maps, and Uber’s app has yet to be fully rolled out.
If cities thwart map apps and ride-share services through infrastructure changes with the intent to slow traffic down, it has the effect of slowing down traffic.
The algorithm may tell drivers to go down another side street, and the residents who’ve been griping to the mayor may be pleased, but traffic, on the city whole, has been negatively affected, making everyone’s travel longer than before.
If a grocery chain wants to build a supermarket, the city calculates how much extra traffic is expected, and imposes an “Impact fee” for the strain caused by the extra traffic on public thoroughfares.
In the odd case of map apps and ride-shares, who gets the fee? The “Disruptive” apps? The ride-share services physically clogging the streets? The users, the state, the cities themselves? Are a bunch of class-action lawsuits – like the one directed at Waze from an Israeli suburb – the future?
“If you make an app where some of the users’ travel time is 20 percent higher than it was before, to improve overall traffic by diverting flow, for the greater good of society,” says Bayen, “The first thing you’d do is delete it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The App That Reminds You You’re Going to Die”

For the past three months, an app called WeCroak has been telling me I’m going to die.
“You can become a master of this powerful device rather than a slave to it,” says Michael Acton Smith, a co-founder of Calm, an app that offers guided meditation and soothing soundtracks and has surpassed 14 million downloads.
Headspace, a rival app that provides meditation sessions led by a former Buddhist monk, has been downloaded more than 18 million times.
There are apps to improve your breathing; apps that track the time you spend on other apps; and apps to teach you to be mindful while running, eating, giving birth, browsing the web, or, per the Buddhify app, “Waiting around.” I decided to test whether technology could be both malady and cure.
WeCroak is the very real passion project of Ian Thomas, a 27-year-old freelance app developer, and Hansa Bergwall, a 35-year-old publicist, who met through Airbnb.
Six weeks later, on July 26, WeCroak debuted on Apple’s App Store.
With each day the app sounds less like a Hobbesian warning-“Life is short”-and more like an Oprah-esque affirmation: “Life’s too short!”.
Calm emails me every few days to say, for example, “Christi from Calm” is “Here to support you on your mindfulness journey”-a tactic, called an “External trigger,” meant to nudge users back to the app.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Snapchat boss Evan Spiegel on the app that made him one of the world’s youngest billionaires”

As the 27-year-old founder and chief executive of Snap Inc – née Snapchat, after the company’s main product – references Damien Hirst’s latest exhibition in Venice, Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable, it becomes clear that Spiegel isn’t like other founders.
Snapchat was initially best known for its disappearing messages, gaining it a reputation as the “Sexting” app.
Brown received a $158m settlement in 2014 and Spiegel said at the time that “We acknowledge Reggie’s contribution to the creation of Snapchat and appreciate his work in getting the application off the ground”.
Snapchat rebuffed the offer, sparking a cold war between the companies that has continued to this day, with Facebook releasing multiple Snapchat clones and making similar features for its own apps.
When we meet, in one of Snap’s two London offices, Spiegel has just revealed a major redesign of Snapchat, prompted in part by its shaky first nine months as a public company.
There they sit above Snapchat Discover, the app’s news section, which contains Stories from professional publishers, as well as original content created by Snapchat users and curated by the company.
Some of this lofty rhetoric can be a bit odd when juxtaposed with the lighthearted lifestyle content that makes up the majority of published stories on Snapchat, but Spiegel insists that those who want hard news do find it.
“You can think of the new version of Snapchat Discover like a giant newsstand that has been organised just for you based on what you’re interested in.” With only vetted news organisations able to publish on Snapchat, and without a filter bubble, the hope is that Snapchat can avoid “Fake news” and find a way out of it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is a Trivia App the Answer to Questions About Live Streaming?”

It’s easy to feel that a strange new future has arrived upon opening the free app for the first time.
Players use their touch screens to respond in less than 10 seconds, and the app shows how many people are eliminated after each round.
At least 20,000 people were unable to identify the correct spelling of “Embarrassed.” But the app tests a range of knowledge: Carson Daly, the former MTV host, posted on Instagram that he was excited to be an option for “Who co-hosted the first season of American Idol with Ryan Seacrest in 2002?”.Early questions tend to be on the easier side, like: “Which president is featured on the U.S. one dollar bill?” Those who answer all the questions correctly share in a prize that has fluctuated between hundreds and thousands of dollars and is distributed via PayPal.
Greg Swan Nov. 15, 2017 Mr. Kroll, a Twitch fan, said that much of what people knew as live video from apps like Twitter’s Periscope lacked a sense of urgency and participation.
“We schedule our lives, but the apps on our phones have been designed to make content available anytime, anywhere,” Mr. Yusupov said.
Mr. Kroll added that HQ’s schedule was inspiring people to play with co-workers in the afternoon and again with family and friends in the evening, making it more akin to a broadcast TV program.
Could it ultimately serve as a blueprint for bigger tech companies that have been looking for ways to drum up interest in live video content? Mr. Kroll and Mr. Yusupov were hesitant to share details around how they produce the show and what, if any, parts of HQ could be patented.
The men said that HQ had been approached by a bevy of ad agencies and chief marketing officers but that they were still determining how sponsorships could be worked into the app.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Do Apps That Cut Blue Light Help You Sleep?”

Do Apps That Cut Blue Light Help You Sleep? : Shots – Health News Lots of phone and tablet apps promise to improve sleep by filtering out the blue light from device screens.
If you’re losing sleep over the blue light coming from your phone, there’s an app for that.
There are now lots of apps that promise to improve sleep by filtering out the blue light produced by phones, tablets, computers and even televisions.
Every iPhone comes with an app called Night Shift that lets you filter out blue light.
Without a filtering app, cellphones and tablets expose users to an alarming amount of blue light, she says, “Especially as people are lying in bed and have their screens just a few inches from their face.”
In the study, 21 people put on special glasses after sunset each day to filter out blue light.
Like Ostrin, Zoltowski studies blue light and sleep.
Zoltowski says people need to remember that devices are just one source of blue light.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple is sharing your face with apps. That’s a new privacy worry.”

Apple just started sharing your face with lots of apps.
I also think Apple rushed into sharing face maps with app makers that may not share its commitment, and it isn’t being paranoid enough about the minefield it just entered.
Apple’s rules say developers can’t sell face data, use it to identify anonymous people or use it for advertising.
The MeasureKit app’s maker told me he wasn’t sensing much extra scrutiny from Apple for accessing face data.
Apps are supposed to make clear why they’re accessing your face and seek “Conspicuous consent,” according to Apple’s policies.
Overwhelming people with notifications and choices is a concern, but the face seems like a sufficiently new and sensitive data source that it warrants special permission.
Facial detection can, of course, be used for good and for bad. Warby Parker, the online glasses purveyor, uses it to fit frames to faces, and a Snapchat demo uses it to virtually paint on your face.
What keeps privacy advocates up at night is that the iPhone X will make face scanning seem normal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If Portugal is a net neutrality nightmare, we’re already living in it”

A few weeks ago, as it seemed more and more likely that FCC chairman Ajit Pai would successfully dismantle US net neutrality rules, California Congressional representative Ro Khanna tweeted an alarming-looking screenshot from Portuguese mobile carrier Meo.
“In Portugal, with no net neutrality, internet providers are starting to split the net into packages,” he wrote.
As Techdirt pointed out, it looks remarkably similar to a satirical chart showing internet services split into cable-style bundles, a graphic that’s been used to drive home the importance of net neutrality for years.
For one thing, Portugal is part of the EU, which published widely praised net neutrality rules last year.
General EU regulations call to examine cases on an individual basis, rather than banning the practice altogether, and so do the United States’ current net neutrality rules.
I haven’t seen a convincing argument that they’re a unique consequence of Portugal flouting EU net neutrality rules, nor something that seems unfathomable under the existing American system.
The biggest roadblock to US carriers adopting them is probably more public opinion than the FCC. If there’s a lesson here, it’s that net neutrality isn’t just about writing rules, but about making sure that agencies will meaningfully enforce the spirit of them.
The FCC, for example, determined in January that AT&T and Verizon’s zero-rating plans did violate net neutrality rules, though T-Mobile’s didn’t.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to turn your iPad into the best digital photo frame”

You can easily spend between $100 and $200 on a Wi-Fi digital photo frame, but these often have clunky interfaces for syncing photos and the displays can be quite poor.
A better solution may be repurposing an old iPad or putting your current iPad in photo frame mode for special occasions.
While I’d love to see this feature return in the future, it’s possible to create a Wi-Fi digital photo frame mode for your iPad using built-in features in iOS today.
My setup uses the 2016 9.7-inch iPad Pro running the latest version of iOS 11, but this guide should work with any modern iPad running a recent version of iOS. Follow these steps and you can update your wireless digital photo frame easily from your iPhone or Mac too.
You can optionally invite other iCloud users if you want others to add their photos to the photo frame slideshow, then tap Create and your new album is ready for adding photos.
Add photos to your new shared album from your iPhone, iPad, or Mac using the same iCloud account with iCloud Photo Sharing enabled from the Photos app.
For digital photo frame mode, I disable all hardware buttons and touch and do not use a time limit.
Turning your iPad into a Wi-Fi digital photo frame is a great way to give an old iPad new purpose, and following these steps to turn your main iPad into a photo frame temporarily can be a nice party trick too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘We’re designing minds’: Industry insider reveals secrets of addictive app trade”

The average Canadian teenager is on track to spend nearly a decade of their life staring at a smartphone, and that’s no accident, according to an industry insider who shared some time-sucking secrets of the app design trade.
Named after the brain molecule that gives us pleasure, Dopamine Labs uses computer coding to influence behaviour – most importantly, to compel people to spend more time with an app and to keep coming back for more.
To make a profit, companies “Need your eyeballs locked in that app as long as humanly possible,” he says.
A push notification, such as a message that someone has commented on your Facebook photo, is a trigger; opening the app is the action; and the reward could be a “Like” or a “Share” of a message you posted.
Emily, a teen from Guelph, Ont., tracked her cellphone use this summer with an app called Moment.
Emily, a 16-year-old from Guelph, Ont., who agreed to track her smartphone use for Marketplace this past summer using an app called Moment, has a Snapchat score of 1.2 million – several hundred thousand points ahead of her friends.
The streak feature is a technique known as a loss aversion, which often involves trying to keep users fixated on an app even when it’s not useful or they don’t enjoy it anymore.
Emily’s tracking app revealed she uses her phone an average of three hours and 35 minutes a day, with most of that time spent on Snapchat.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Google’s Physical Keys Will Protect Your Password”

The physical keys are an evolution of two-factor authentication, an extra security layer to ensure that your password is being entered by you.
To get started, you will have to buy two physical keys for about $20 each.
Mr. Sabin, the former N.S.A. hacker, who is now a director of network security at GRA Quantum, a security consulting firm, said the physical keys had pros and cons.
On the other hand, if you lose the keys or don’t have the keys around when you need to log in to a new device, it takes longer to regain access to your account.
Ms. Sandvik, who has been testing Google’s program to assess whether to recommend it to the newsroom, said she had not yet discovered vulnerabilities in the security key system outside of the slim possibility that a hacker gained possession of both your password and your key.
The Bottom LineWhile the security keys are easy to set up and provide tough security, they may be disruptive to your productivity if you rely on apps that are incompatible with the keys.
Another example of how the keys can stifle productivity: Many employers still require using the Microsoft Outlook app for email, which won’t work with the keys.
The question is how long it will take security researchers to find a way to hack the physical keys as well.

The orginal article.