Summary of “Women Do Ask for More Money at Work. They Just Don’t Get It.”

Having grown up on go-get-’em-girls magazine articles and legal dramas fronted by high-powered career women, I just assumed that the next step for me was to stride into my boss’ office and ask for more money.
In a 2017 study titled Do Women Ask?, researchers were surprised to find that women actually do ask for raises as often as men – we’re just more likely to be turned down.
In 2003, Babcock co-authored an era-defining book called Women Don’t Ask.
Her book and the studies underpinning it have been cited ever since as evidence of women’s reticence to ask for more in the workplace.
Unlike other studies that have been carried out in this area, the Do Women Ask? researchers had more detailed data that revealed a crucial fact: Women are far more likely than men to work in jobs where salary negotiation isn’t necessarily possible, such as low-skilled hourly wage jobs or part-time roles.
Previous studies that reached the “Women don’t ask” conclusion often failed to account for certain types of jobs being dominated by one gender, focusing instead on the overall number of men or women who’d reported salary negotiations, which – given the number of women who work jobs with “Non-negotiable” salaries – skewed their findings.
The Do Women Ask? study, on the other hand, found that when comparing men and women who do similar jobs, women actually ask for raises at the same rates as men.
Now for the bad news: Both McKinsey’s research and the Do Women Ask? study found that while men and women ask for pay raises at broadly similar rates, women are more likely to be refused or suffer blowback for daring to broach the topic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Harvard Business Review”

How do you know it’s ripe for a breakthrough question? It’s probably a good candidate if it “Makes your heart beat fast,” as Intuit’s chairman and CEO, Brad Smith, put it to me.
The question burst methodology, by design, reverses many of those destructive dynamics by prompting people to depart from their usual habits of social interaction.
Not All Questions Are Created Equal Often, as I’m outlining the rules for a question burst, people ask what kinds of questions they should contribute-or how they can be confident that a question is a good one for further pursuit.
The more surprising and provocative the questions are, the better.
Is there some magic about precisely four minutes and 15 questions? No, but the time pressure helps participants stick to the “Questions only” rule.
After poring over survey data from more than 1,500 global leaders, I’m convinced that part of the power of the question burst lies in its ability to alter a person’s view of the challenge, by dislodging-for most-that feeling of being stuck.
Of course, many business leaders, recognizing the imperative for constant innovation, do try to encourage questions.
In a recent interview he said: “When you’re a student, you’re judged by how well you answer questions. Somebody else asks the questions, and if you give good answers, you’ll get a good grade. But in life, you’re judged by how good your questions are.” As he mentors people, he explicitly focuses their attention on making this all-important transition, knowing “They’ll become great professors, great entrepreneurs-great something-if they ask good questions.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 3 Minutes It Takes To Read This Will Improve Your Conversations Forever”

Following are the simplest tips I can give you to ask better questions, which will make your conversations more valuable to you and the people you engage with.
“Do you like movies?” You’ll get a more interesting answer if you ask, “Why do you like movies?”.
Example: If you ask a person why they like movies and they answer because it’s a good escape, you can follow up with, “Why do you feel like you need an escape?” If they answer because their job is stressful, you can follow up with “Why is your job stressful?” Repeated “Why” questions can turn a simple question about movies into a much deeper conversation.
When you ask a question, pay attention to the answer and ask a follow-up question about it to dig deeper.
If your goal is to learn from somebody, the easiest shortcut to do that is to ask them what they’ve learned.
The most interesting information is found in stories, so ask people to tell you one.
If you don’t fully understand something and want more clarity, ask a person how they would explain it to a kid or somebody with no experience on the subject.
“Am I missing anything? What’s the question nobody ever asks you but you wish they would?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tunde Wey Profile: The Chef Who Charges Black and White Customers Different Prices”

Because of his legal status, Wey was doing most of his traveling by Greyhound bus, thus avoiding airports.
Almost 20 hours into the trip, not far from Las Cruces, New Mexico, Wey was sitting in the back, zoning out and listening to music.
“Should I lie?” Wey asked himself as the cop got closer.
Standing there in the desert, Wey was suddenly overcome by chills.
Wey’s unpreparedness for the eventuality of being detained was, in part, his own brand of optimistic flakiness, but it was also a necessary accommodation faced by millions every day: It’s precisely because you can be picked up at any time, ending life as you know it in an instant, that it’s impossible to keep that fact constantly in mind without going mad. “What preparation could I do?” Wey says.
On Wey’s first night in detention, his biggest fear was physical violence.
“He’s going to get fucked in prison,” someone whispered to Wey about a fellow detainee.
Finally, after 20 days, Wey was brought before a judge who would decide whether he would be allowed to post bond while awaiting a hearing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Talk to an Employee Who Isn’t Meeting Their Goals”

It wasn’t so much Josh’s underperformance that was troubling Aaron – he was worried about telling Josh that he wasn’t meeting his goals.
Josh had been his colleague not long ago, and he didn’t think Josh had ever been told to improve his results.
Josh’s response would then inform Aaron’s next steps.
Doing so would prevent Aaron from being the bad guy, give him valuable information about how aligned they were about Josh’s performance, and demonstrate to Josh that Aaron wanted to partner with him rather than pass judgment.
We then crafted a plan for his conversation with Josh.
Aaron explained to Josh that the completion rate of his experiments was a key metric.
When Aaron asked Josh to evaluate himself, Josh told him he had been struggling to meet his goals and wasn’t surprised Aaron wanted to talk to him.
Aaron managed what could have been a very uncomfortable conversation and was able to collaborate with Josh to get his performance back on track.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Biggest Wastes Of Time We Regret When We Get Older”

When I look back, my biggest time regrets aren’t spending too much time on Twitter or mismanaging my daily tasks.
Not only did I look like an arse, I could’ve also saved a fair amount of time that day by simply asking my boss what he meant.
Like a lot of people, I made some common bad decisions that wasted both my time and the time of the person I was with.
Every time the thought comes back, simply remind yourself that you have already been forgiven, so there’s no reason to feel bad anymore.
It’s easy to waste time worrying about other people, too.
Don’t get me wrong – your friends and loved ones mean a lot to you, and you want to spend time nurturing them.
Regret is another big waste of time, so there’s no point in beating yourself up over these.
The sooner you learn from them the sooner you can free up your time and energy to live the life you want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Your Meetings Stink-and What to Do About It”

Multiple employees described his meetings as “a time suck.” They complained that he asked them to meet too often, allowed a few people to dominate conversations, and failed to create an environment where attendees really wrestled with ideas and engaged in critical thinking.
A telephone survey of more than 1,300 managers found that while 79% of them said that meetings they initiated were extremely or very productive, only 56% said the same about meetings initiated by others-clear evidence of an “I’m not the problem” attitude.
Additional research provides insight into why: In a study with Jiajin Tong of Peking University, I found that the attendees who are the most active are the ones who feel that meetings are the most effective and satisfying.
Meetings can efficiently bring together ideas and opinions and allow people to do their jobs in a more coordinated and cooperative manner.
What seemed to energize people? What could you do in future meetings to encourage that kind of engagement?
In addition to these routine scans, check in periodically with people who attend your meetings.
Because people often experience meetings as interruptions-taking them away from their “Real work”-the leader’s first task is to promote a sense of presence among attendees.
Some attendees felt that meetings were still longer than justified by their agendas; discussions sometimes rambled.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Better Brainstorming”

Brainstorming for questions, not answers, wasn’t something I’d tried before.
Brainstorming for questions rather than answers makes it easier to push past cognitive biases and venture into uncharted territory.
Over the years I have tested variations of this brainstorming process-I now call it a “Question burst”-and collected and analyzed participant data and feedback to gauge what works best.
Brainstorming for questions makes it easier to venture into uncharted territory.
The more surprising and provocative the questions are, the better.
In a recent interview he said: “When you’re a student, you’re judged by how well you answer questions. Somebody else asks the questions, and if you give good answers, you’ll get a good grade. But in life, you’re judged by how good your questions are.” As he mentors people, he explicitly focuses their attention on making this all-important transition, knowing “They’ll become great professors, great entrepreneurs-great something-if they ask good questions.”
In my field experience, I’ve found that people become better questioners in environments where they’re encouraged to value creative friction in everyday work.
Research by management professors Andrew Hargadon of UC Davis and Beth Bechky of NYU shows that those volunteering ideas in such companies do not mindlessly spit back answers to the questions posed; they respectfully build on the comments and actions of others, considering “Not only the original question but also whether there is a better question to be asked.” As they do this over and over, new solutions emerge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 3 Minutes It Takes To Read This Will Improve Your Conversations Forever”

Following are the simplest tips I can give you to ask better questions, which will make your conversations more valuable to you and the people you engage with.
“Do you like movies?” You’ll get a more interesting answer if you ask, “Why do you like movies?”.
Example: If you ask a person why they like movies and they answer because it’s a good escape, you can follow up with, “Why do you feel like you need an escape?” If they answer because their job is stressful, you can follow up with “Why is your job stressful?” Repeated “Why” questions can turn a simple question about movies into a much deeper conversation.
When you ask a question, pay attention to the answer and ask a follow-up question about it to dig deeper.
If your goal is to learn from somebody, the easiest shortcut to do that is to ask them what they’ve learned.
The most interesting information is found in stories, so ask people to tell you one.
If you don’t fully understand something and want more clarity, ask a person how they would explain it to a kid or somebody with no experience on the subject.
“Am I missing anything? What’s the question nobody ever asks you but you wish they would?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Impressive Questions to Ask in an Interview 2018”

As someone who has interviewed probably thousands of job candidates in my career, I’ve long been surprised by how many people don’t ask good questions when their interviewer gives them the opportunity.
A surprising number of candidates don’t have many questions at all, or simply use the time to try to further pitch themselves for the job.
So here are the ten best questions to ask in an interview when it’s your turn to ask the questions – to both impress your potential employer and help you get useful insights into whether or not this is the right job for you.
Initially, you might think that the job description already laid this out, but it’s not uncommon for a job description to be the same one an employer has been using for the last ten years, despite the job having changed significantly during that time.
You might find out that while the job posting listed 12 different responsibilities, your success really just hinges on 2 of them, or that the posting dramatically understated the importance of 1 of them, or that the hiring manager is battling with her own boss about expectations for the role, or even that the manager has no idea what success would look like in the job.
A job candidate asked me this question years ago, and it might be the strongest question I’ve ever been asked in an interview.
Sometimes people use their turn to ask questions in an interview solely as an additional chance to try to impress their interviewer – asking questions designed to reflect well on them rather than questions designed to help them figure out if the job is even right for them in the first place.
If you’re just focused on getting the job and not on whether it’s the right job for you, you’re in danger of ending up in a job where you’re struggling or miserable.

The orginal article.