Summary of “Apple Prime and the iPhone Pro”

Will Apple release an ‘iPhone Pro’ product?Will Apple release an ‘Apple Prime’ product?The first, comes by way of John Gruber, who yesterday wrote a post making the case for why Apple could release a new iPhone at a higher price point than the current high-end models.
For those more worried about any rising upfront costs, for the past couple of years, Apple has been touting their ‘iPhone Upgrade Program’ - including on-stage during iPhone unveilings.
Because you’re basically paying Apple in perpetuity.
We all understand why Apple outsourced the ‘iPhone Upgrade Program’ to Citizens Bank - again, Apple is not a bank.
Of course, even if they don’t fully go down that route, it leads to the notion of Apple offering some sort of premium service, perhaps akin to Amazon Prime.
The ‘iPhone Upgrade Program’ is far too expensive right now to be bundled into a hypothetical Apple Prime offering.
It’s an interesting thing to consider - especially for Apple’s most loyal ecosystem citizens - down the road.One easier and undoubtedly more palatable short-term opportunity for Apple: offer these hypothetical ‘Apple Prime’ members healthy discounts on the latest and greatest iPhones Priming the hardware that feeds into subscription services and vice/versa.
Because Apple has put the groundwork in place - no matter how shitty the foundation may be - to obfuscate the cost of such a device through the ‘iPhone Upgrade Program’.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Capitalism the Apple Way vs. Capitalism the Google Way”

While lots of attention is directed toward identifying the next great start-up, the defining tech-industry story of the last decade has been the rise of Apple and Google.
The greatest collision between Apple and Google is little noticed.
A few weeks after Apple’s concession to shareholders, the founders of Google announced a new share structure that would defend against a similar situation: The structure gave the founders’ shares 10 times the voting power of regular shares, ensuring they’d dictate the company’s strategy long into the future and that Google was, in the words of the founders, “Set up for success for decades to come.”
What has happened to Google and Apple in the wake of these events is the defining story of early 21st-century capitalism.
Several hedge funds started asking for much larger payouts, with some of them filing suits against Apple and even proposing an “iPref”-a new type of share that would allow Apple to release much more cash in a way that didn’t incur as high of a tax bill.
What has Google done in that same period? Google is, like Apple, making loads of money.
The paths taken by Apple and Google manifest alternative answers to one of the main questions facing capitalism today: What should public companies do with all of the money that they’re making? Even as corporations have brought in enormous profits, there has been a shortage of lucrative opportunities for investment and growth, creating surpluses of cash.
Who’s right? Which principal-agent problem is more vexing? Stock-market returns are one, albeit imperfect, way of answering this question and since the initial developments, Google has far outperformed Apple.

The orginal article.

Summary of “iPhone Bugs Are Too Valuable to Report to Apple”

“I wanna share some news with you,” Krstic said at the Black Hat conference, before announcing that Apple was finally launching a bug bounty program to reward friendly hackers who report bugs to the company.
Researchers I spoke to are reluctant to report bugs both because they are so valuable and because reporting some bugs may actually prevent them from doing more research.
All of them said they have yet to report a bug to Apple, and none of them know of anyone who has.
One of the reasons why the researchers we talked to aren’t itching to report bugs is that Apple’s rewards aren’t as high as they could or maybe should be.
In the private, gray market, where companies such as Zerodium buy exploits from researchers and sell them to their customers, a method comprised of multiple bugs that can jailbreak the iPhone is valued at $1.5 million.
“Either you report and kill your own bugs, or you decide not to report the bugs so that you don’t complicate your own life and you can keep doing research,” another researcher who was invited to Apple’s bug bounty program said.
Until Apple provides those devices, or invites more people to participate, the bug bounty program will have a hard time attracting serious attention from independent white-hat iPhone hackers.
In a way, the lack of bug submissions should also be seen as a testament to the security of the iPhone, but also as a sign the program needs changes, and perhaps more people looking for bugs, according to Guido.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Life, Death, and Legacy of iPhone Jailbreaking”

Beginning shortly after the first iPhone was launched, and picking up steam in 2008, jailbreaking was a full-blown cultural and economic phenomenon.
Users themselves have stopped demanding jailbreaks, because Apple simply took jailbreakers’ best ideas and implemented them into iOS. *. When the iPhone 7 was released on September 16, 2016, Todesco found a way to jailbreak the new version of iOS within a few hours of getting his phone in the mail.
The early pioneers of jailbreaking helped turn the original iPhone from a feature-light phone into a powerful tool that could do many of the things our phones do today, from playing video games to tracking your bike rides.
Ten years after the iPhone hit the sleek tables of Apple Stores worldwide, and the first-ever jailbreak, that Wild West is gone.
It’s a world where jailbreaking itself-at least jailbreaking as we’ve come to know it-might be over.
Apple, long aware that jailbreaking was becoming an increasingly mainstream trend, broke its silence on the practice on September 24, 2007, when the company issued a statement: “Apple has discovered that many of the unauthorized iPhone unlocking programs available on the Internet cause irreparable damage to the iPhone’s software, which will likely result in the modified iPhone becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iPhone software update is installed.”
Apple patched the bug that enabled the TIFF exploit, setting off what would be a years-long battle: The iPhone Dev Team and other jailbreaking crews would find a new vulnerability and release new jailbreaks.
One of the reasons was that the iPhone, in part because of the jailbreakers, has became harder to hack.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s AR is closer to reality than Google’s”

Next up on Apple’s agenda is augmented reality, the act of superimposing digital data and visuals atop a live video feed of your surroundings – something that Google, Microsoft, and many others have been experimenting with for a long time.
Apple is far from being able to claim it invented AR, but its new ARKit in iOS 11 is already showing signs to suggest that Apple will help bring AR into the mainstream faster and better than anyone else.
Apple’s AR will immediately reach millions of people who already have the requisite hardware.
Google’s Tango is about the future whereas Apple’s ARKit is about the present.
Considering how little time it took to develop two convincingly accurate AR measuring apps with the iOS 11 beta, and reading the comments from their makers, Apple also appears to have an advantage in the ease of development with ARKit.
It’s exciting to think that there are still three months before the release of the next iPhone and the accompanying finalization of iOS 11, by which time Apple’s big-budget app developer partners are likely to have a deluge of AR-enabled apps for people to play with.
Apple’s iPhone is more convenient than Google’s Project Tango devices and with iOS 11 it’ll have much better AR capabilities than its nearest premium Android rivals.
So if we’re looking for the AR innovator that will take the technology into the mainstream, Apple once again looks like the likeliest suspect.

The orginal article.

Summary of “iOS 11 preview: keep it simple, smarty”

You still start with a home screen grid of apps and folders, and the visual language that started way back in 2013 with iOS 7 isn’t radically changing either.
Multitasking The App Switcher is entirely new in iOS 11.
The real trick is bringing up a “Slide Over” app, which amounts to a skinny hovering window you can arrange on the left or right on top of either a single app or a split-view app.
It’s internal to the browser app so when you do it you can’t use split view to get another app – though you can bring in a slide over app.
Say you have two apps open in split view: you can drag on an image or some text, drag it over to the other app, and place it.
Files app The last part of the Trifecta of “Computer things” in iOS 11 is the most obvious one: a better way to handle files.
For developers, the App Store, for example, now splits out games and apps, which might help juice the market for real productivity apps on the iPad. It also created a really solid, automatic screen recording feature, which is the very thing I’ve used to make the GIFs in this article.
Keep it simple, smarty When you combine this trifecta of better multitasking, drag and drop, and the Files app, you get much closer to using the iPad like a traditional computer than ever before.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 4 people Steve Jobs handpicked to review the iPhone reflect 10 years later [Video]”

With the iPhone, we became, for the first time, a society of people who were online continuously-wherever we went.
Steve Jobs had unveiled the iPhone onstage in January 2007, but the phone he displayed wasn’t anywhere near finished.
POGUE: We are assembled on the anniversary of a great event, the unveiling of the iPhone 10 years ago.
The laptop, the desktops, are what we always think of when we hear “PC or Mac.” But really, the personal computer that people rely on, is the one that Steve Jobs introduced 10 years ago.
POGUE: Were all four of us in the room when Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone?
More.POGUE: So. Now iPhone sales, for the first time in 10 years, have reached a peak and are dipping down.
A lot of people say, since Steve Jobs died six years ago, Apple doesn’t have this idea man anymore.
Ten years in, what’s the impact of the iPhone? Is it what we predicted?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The tragedy of FireWire: Collaborative tech torpedoed by corporations”

A joint effort from several competitors including Apple, IBM, and Sony, FireWire was a triumph of design for the greater good.
Realized to the fullest, FireWire could replace SCSI and the unwieldy mess of ports and cables at the back of a desktop computer.
FireWire’s principal creator, Apple, nearly killed it before it could appear in a single device.
A bus is a kind of channel over which various types of data can flow between computer components, and an internal bus is for expansion cards like scientific instruments or dedicated graphics processing.
“Real quickly there were some people-including a guy named David James, who was with Hewlett-Packard architecture labs at the time-who were saying, ‘Yes, we want a serial bus, too,'” Teener said.
Shortly after he arrived, Apple began looking for a successor to the Apple Desktop Bus, ADB, which was used for very low-speed devices such as keyboards and mice.
The Game Boy link cable was the first major connector that put the fragile springy parts inside the cable.
As many as 63 devices could be networked together on the same bus, and all were hot-swappable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The iPhone Is 10 Years Old. Here’s the Story of Its Birth.”

The iPhone dwells among us, but it looks – it’s designed to look – as if it just moments ago entered our world from some higher, more ideal plane of existence.
The iPhone knows everything about us, but we know very little about it.
As Merchant demonstrates, it was actually invented several different times, including in the 1960s at England’s Royal Radar Establishment and in the 1970s at CERN. The specific multitouch technology that went into the iPhone was pioneered around the turn of the millennium by a man you’ve almost certainly never heard of named Wayne Westerman.
The iPhone is designed for maximum efficiency and compactness.
It’s curiously unilluminating to read a metallurgical analysis of a pulverized iPhone, or to watch Merchant trudge around the globe on a kind of iCalvary in search of the raw materials Apple uses – through a Stygian Bolivian tin mine and a lithium mine in the Chilean desert and an e-waste dump in Nairobi where many iPhones end up.
The iPhone masquerades as a thing not made by human hands.
Merchant’s book makes visible that human labor, and in the process dispels some of the fog and reality distortion that surround the iPhone.
If the iPhone was a revolution, who or what exactly was overthrown? One of the stories Merchant tells comes from Grignon, who was the first person to receive a call on the iPhone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leaked recording: Inside Apple’s global war on leakers”

The briefing, titled “Stopping Leakers – Keeping Confidential at Apple,” was led by Director of Global Security David Rice, Director of Worldwide Investigations Lee Freedman, and Jenny Hubbert, who works on the Global Security communications and training team.
According to the hour-long presentation, Apple’s Global Security team employs an undisclosed number of investigators around the world to prevent information from reaching competitors, counterfeiters, and the press, as well as hunt down the source when leaks do occur.
He’s directed the Global Security team at Apple for more than six years, according to his LinkedIn page.
Rice says, Apple has cracked down on leaks from its factories so successfully that more breaches are now happening on Apple’s campuses in California than its factories abroad. “Last year was the first year that Apple [campuses] leaked more than the supply chain,” Rice tells the room.
The Global Security team in China has been “Busting their ass” to solve the problem of leaks stemming from Apple’s factories, Rice says, describing the efforts as “Trench warfare non-stop.”
Later, during the employee Q&A, Rice gleefully recounts a blog post written by longtime Apple watcher John Gruber, in which Gruber criticized Apple scoop machine Mark Gurman, who now works at Bloomberg, for not having juicy details on Apple’s new HomePod speaker before it was released.
Apple embeds members of a team within Global Security, called Secrecy Program Management, on some product teams to help employees keep secrets, he explains.
Hubbert prompts him to talk about two major leakers who were caught the previous year, one who worked at Apple’s online store “For a couple years” and one who worked on iTunes for “About six years.”

The orginal article.