Summary of “Jimmy Iovine: Apple Music ‘Not Even Close’ to Success With Streaming”

“I don’t believe that what exists right now is enough.” Jimmy Iovine, who runs Apple Music – originally Beats, the music service and electronics business that he and co-founder Dr. Dre sold to Apple for $3 billion in 2014 – is on a tear about the deficiencies of streaming services, ­including his own.
Apple Music tells Billboard that it now counts well over 30 million ­paying ­subscribers, helping fuel a 17 percent revenue jump for the U.S. recorded-music business in the first half of 2017 over the same period a year ago, according to the RIAA. Meanwhile, Goldman Sachs issued a report in August predicting that ­subscription streaming would drive the global record business to nearly triple to $41 billion by 2030.
The veteran record executive – who got his start sweeping out recording studios, later produced hit records for acts from Bruce Springsteen to U2, and then co-founded Interscope Records, which he ran until 2014 – is working to crack what he sees as the music industry’s biggest challenge: how to inject enough “Soul” into subscription streaming services so that fans will pay $10 a month instead of listening to their tunes on free services, which are also growing fast.
To do it, he’s relying on BBC Radio 1 ­veteran Zane Lowe, now creative ­director and L.A. anchor for Apple Music’s free radio service Beats 1, and Apple Music head of content Larry Jackson, a former A&R ­executive at Interscope and other labels.
Apple, which has about 800 million iTunes ­customers around the world, has more levers to pull: The company recently started promoting Apple Music ­subscriptions more heavily through ads and on its iTunes Store, where it began selling 99-cent singles in 2003.
The trio is also hoping for changes to the way Billboard ­calculates its charts – where a free stream on YouTube counts equally to a paid stream on Apple Music – which could ­incentivize artists and labels to promote their music on higher-paying platforms, rather than racking up free streams to win the No. 1 slot.
Can Apple do more to drive customers to Apple Music?
Everybody likes Apple Music and wants it to ­happen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Apple Built An iPhone Camera That Makes Everyone A Professional Photographer”

Like the camera in every iPhone that preceded them, Apple is touting the cameras in the iPhone 8 Plus and the forthcoming iPhone X as its best ever.
A number of early reviews of the iPhone 8 obsess over the camera – TechCrunch, for example, chose to review the phone exclusively as a camera.
“There’s the Augmented Reality team, saying, ‘Hey, we need more from the camera because we want to make AR a better experience and the camera plays a role in that,'” Schiller says.
“And the team that’s creating Face ID, they need camera technology and hardware, software, sensors, and lenses to support on-device biometric identification. And so there are many roles the camera plays, either as a primary thing – to take a picture – or as a support thing, to help unlock your phone or enable an AR experience. And so there’s a great deal of work between all the teams and all of these elements.”
“It’s never just ‘let’s make a better camera.’ It’s what camera can we create? What can we contribute to photography?”.
He quickly follows up with an addendum that tells you most everything you need to know about Apple and camera design: “It’s never just ‘let’s make a better camera,'” he says.
The debut of the updated dual lens camera systems in the iPhone 8 Plus and the iPhone X seems likely to reiterate it.
“What does it mean to be a photographer? What does it mean to capture a memory? If you start there – and not with a long list of possible features to check off – you often end up with something better. When you take away the complexity of how the camera works, the technology just disappears. Then people can apply all your creativity to that moment you’re capturing. And you get some incredible photographs.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “iOS 11 review: Control Center, multitasking, and much more”

Dig around the Files app The next thing you should check out is the new Files app on iOS 11.
The other reason to stop by the Files app is that it’s a good place to start playing around with another great iOS 11 feature: drag and drop.
More apps will need to gain support for drag and drop to make it truly useful on the iPad, but I’m a little disappointed that it’s not available on the iPhone.
You can do split screen as before, but there’s more freedom to set your “Skinny” app on either side.
It’s much too early to know whether AR apps are going to be more than a fun trick to play around with for a few minutes before you forget about it – though that’s been the way many AR and VR things have gone.
Apple’s famous for getting developers on board with really good apps, we expect the same will be true in iOS 11.
If you really want to get a sense of the vibe that Apple is going for, take a tour through the Apple News app and especially the newly redesigned App Store.
Apple has basically turned the App Store into a tiny little magazine for apps.

The orginal article.

Summary of “iOS 11, thoroughly reviewed”

It started with the $329 iPad back in April, a compelling tablet that’s both good and cheap enough to entice upgraders and people who have never bought a tablet before.
It continued in June, with new 10.5- and 12.9-inch iPad Pros with high-end screens and powerful specs that make them look and feel a lot more “Pro” than they did before.
This is all really good, compelling, well-differentiated hardware, and it has paid off for Apple so far-the new tablet drove year-over-year iPad sales up for the first time in more than three years.
While it’s not clear where the trendlines are ultimately heading, Apple has to be happy that the tablet it has described as “The future of computing” doesn’t appear to be in terminal decline.
Today, the good news for the iPad continues with the public release of iOS 11.
Apple has put a lot of work into the iPad-related parts of the operating system this year-the tablet still exists somewhere in between the iPhone and the Mac, but the changes to the UI and to the underpinnings of iOS 11 help iPads move further toward the Mac than they’ve ever been before.
The upgrade is even more significant for tablets than iOS 9, both because the changes are bigger and because more iPads can actually take advantage of all these fancy productivity features now.
In this review, I’ll be focusing on iOS 11 features that are available to current phones and tablets that are updating from iOS 10.

The orginal article.

Summary of “With Its $999 Price Tag, Apple’s iPhone X Is a Luxury”

On September 5, 2007, Apple slashed the price of the original iPhone from $599 to $399. The aggressive strategy, meant to catapult the device from a luxury gadget to a middle-class necessity, angered early adopters to the point that Steve Jobs had to issue an apology and refund them $100 each.
The iPhone 8, the incremental upgrade to last year’s iPhone 7, will cost $50 more than its predecessor, starting at $699. And the iPhone X, the company’s new high-end device that CEO Tim Cook called “The future of the smartphone,” will start at $999. The reveal of the huge price tag on Tuesday felt like a full-circle moment at an iPhone event already focused on echoing the past.
Unlike the original iPhone, it’s not clear the X will feel like an essential product to people who never knew they needed one.
The Verge has already declared that the iPhone X’s high price tag is worth it.
The closest thing Apple might have to that world-changing lineage of products is augmented reality, a new obsession in Cupertino, but the iPhone 8, and not just the more expensive X, will support AR functionality.
More than anything else, the iPhone X seems to be offering luxury for its own sake.
Last holiday, after several quarters of falling sales, the iPhone bounced back on the strength of the iPhone 7 Plus, its most expensive model.
The average worldwide retail price of a smartphone before the iPhone launched was $200; today it’s $310, according to data gathered by Sharma.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What the iPhone X borrowed from the Palm Pre”

I have become the unofficial standard bearer for webOS, the operating system created by Palm for the Pre and its successive devices.
So as the bearer of a thoroughly-tattered banner, I’ve been hearing a lot of people ask what I thought about the iPhone X and how it borrows many of the ideas first introduced by Palm.
Just because Palm did some stuff first doesn’t take away from Apple is doing them now.
Both Google with the Galaxy Nexus and Samsung with many other devices have been making unlocking your phone with your face possible – but all of them have been pretty bad compared to what I experienced with the iPhone X. That’s not a Palm example, but it’s instructive: ideas float around and sometimes Apple does a better job of implementing them than others who did it first.
Wireless Charging Palm was the first major smartphone maker to popularize wireless charging.
Later, Palm did what it should have done in the first place and got rid of the home button, replacing it with a small LED strip.
First There’s a giant pile of other things that webOS did first that both iOS and Android eventually borrowed.
Palm’s way of doing it still hasn’t been replicated by anybody, and as I said I’m not sure if it would hold up as well in 2017 as it did when Palm first introduced it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s Best Product Is Its Media Strategy”

The big question on everyone’s mind, as Apple CEO Tim Cook stepped onstage to announce an array of iPhones and a new Apple Watch and a new Apple TV on Tuesday, was: Will there be a nuclear war with North Korea?
Apple doesn’t have press conferences, it has “Events.” On Tuesday, the event was in Apple’s new home, a vast new 175-acre campus that, as Cook said, “Fuses buildings with an open parkland.” It’s a stunning place, with rolling hills and – according to Apple – some 9,000 newly planted trees.
Forever looming in the distance, across the park, is Apple’s new headquarters building.
“What’s going to keep Apple Apple – is if we keep us us,” said the voice in the darkness.
The real show began when Cook called Angela Ahrendts, the former Burberry CEO who left to run Apple’s retail efforts, onstage.
Apple isn’t in the phone business or the computer business.
Apple knows precisely how many people will attend each event, and clearly thinks carefully about how the hands-on area is laid out.
Some publications – typically bigger ones, or ones with an audience Apple particularly wants to reach – will get review units.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple’s iPhone X notch is an odd design choice”

Apple’s new iPhone X has a spectacular edge-to-edge display that dominates the entire front of the device.
Unlike Xiaomi’s Mi Mix 2, Samsung’s Galaxy S8, and LG’s V30, Apple hasn’t kept the iPhone X top bezel intact; and compared to the Essential Phone, its camera array is much, much more noticeable… and odd-looking.
While the iPhone X design was leaked several times before Apple was able to officially unveil it, the company revealed this week that it is fully embracing the notch and not hiding it away with software.
The iPhone X renders webpages with white bars on the side if you’re using it in landscape orientation.
The entire notch exists because Apple is introducing Face ID with the iPhone X, a replacement for Touch ID that uses infrared cameras to scan your face and log you into your phone.
Both of these options would have resulted in compromises elsewhere, whether in apps that couldn’t fill the status bar with custom colors, or extend to full screen, or simply by the iPhone X looking very similar in design to Samsung’s Galaxy S8. Most iPhone X users will use the phone in portrait mode for the vast majority of tasks, so the notch likely won’t be an issue outside of viewing photos and video or playing games.
Apple’s design choice looks ugly thanks to the permanent notch at the top, but its decision to embrace it should also encourage developers to do the same and offer more unique ways to handle the display.
Apple’s quest to build a full-screen iPhone means that the notch is here to stay.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New iPhone Will Complete Apple’s War on Buttons”

If you want to know how deep Apple’s hate for buttons goes, look no further than the very first iPhone announcement.
“Here’s four smartphones,” Jobs said to a room of journalists in 2007, waving his hand up to the floor-to-ceiling screen behind him that displayed the Motorola Q, BlackBerry, Palm Treo, and Nokia E62-products whose bottom halves were filled with directional buttons and physical keyboards.
Minutes later he would reveal the iPhone: a gadget that was nothing but a smooth glass screen punctuated by a single circular button.
“It’s stupid. But I think there’s truth to it, because Apple believes very strongly from its design standpoint that buttons are clutter, that there can only be as many controls that are necessary, and no more.”
Anyone who chooses to upgrade will reportedly be instructed to follow a new routine, one that involves interacting with a virtual, gesture-based control center instead. The screen on the iPhone 8 will reportedly be completely flat-a culmination of the company’s long-waged War on Buttons.
As technology kept evolving, the button’s depth became more shallow, and their shapes less bulbous, until people like Jobs decided to transfer entire keyboards to capacitive touchscreens.
In Eubanks’s mind, the lingering nostalgia for old-school buttons in the realm of personal computers is less about necessary function, and more centered around the human desire for mutual communication.
There’s no question that Home button loyalists will be in good company when the time comes to commiserate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Lessons and Questions of the iPhone X and the iPhone 8 – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

To that end, the products Apple unveiled at the new Steve Jobs Theater could not have been more appropriate: a cellular watch significantly smaller than competitors with comparable battery life, a new iPhone 8 improved in virtually every dimension, and, of course, the iPhone X, with nearly every new feature dependent on that integration.
Moving beyond the notch, Apple is also demonstrating its power over users; using an iPhone X is going to be significantly different than any other previous iPhone.
Specifically, the iPhone 7 Plus was $769, $20 more than the iPhone 6S Plus at launch; the iPhone 7 pricing was identical to the iPhone 6S. Theoretically this should have curbed demand for the 7 Plus, but the opposite happened: Apple sold more 7 Pluses relative to the 7 than they did 6S Pluses relative to the 6S. To be clear, I don’t think they sold more because of the price range; rather, consumer preferences continued to move towards bigger phones and, at least for an iPhone buyer, price simply isn’t the top priority.
The iPhone 8 serves the slow and steady markets that bought the iPhone 7: previous iPhone owner upgrading and Android switchers.
Critically, the iPhone 8 also serves those folks who aspire to an iPhone.
No, they can’t afford an iPhone 8, but the iPhone 6S they can afford looks almost exactly the same, and in a few years the iPhone 8 will still be viewed as a once-flagship.
That said, I think Apple is taking a pretty significant risk with the iPhone 8 in particular: we know the company can succeed by selling the “Best” phone, but the one example we have of building a less-than-best phone was underwhelming; to that end, how many iPhone buyers will forgo the 8 to wait for the X? In some respects this is a good problem to have – customers wanting to give you more money for a more expensive phone – but the fact the iPhone X is not launching until November suggests it is well behind in production, which further suggests supply will be limited for some time to come.
My argument about WeChat’s effect on Apple is that it elevates the importance of fresh hardware designs over iOS when it comes to iPhone sales; iPhone X is as fresh as it gets.

The orginal article.