Summary of “Apple Is Ramping Up Work on AR Headset to Succeed iPhone”

Apple Inc., seeking a breakthrough product to succeed the iPhone, aims to have technology ready for an augmented-reality headset in 2019 and could ship a product as early as 2020.
As with previous products, Apple isn’t waiting around for someone else to create a chip capable of powering its AR headset.
Just as tvOS powers the Apple TV, macOS runs on Macs and watchOS runs on Apple Watches, “rOS” will power Apple’s AR headset.
Apple hasn’t finalized how users will control the headset and launch apps, but is investigating touch panels, voice-activation via Siri and head gestures.
The company has discussed pairing the headset with its own version of the App Store, where users would be able to download content, just as they do with the iPhone, Watch, Apple TV and Mac.
Because Apple doesn’t have a fully operational headset of its own, engineers have begun using HTC Vive headsets for testing purposes.
Apple doesn’t plan to sell the gadget but instead aims to use it internally to test AR apps next year.
With the headset at least two years away, Apple wants to make it easier for developers to bring new AR features to the iPhone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Apple built the iPhone X”

Sure, the company released three phones this fall, and like a parent who insists they love all of their children equally, Apple claims that the iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and iPhone X are each unique and special in their own way.
Mashable recently sat down with Schiller and other senior members of Apple’s executive team including SVP of software engineering Craig Federighi, SVP hardware engineering Dan Riccio, and VP of user interface design Alan Dye for a wide-ranging discussion about how they built what is perhaps the most eagerly-anticipated smartphone since Apple’s founder Steve Jobs unveiled the original iPhone more than a decade ago.
Like virtually all other Apple products, the iPhone X was born out of a collaborative, cross-departmental process.
The Apple executives also revealed for the first time just how difficult it was for them to remove the home button, and why they don’t think “The notch,” where the iPhone X’s TrueDepth imaging module resides, is that big of a deal.
Perhaps it’s no secret that Apple wanted to do away with buttons and even the “Head” and “Chin” – mostly dead-space on the iPhone – but the Apple executives offered some fascinating insight into why this is happening now and how Apple identified the moment when all the necessary technologies percolating for years were ready to make an all-screen iPhone possible.
Apple’s continuing pride in the home button was clear to me as Schiller described how hard they worked on it and how, over each iPhone generation, it has changed, becoming more powerful, and, when they added Touch ID, critical to the iPhone operation and security.
Federighi said Apple is taking advantage of attention detection and managing how often the iPhone X looks back at you.
There isn’t even a custom version of iOS 11 for the iPhone X. Instead, Apple engineered the underlying the mechanics of how UI operates and the engine behind it to support both iPhone X and the traditional iPhone experience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Improbable Origins of PowerPoint”

PowerPoint was not the first software for creating presentations on personal computers.
At the time, commentators saw the proliferation of business software as a new phase in office automation, in which computer use was spreading beyond the accounting department and the typing pool to the office elites.
PowerPoint thus emerged during a period in which personal computing was taking over the American office.
Many of the bright young computer scientists and engineers recruited to work at PARC knew one another from the major computer science programs funded by the Department of Defense’s Advanced Research Projects Agency at MIT, Carnegie Mellon, Stanford, UC Berkeley, the University of Utah, and SRI. In 1972, PARC researchers began to focus on a new personal computer they called the Alto.
These computers would be networked to one another and to other, larger computers, both locally and far away.
The Alto’s creators emphasized the machine’s graphics capabilities, dedicating much of the computer’s hardware and software to rendering high-⁠resolution imagery onscreen, including typography, drawings, digital photographs, and animations.
Work on Foundation was set aside, while the firm focused on software publishing-that is, manufacturing, marketing, and supporting computer programs written by others.
David C. Brock is a historian of technology and director of the Center for Software History at the Computer History Museum, in Mountain View, Calif..

The orginal article.

Summary of “iPhone X: Tomorrow’s iPhone today”

The iPhone 8 is the latest iteration on the original, offering improvements while maintaining the conventions that have been part of the iPhone since its conception.
In my hand, the iPhone X feels very much like the iPhone 8-the glass makes it much easier to grip than the iPhone 6 or 7.
Since this is an unusual year in which Apple’s releasing two different families of iPhone models, it’s worth going over where the iPhone X is the same as the iPhone 8, and where it’s different.
The iPhone X camera is slightly more advanced than the one on the iPhone 8 Plus, most specifically its telephoto camera module: It’s got a wider aperture, and it’s got built-in optical image stabilization, which is only available on the wide-angle camera on the iPhone 8 Plus.
Of course, the iPhone X can also shoot portrait images via its front-facing selfie camera, thanks to all the same depth-sensing technology that lets it run Face ID. As I mentioned above, I’ve resisted the siren song of the iPhone Plus models for years because they’re just too big to fit in my hand.
It’s worth noting that the iPhone X is not what it was once assumed by some to be: this is not an iPhone 8 Plus crammed into the body of an iPhone 8.
The iPhone Plus can fit more data on its screen, and more apps will optionally display in landscape mode on the iPhone Plus.
iPhone Plus users won’t lose their cameras if they make the move to the iPhone X, but they’ll probably feel a little bit cramped.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google and Amazon bet on artificial intelligence versus Apple”

Gadgets are going through a major change AI and cloud computing are more important than “Speeds and feeds” The shift benefits Google and Amazon and poses a big risk for Apple.
So far, it’s Google and Amazon leading the charge, even as this shift stands to hit hardware-centric companies like Apple hardest.
Google baked all kinds of artificial intelligence goodness into the Pixel 2.
The Google Assistant is very good – so good, that Apple should be embarrassed about how far behind Siri is.
Suddenly, by applying its considerable edge in artificial intelligence, Google has transformed an unremarkable little machine into a flagship.
While Apple has been investing heavily in R&D, it still can’t match the progress made by Amazon, Google, or Microsoft in AI and cloud computing – you only need to look at the vast difference between what Alexa and Google Assistant can do, versus the limitations of Apple’s Siri.
A lot of the smartest apps for iPhone come from Google itself, including the popular Google Photos app.
It’s no coincidence that Amazon and Google operate their own cloud computing platforms for outside app developers to use.

The orginal article.

Summary of “iPhone X review: face the future”

I personally think the iPhone 4 is the most beautiful phone of all time, and I’d say the iPhone X is in third place in the iPhone rankings after that phone and the original model.
We’ll just have to see how it goes with the iPhone X. Cameras I haven’t had a lot of time to play with the cameras on the iPhone X, but the short answer is that they look almost exactly like the cameras on the iPhone 8.
Face ID: it works, mostly The single most important feature of the iPhone X is Face ID, the system that unlocks the phone by recognizing your face.
Even that’s an understatement: the entire design and user experience of the iPhone X is built around Face ID. Face ID is what let Apple ditch the home button and Touch ID fingerprint sensor.
If Face ID doesn’t work, the entire promise of the iPhone X falls apart.
You also can’t be too casual about it: I had a lot of problems pulling the iPhone X out of my pocket and having it fail to unlock until Apple clarified that Face ID works best at a distance of 25 to 50 centimeters away from your face, or about 10 to 20 inches.
That’s closer than I usually hold my phone when I pull it out of my pocket to check something, which means I had to actively think about holding the iPhone X closer to my face than every other phone I’ve ever used.
If you’re buying an iPhone X expecting a radical change to your iPhone experience, well, you probably won’t get it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple is not America’s favorite tech company”

When asked how much they enjoyed using a company’s products and services, Apple scored the lowest among the big five technology companies – Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft – in the category for both “Somewhat liked” and “Greatly liked.” Among those expressing negative sentiment, Apple scored better than Facebook, yet still lower than Amazon, Google, and Microsoft.
On the topic of whether respondents would recommend Apple products and services to friends and family, the company again fell behind Google and Amazon, both of which garnered responses of either “Somewhat likely” to “Extremely likely” from more than 90 percent of survey participants.
Participants trusted Apple less than even Google, a company with a primary business model of collecting consumer data for targeting advertisements.
For passion, as measured by how much a participant would care if the company disappeared tomorrow, Apple came in last among the big five, with less than 40 percent of participants saying they would care “Very much” if the company and its products disappeared tomorrow, and nearly 20 percent saying they would not care “At all.” When it comes to societal impact, Apple surpassed Facebook and Microsoft, but fell behind Google and Amazon, in the number of participants who felt the company had a “Very positive” impact on the world.
Apple appears to have been eclipsed by companies that are becoming more deeply embedded in the fabric of everyday life Google controls search, email, web browsing, the world’s most popular mobile operating system, the leading US online video site, and is now producing more than a half-dozen hardware products from phones, laptops, and VR headsets to speakers, routers, and earbuds.
A recent poll from CNBC, titled the “All-America Economic Survey,” found that 64 percent of Americans own an Apple product, evidence that Apple’s ubiquity in consumer hardware remains undeniable.
Apple has also had a meandering path since smartphones began dominating the computing landscape, leading to accusations that the company has run out of ideas.
That’s where the tech industry is headed, and Apple may find that fewer and fewer consumers care all that much about the best new phone, tablet, or laptop when the most exciting advances in technology are happening elsewhere.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to wash your apples, according to science”

How do you clean your apples before you eat them? A rinse under the faucet? A brisk wipe with your sleeve? Whatever the method, chances are you’re doing it wrong, according to a new study.
Unless they’re organic, apples have probably been sprayed with synthetic insecticides.
They sprayed organic Gala apples with the fungicide thiabendazole and the insecticide phosmet-both of which are EPA-approved for use on apples-and let the fruit sit for 24 hours.
They then washed each apple with plain water, a bleach solution typically used by US fruit purveyors, and a solution of water with 1% baking soda.
For each of the three options, they tested both a two- and an eight-minute wash before rinsing each apple again with water.
The baking soda solution cleared off all of the thiabendazole from the apple skins after 12 and all of the phosmet after 15 minutes.
Though thiabendazole and phosmet might be toxic in very large quantities, they are safe for human consumption at the levels they’re typically used at for apple farming, according to the EPA. But if you really want to minimize your exposure, the study suggests, wash them in a mixture of one teaspoon of baking soda for every two cups of water.
Correction: An earlier version of this piece said organic apples aren’t sprayed with pesticides; in fact they may be, but with organic ones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet The Woman Who Wants To Change The Way You Buy Your iPhone”

At the store, Apple products don’t have to share shelf space with competitors; the company can fully control the customer experience; and patrons can be enticed beyond the iPhone into buying iPads, laptops, and other, more expensive items gleaming on the store floor.
In 2015, only 11% of US customers bought an iPhone – the company’s best-selling product and the source of over half of its revenue – from Apple.
The majority of people who do buy directly from Apple do it online.
Ahrendts-era Apple stores are commerce engines, expertly designed to sell you a $1,000 iPhone in a beautiful glass dome anyone can walk into.
You can now go to the Apple Store to learn how to code in a schmancy new theater, or watch a performance by an Apple Music-featured singer-songwriter, or sit under a tree with a Genius to figure out why your iPhone doesn’t charge anymore, or watch as an illustrator doodles live.
Ahrendts-era Apple Stores are commerce engines, expertly designed to sell you a $1,000 iPhone in a beautiful glass dome anyone can walk into.
Unsurprisingly, Apple is expanding in China in a big way.
“A technical specialist who moved from a longtime classic store to a newer location when Ahrendts started said Apple retail”now feels more like a Circuit City, a Best Buy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jimmy Iovine: Apple Music ‘Not Even Close’ to Success With Streaming”

“I don’t believe that what exists right now is enough.” Jimmy Iovine, who runs Apple Music – originally Beats, the music service and electronics business that he and co-founder Dr. Dre sold to Apple for $3 billion in 2014 – is on a tear about the deficiencies of streaming services, ­including his own.
Apple Music tells Billboard that it now counts well over 30 million ­paying ­subscribers, helping fuel a 17 percent revenue jump for the U.S. recorded-music business in the first half of 2017 over the same period a year ago, according to the RIAA. Meanwhile, Goldman Sachs issued a report in August predicting that ­subscription streaming would drive the global record business to nearly triple to $41 billion by 2030.
The veteran record executive – who got his start sweeping out recording studios, later produced hit records for acts from Bruce Springsteen to U2, and then co-founded Interscope Records, which he ran until 2014 – is working to crack what he sees as the music industry’s biggest challenge: how to inject enough “Soul” into subscription streaming services so that fans will pay $10 a month instead of listening to their tunes on free services, which are also growing fast.
To do it, he’s relying on BBC Radio 1 ­veteran Zane Lowe, now creative ­director and L.A. anchor for Apple Music’s free radio service Beats 1, and Apple Music head of content Larry Jackson, a former A&R ­executive at Interscope and other labels.
Apple, which has about 800 million iTunes ­customers around the world, has more levers to pull: The company recently started promoting Apple Music ­subscriptions more heavily through ads and on its iTunes Store, where it began selling 99-cent singles in 2003.
The trio is also hoping for changes to the way Billboard ­calculates its charts – where a free stream on YouTube counts equally to a paid stream on Apple Music – which could ­incentivize artists and labels to promote their music on higher-paying platforms, rather than racking up free streams to win the No. 1 slot.
Can Apple do more to drive customers to Apple Music?
Everybody likes Apple Music and wants it to ­happen.

The orginal article.