Summary of “Science is deeply imaginative: why is this treated as a secret?”

These students, aged 17-18, would tell me that they just didn’t see in science any room for their own imagination or creativity.
Science education favours the presentation of results, and a focus on knowledge, rather than the human stories of wonder, imagination, failed ideas and those glorious and uninvited moments of illumination that thread through the lives of all who actually do science.
Our media mouths the same message – I will never forget the BBC documentary on computer science in which the presenter assured viewers, face to camera, that there is no room for imagination in science.
Without making the naive claim that art and science are in any sense ‘doing the same thing’, the narrative similarities in the experience of those who work with them are remarkable.
Juxtaposed catalogues of creation-stories in science and art, followed by an extended ‘contrast and compare’ essay, increasingly failed to do justice to the material.
The entanglement between science and the written word in prose or poetry might possess a principle knot at the birth of the novel, as we have already noted, but its story is a much longer one.
The phenomenologist tradition from Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty to Hannah Arendt speaks of a relational mode between the human and nonhuman that deploys both art and science to describe nature as if it were the product of human imagination.
More widely, the contemplative good of lay science, of engagement with high-quality scientific writing, including the poetic ‘notable exceptions’ – John Carey’s The Faber Book of Science is a good start – recognising that science holds as deep a structural place in human culture as art does, will only enrich and enable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rilke on the Lonely Patience of Creative Work”

“The most regretful people on earth,” the poet Mary Oliver wrote in contemplating the artist’s task and the central commitment of the creative life, “Are those who felt the call to creative work, who felt their own creative power restive and uprising, and gave to it neither power nor time.”
That is what Rainer Maria Rilke, another great poet with a philosophical bent and uncommon existential insight, explored a century earlier in the third letter collected in his indispensable Letters to a Young Poet – the wellspring of wisdom on art and life, which Rilke bequeathed to the 19-year-old cadet and budding poet Franz Xaver Kappus.
Rilke’s first letter to his young correspondent had laid out his core ideas about what it takes to be an artist.
The patience of making art is a lonely patience – one that demands the solitude essential for creative work, be it art or science, so widely recognized by creators across time and discipline.
“Solitude, a rest from responsibilities, and peace of mind, will do you more good than the atmosphere of the studio and the conversations,” the young Louise Bourgeois counseled an artist friend in the following century, just as the poet May Sarton was exulting in her sublime ode to solitude: “There is no place more intimate than the spirit alone.”
To let each impression and each germ of a feeling come to completion wholly in itself, in the dark, in the inexpressible, the unconscious, beyond the reach of one’s own intelligence, and await with deep humility and patience the birth-hour of a new clarity: that alone is living the artist’s life: in understanding as in creating.
Letters to a Young Poet – which also gave us Rilke on what it really means to love, the life-expanding value of uncertainty, and why we read – remains one of the most beautiful, profound, and timeless works ever composed.
Complement this particular portion with Rachel Carson on writing and the loneliness of creative work and Virginia Woolf on the relationship between loneliness and creativity, then revisit Rilke on the nature of creativity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Column One: Hollywood scenic painter Mike Denering can’t quite put down his brush”

In his faded jeans, button-down shirt and sneakers that betray a hint of paint speckles, Mike Denering cut an unassuming figure ambling across the Fox Studios lot in Century City.
At 66, Denering is one of Hollywood’s last scenic painters.
Scenic painter Mike Denering in front of a mural, a scene from “The Seven Year Itch” that he restored back in 2016 with artist Jim Katranis on the exterior of Stage 10 at Fox Studios in Los Angeles.
From left are scenic artists Mike Denering, John Moffitt and Jonathan Williams.
Robin Williams in “What Dreams May Come.” Mike Denering and John Moffitt were the lead scenic artists on the 1998 film, using digital and hand-painted elements.
In 1989, Denering bought a house in Sun Valley, a drowsy rustic community at the base of the Verdugo Mountains about 15 miles north of Hollywood.
When Denering started, scenic artists often painted in the plein-air technique – working outside to be able to replicate the gradations of light and color in nature.
Mike Denering was a scenic artist for the 1988 film “Die Hard,” starring Bruce Willis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Third Self”

Two hundred years before social media, the great French artist Eugène Delacroix lamented the necessary torment of avoiding social distractions in creative work; a century and a half later, Agnes Martin admonished aspiring artists to exercise discernment in the interruptions they allow, or else corrupt the mental, emotional, and spiritual privacy where inspiration arises.
Just as self-criticism is the most merciless kind of criticism and self-compassion the most elusive kind of compassion, self-distraction is the most hazardous kind of distraction, and the most difficult to protect creative work against.
Let all of them work, as ordinarily they do, in confident familiarity with whatever the work requires, and no more.
In creative work – creative work of all kinds – those who are the world’s working artists are not trying to help the world go around, but forward.
Part of this something-elseness, Oliver argues, is the uncommon integration of the creative self – the artist’s work cannot be separated from the artist’s whole life, nor can its wholeness be broken down into the mechanical bits-and-pieces of specific actions and habits.
Intellectual work sometimes, spiritual work certainly, artistic work always – these are forces that fall within its grasp, forces that must travel beyond the realm of the hour and the restraint of the habit.
The working, concentrating artist is an adult who refuses interruption from himself, who remains absorbed and energized in and by the work – who is thus responsible to the work Serious interruptions to work are never the inopportune, cheerful, even loving interruptions which come to us from another.
The most regretful people on earth are those who felt the call to creative work, who felt their own creative power restive and uprising, and gave to it neither power nor time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The five most creative cities in the world?”

Historically, cities are an essential ingredient for creating great art, from Classical Athens and Renaissance Florence to post-war New York and swinging London.
The international art map is changing, and a new generation of cultural hubs is emerging, well away from global financial centres, property developers and blue-chip art dealers.
While a trust fund feels like a prerequisite for making it as an artist in the likes of London, New York and Paris today, this new generation of art cities exists well beyond the canon of Western art history.
Often overshadowed by its flashier neighbours Abu Dhabi and Dubai, Sharjah is finally getting its chance to shine-thanks to its sheikh with a penchant for art and poetry, and his creative family.
The city is creating a reputation as the place in the UAE for creativity and a cutting-edge cultural agenda, and in recent years its cultural calendar has flourished, with events such as the Sharjah Biennial for contemporary arts, a newly launched graphic-design biennial, and the Islamic Arts Festival.
The Sharjah Art Foundation, led by Hoor Al Qasimi, is a hub for contemporary art in the region.
In addition to the Sharjah Art Foundation’s art spaces, and Sharjah Art Museum, he recommends the Maraya Art Centre and 1971 Design Space for contemporary art and design.
In 2018 the Serbian capital’s contemporary art biennale, October Salon, captured the attention of the international art community by hosting Yoko Ono and exhibiting works by Anselm Kiefer, Takashi Murakami and Olafur Eliasson, alongside those of Serbian artists including Nina Ivanovic, Aleksandra Domanović, Ivan Grubanov, and Maja Djordjevic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Success Of Streaming Has Been Great For Some, But Is There A Better Way?”

The Success Of Streaming Has Been Great For Some, But Is There A Better Way? Chastened since the turn of the millennium, the streaming revolution has now revivified the recording industry – at least, those at the top of it.
“Professionally, streaming has become crucial for the artists I work with, and it’s become such a big part of what we do in terms of marketing our campaign and making sure that people know that it’s on these streaming platforms,” says Katie Garcia, who owns Bayonet Records and does A&R for Secretly Group.
The tantalizing premise of streaming has been a success story in many ways.
As David Turner, a critic who writes the weekly streaming newsletter Penny Fractions and now works for SoundCloud, said in an interview with Slate last year: “So if you’re signed to a major label, for every stream you get you’re probably getting maybe 12 or 15% from that if you’re an artist.” It varies, of course, but Turner notes that while independent artists may not have to pay out to labels, they also don’t have access to the same kinds of resources – managing the nuts and bolts of an artistic career – as an artist who signed to one.
Earlier this year, news broke that a criminal investigation is underway against Jay Z’s high-fidelity streaming service, Tidal, following accusations from the Norwegian newspaper Dagens Naeringsliv that the platform had exaggerated listener streaming numbers for Kanye West’s The Life of Pablo and Beyoncé’s Lemonade “To the tune of several hundred million false plays… which has generated massive royalty payouts at the expense of other artists,” as they wrote in their report.
As streaming has become a dominant part of being an artist and a listener alike, musicians, activists and critics have also increasingly and vocally criticized the dominant streaming economy, and the purported inequalities that arise therein.
Spotify’s Will Page argues that the complexity of the user-centric model “Would arguably come at an increased cost – and the value of a stream would be more volatile, and less predictable, as well.” Others see it as perhaps a more ethical way to stream music, and the idea has picked up steam as of late: The French streaming service Deezer has been said to be exploring user-centric licensing.
In his proposal, Cole estimates that “The American Music Library would be able to offer somewhere in the neighborhood of $0.01 per Artist master stream and $0.0075 per Songwriter composition stream,” which is considerably higher than any payouts currently offered by major streaming services.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Taylor Swift, the Universal Backlot Fire, and Why Masters Are the Next Battleground in Music”

In 2000 his contract expired and he went back to “Prince,” and in 2014, the label gave him his masters as a condition of a new contract.
In a year saturated with controversies, Swift’s story is just one example of how the next showdown between artists and the music business is going to come down to the ownership of master recordings-and why the historical preservation of American music might depend on a new regime.
It’s hard to tell what the value of Big Machine would be without those masters, but in 2018, Variety reported that the label “Derived as much [as] 80% of its revenue from Swift’s music in recent years.” Swift, one of the label’s first signees, sold about 32 million records in the U.S. alone over her time with the label, and she is now one of the only stars who moves physical units in an era where that is near impossible.
In a Sunday post on Big Machine’s website, titled “So, It’s Time for Some Truth,” he described a potential new contract with Swift that would have allowed her to earn her masters back over time.
In her own post, Swift claimed that she was never given an opportunity to purchase her masters before the company was acquired by Braun.
In theory, labels say they can’t be profitable without owning the masters.
Only since 2013 have artists who released music in the 1970s been able to ask for their masters, and when they started, panic ensued among the major labels.
On June 11, the New York Times Magazine published an extensive exposé about a fire that tore through the Los Angeles Universal Studios backlot in 2008, damaging much of the storage space Universal Music Group kept on the site, including masters for up to 500,000 songs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Time-Based Media Conservation at Art Museums”

Glenn Wharton, for example, was trained as a sculpture conservator before moving into time-based media at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.
Time-based media refers to any work of art with duration, be it a five-minute video or a three-day piece of performance art, as opposed to traditional art like paintings or sculptures, which have physical, but not necessarily temporal, dimensions.
A Shifting IndustryIt wasn’t until the 1990s that museums like the Butler started acquiring time-based works like those by Paik; Jenny Holzer, who used LED lights to offer social commentary; and Bill Viola, who gravitated from kinetic sculptures to visual art using video recordings.
A Safe Repository Art conservation used to be simpler.
The most vexing time-based media conservation issue may be software-based art.
Once it’s set up, it can be done automatically any time a work of art is uploaded in a safe digital repository.
One of the hallmarks of time-based media is the concept of variable art, a term that came into the art lexicon in the early 2000s and also poses its own ethical issues.
The world of art conservation will have to keep up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Sell Led Zeppelin to a New Wave of Teenagers – Rolling Stone”

While Led Zeppelin fans were busy digging up their favorite old T-shirts and nostalgia-dusted tour photos in the months leading up to the band’s 50th anniversary this year, Tim Fraser-Harding’s team at Warner Music Group was drawing up a battle plan.
As Warner Music Group’s president of global catalog of recorded music, Fraser-Harding is in charge of all marketing strategies for the record company’s immense trove of non-contemporary songs – a collection that comprises some of the biggest hits of the last several decades, as well as all the duds, unreleased tracks and true obscurities.
Catalog marketing in the old music industry meant predictability, sluggishness and modest profit.
“Not everybody is getting out their phone to Shazam stuff all the time, so we’ve got to be able to find other ways to communicate about older music through marketing and fan engagement,” Fraser-Harding says.
“It’s a really interesting time at the moment in catalog Sometimes, it’s a question of how we make something out of nothing.” – Tim Fraser-Harding, Warner president of global catalog of recorded music.
“Music lovers and the industry pay a lot of attention to [our charts] because an artist’s Shazams represent the pure connection between the music and the fans, and what is happening in the zeitgeist of music in the very moment,” Jen Walsh, senior director of Shazam at Apple Music, tells Rolling Stone via email.
“A sync can really stick in people’s minds. The power of music in certain scenes is really significant,” licensing-focused music lawyer Erin Jacobson tells Rolling Stone.
Services like Apple Music, Amazon Music and Spotify are the most popular ways people listen to music, and their growth is still going.

The orginal article.