Summary of “27 Must-Have Apps You Don’t Know About”

Have you ever wondered what products or apps you’re missing out on? It’s easy to find the most popular ones in a particular category-but what about the hidden gems? One of Product Hunt’s community members David Spinks has the same question.
He asked other users: What’s one app you use a lot that most people don’t know about?
The community responded with over 220 product recommendations.
Here are 27 of our favorites-from a plug-in that helps you write better, to a Mac volume booster, to an automated website that tracks just about everything in your life.
Read on for morebut be ready to go down an app blackhole for the next few hours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Create Your Own Apps? Apple Will Teach You How to Code-for Free”

Maybe you have a cool app in mind that you would like to develop, but you don’t know whom to hire to code it, much less have the money.
No problem: For DIY types of people, Apple has released a free app development curriculum in the iBooks Store.
While the curriculum is designed for high school and community college students – and select schools will start offering the curriculum this fall – you don’t have to attend school to learn to code in Swift, Apple’s programming language.
In case you aren’t aware, you can also learn to code with Swift using Swift Playgrounds.
Granted, downloading a set of textbooks and teacher guides isn’t the same as taking classes; then again, for many people self-paced learning is the best kind of learning.
You can learn to code whenever you have time, not on someone else’s schedule.
The app economy is already huge, and the automation economy – and the need for the ability to, if not program, at least understand the technology and issues underlying automation programming – will grow exponentially in the years to come.
Plenty of people already do: According to Apple, Swift Playgrounds has been downloaded more than one million times, and the add-on “Everyone Can Code” has been downloaded nearly half a million times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “27 Must-Have Apps You Don’t Know About”

Have you ever wondered what products or apps you’re missing out on? It’s easy to find the most popular ones in a particular category-but what about the hidden gems? One of Product Hunt’s community members David Spinks has the same question.
He asked other users: What’s one app you use a lot that most people don’t know about?
The community responded with over 220 product recommendations.
Here are 27 of our favorites-from a plug-in that helps you write better, to a Mac volume booster, to an automated website that tracks just about everything in your life.
Read on for morebut be ready to go down an app blackhole for the next few hours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The iPhone killed my inner nerd”

All of those tower PCs are now inside my pocket, thanks to the iPhone.
The original iPhone was locked to O2 in the UK and AT&T in the US, but a hack quickly allowed you to run the phone on any carrier network.
Once the iPhone 3G arrived, I switched fully over because of the App Store.
Apple’s App Store and the iPhone have altered computing massively, beyond my own examples.
Nokia, BlackBerry, Microsoft, Motorola, and Palm have all had their businesses disrupted by the iPhone.
Apple’s iPhone has been on the market for 10 years now, and it hasn’t experienced a single instance of a mass malware attack like we’ve seen twice in the past month on Windows PCs. Apple’s iPhone model has succeeded for apps and security Apple’s locked down and sandboxed environment for apps is a new model that has succeeded with consumers and security.
Sure, there have been vulnerabilities, bugs, and near misses, but nobody has been forced to pay $300 to unlock their iPhone after a huge malware attack.
Windows 8, Chromebooks, and Android all probably wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for the iPhone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s AR is closer to reality than Google’s”

Next up on Apple’s agenda is augmented reality, the act of superimposing digital data and visuals atop a live video feed of your surroundings – something that Google, Microsoft, and many others have been experimenting with for a long time.
Apple is far from being able to claim it invented AR, but its new ARKit in iOS 11 is already showing signs to suggest that Apple will help bring AR into the mainstream faster and better than anyone else.
Apple’s AR will immediately reach millions of people who already have the requisite hardware.
Google’s Tango is about the future whereas Apple’s ARKit is about the present.
Considering how little time it took to develop two convincingly accurate AR measuring apps with the iOS 11 beta, and reading the comments from their makers, Apple also appears to have an advantage in the ease of development with ARKit.
It’s exciting to think that there are still three months before the release of the next iPhone and the accompanying finalization of iOS 11, by which time Apple’s big-budget app developer partners are likely to have a deluge of AR-enabled apps for people to play with.
Apple’s iPhone is more convenient than Google’s Project Tango devices and with iOS 11 it’ll have much better AR capabilities than its nearest premium Android rivals.
So if we’re looking for the AR innovator that will take the technology into the mainstream, Apple once again looks like the likeliest suspect.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Apple’s iPhone changed the world: 10 years in 10 charts”

Apple’s first iPhone was released 10 years ago this week – on June 29, 2007.
The iPhone put the internet in everyone’s pocket When Steve Jobs first unveiled the iPhone, he described it as a “a revolutionary mobile phone,” a “Widescreen iPod with touch controls” and a “Breakthrough Internet communications device.”
The iPhone transformed photography from a hobby to a part of everyday life Smartphones, along with their attendant photo-editing apps, put good cameras in everybody’s pockets and we all became prolific photographers.
The iPhone App Store changed the way software was created and distributed Apple launched its App Store in 2008 – a year after the iPhone’s launch – with 500 apps.
iPhone apps changed everything, even how people work On-demand work began with the first internet boom in the late 1990s.
The iPhone transformed Apple’s business – and drove massive growth In its 2006 fiscal year, Apple generated $1.9 billion of profit on $19.3 billion of revenue – mostly from the iPod and Mac.
The iPhone made Apple the world’s most valuable company In the years before the iPhone’s launch, Apple was still struggling.
Perhaps more interesting: The many things the iPhone has changed that are a degree or two away, and perhaps difficult to isolate or measure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “iOS 11 preview: keep it simple, smarty”

You still start with a home screen grid of apps and folders, and the visual language that started way back in 2013 with iOS 7 isn’t radically changing either.
Multitasking The App Switcher is entirely new in iOS 11.
The real trick is bringing up a “Slide Over” app, which amounts to a skinny hovering window you can arrange on the left or right on top of either a single app or a split-view app.
It’s internal to the browser app so when you do it you can’t use split view to get another app – though you can bring in a slide over app.
Say you have two apps open in split view: you can drag on an image or some text, drag it over to the other app, and place it.
Files app The last part of the Trifecta of “Computer things” in iOS 11 is the most obvious one: a better way to handle files.
For developers, the App Store, for example, now splits out games and apps, which might help juice the market for real productivity apps on the iPad. It also created a really solid, automatic screen recording feature, which is the very thing I’ve used to make the GIFs in this article.
Keep it simple, smarty When you combine this trifecta of better multitasking, drag and drop, and the Files app, you get much closer to using the iPad like a traditional computer than ever before.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Growth is getting hard from intensive competition, consolidation, and saturation at andrewchen”

The reason for the above is that there are multiple trends – happening right now – that impede growth for new products.
These trends are powerful and critical to understanding why all of a sudden, entrepreneurs/investors are starting to get into many new fields in order to find new opportunities.
The new Google/Apple app duopoly is more concentrated, more closed, and far less rich as compared to web – which means that mobile is far more stagnant and harder to break into.
If you’re introducing a new app – whether unbundling a more complex app or launching a new startup – how do you break into this? There’s not a ton of organic opportunities.
It’s currently at 2 billion users, with 17% YoY user growth, and its ability to add more inventory depends increasing its user base, or increasing users’ time spent on Facebook.
These trends are troubling, and mean that these channels are getting less engagement per user, and we haven’t found amazing new channels to replace them.
At the same time as advertising is getting more crowded, there’s also increasingly widespread availability and adoption of tools like Mixpanel, Leanplum, Optimizely and others that close the gap on being data-driven at companies.
Acquiring a new app user means stealing a user’s time from their favorite existing app.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lessons I’ve Learned from Three Million Downloads”

In January 2011 I was on summer break, but instead of getting a day job, or socializing, I spent a lot of time holed up in my room writing the first version of an iOS app called Class Timetable.
I’d been looking for a simple, easy to use timetable app, and nothing on the App Store quite fit the bill – everything was too complicated and hard to use.
Fast forward to today, and the app has had more than three million downloads, a lot of positive App Store ratings, and at times has been my primary source of income.
I’ve read a bunch of blogs recently about people that hit the jackpot, got their app featured, and were looking at figures like 100,000 downloads a day.
Class Timetable has never made the App Store #1 position, I didn’t become rich overnight, and I’ve failed more times than I’ve succeeded.
Imagine getting an email in all caps, telling you that you that your app is stuck ‘installing’ and that you need to fix it pretty frustrating, right? After a few emails like this, you realize that you can never make your product simple enough to use.
I’m sure there were other users with the same issues that couldn’t be bothered sending an email, and instead would simply stop using the app.
Class Timetable has never made the App Store front page, or had 100,000 downloads in a day – but that doesn’t matter to me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Podcasts, Analytics, and Centralization – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

Probably the first modern podcast was created by Dave Winer in 2003, although it wasn’t called a “Podcast”: that was coined by Ben Hammersley in 2004, and the inspiration was Apple’s iPod.
Still, while the media had a name, the “Industry”, such that it was, was very much the wild west: a scattering of podcast creators, podcatchers, and podcast listeners, finding each other by word-of-mouth.
Over the ensuing years the typical podcast sponsor was a bit less of a name brand – unless, of course, you were a regular podcast listener, in which case you quickly knew the brands by heart: Squarespace, Audible, Casper Mattress, Blue Apron, and recent favorite MeUndies.
The data part is obvious: while podcasters canreport download numbers, no one knows whether or not a podcast is played, or if the ads are skipped.
New extensions to Apple’s podcast feed specification will allow podcasts to define individual seasons and explain whether an episode is a teaser, a full episode, or bonus content.
These extensions will be read by the Podcast app and used to present a podcast in a richer way than the current, more linear, approach.
3 More pertinently all of the current podcast advertisers know exactly what they are getting: X amount of podcast ads results in Y number of conversions that result in Z amount of lifetime value.
For what it’s worth, Exponent has a much different profile: Apple Podcasts has about 13% share, while Overcast leads the way with 26% share, followed by Mobile Safari with 23% [↩]This shows why Casper mattresses are the exception that proves the rule: mattresses are not a subscription service, but they are much more expensive than most products bought online, which achieves the same effect as far as lifetime value is concerned [↩]I’m less worried about the fact other podcast players may not offer similar analytics: the Apple Podcast app will be used as a proxy, although this may hurt podcasts that have a smaller share of downloads via the Apple Podcast app [↩]It’s Google’s challenge in building a real hardware business in reverse [↩].

The orginal article.