Summary of “Rewriting the NFL’s Positional Lexicon”

The fullback, halfback, and quarterback designations all trace back to American football’s progenitor, where each position specified where a player lined up behind the scrum.
Many outside linebackers play up on the line of scrimmage, wide receivers no longer only play out wide, and tight ends line up tight, on the end, less often than ever.
New de facto positions have emerged, and many of the old positions have become hybridized - think slot receivers, nickel corners, safety-linebackers, versatile pass rushers that play both inside and outside, dynamic tight ends that line up everywhere in the formation and run routes just as well as receivers, and running backs that do it all.
Most receivers line up all over the field these days, moving from the X spot one play to the Z position the next.
Running Back/Receiver Hybrid Rook Football is often compared to chess, a game that requires a complex strategy before a player begins moving his or her pieces around the board.
The required skill set at the position differs from a traditional outside cornerback - nickel corners play closer to the middle of the field, which means they must be ferocious enough to mix it up in the run game and take on blocks from offensive linemen or fullbacks, yet shifty and agile enough to cover extremely quick pass catchers running two-way option routes in space.
None play in the same scheme, but designations aside, their roles as undersized midlevel players are all pretty similar: All three must bring enough power to take on blocks and tackle ballcarriers in the run game while, at the same time, possessing enough speed to blitz from any angle or run with tight ends and backs in coverage.
Sure, the former often play standing up, and the latter rush from a three-point stance - and yeah, there’s some differences between guys that play on the strong side and weak side spots.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A comprehensive guide to the new science of treating lower back pain”

She went on to write Crooked: Outwitting the Back Pain Industry and Getting on the Road to Recovery, an incredible tale of back pain and its treatment, published last May. The big takeaway: Millions of back patients like Ramin are floundering in a medical system that isn’t equipped to help them.
Mainstream medicine has failed people with chronic back pain Lower back pain is one of the top reasons people go to the doctor in the US, and it affects 29 percent of adult Americans, according to surveys.
“Our best understanding of low back pain is that it is a complex, biopsychosocial condition – meaning that biological aspects like structural or anatomical causes play some role but psychological and social factors also play a big role,” Roger Chou, a back pain expert and professor at Oregon Health and Science University, summarized.
Moving is probably the most important thing you can do for back pain When back pain strikes, your first instinct may be to avoid physical activity and retreat to the couch until the pain subsides.
There are two recent Cochrane reviews on spinal manipulation for low back pain: one focused on people with acute pain and the other on chronic pain.
The 2011 review on chronic low back pain found that spinal manipulation had small, short-term effects on reducing pain and improving the patient’s functional status – but this effect was about the same as other common therapies for chronic low back pain, such as exercise.
The Cochrane systematic review on massage for low back pain looked at 25 trials on massage and, like AHRQ, found short-term improvements in pain and function for both subacute and chronic low back pain but a very mixed evidence base.
“Chronic lower back pain is very prevalent, and we know some people with chronic lower back pain have used opioids for it,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secret Life of Pain”

Out of options, I joined the other no-hopers at Mayo’s pain rehabilitation center.
There, chronic pain, unlike the acute variety, was treated as a malfunction in perception, whether or not an ongoing physical cause had been identified.
The brain becomes addicted to dramatizing pain, they said; and the more you feed it, the stronger the addiction.
So don’t dwell on the pain, and don’t try to fix it – no props, no pills.
The more I learned about chronic pain, the more sense it made.
Studies have shown, for example, that people can develop a general hypersensitivity to pain after an injury – a condition called central sensitization – that can persist long after the injury has healed.
For me, buying into the Mayo pain program meant giving up my braces and straps and, with the greatest reluctance, my sitting cushion.
My wife tells me I sit “Like a champ,” but we avoid talking about how the pain still shadows me, though at a greater distance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MMQB: Cardinals RB David Johnson, Stephon Gilmore, more NFL notes”

Ninety nine percent of all NFL players are explicitly not dumb.
I asked Johnson if, growing up, he would he have believed that one day he’d be in the NFL and running a bread and butter play that hinged on the blocks he gets from, of all people, superstar wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald?
He said: “I’m definitely going to have to say I feel like I should be number one. If there’s a player in the NFL who doesn’t feel that way, they definitely should not be in the NFL. I feel like I should be number one, especially with the season I had last year, helping out the team. And I still have a lot of room to improve.”
SMARTER FOOTBALL: A series examining the cerebral side of the sport, including technology, analytics, how a brainy linebacker prepares and just what goes into a typical NFL play.
NFL players don’t grow as a film student on their own.
” Clark, who now works as an analyst for ESPN, works with a handful of NFL players, watching their tape and providing feedback, and when possible, training with the guy.
BREAKING DOWN THE NUANCES OF AN NFL PLAY: James Urban, one of the league’s most respected assistants, with a lesson in play design.
The difference? Rodgers still makes plays, even on the snaps where he misses plays.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The $100 Billion per year back pain industry is mostly a hoax, says investigative journalist Cathryn Jakobson Ramin”

“People in pain are poor decision-makers,” says the investigative journalist Cathryn Jakobson Ramin, author of a new book, Crooked: Outwitting the Back Pain Industry and Getting on the Road to Recovery.
Millions such bad decisions, she argues, have fueled a $100-billion-per-year back pain industry in the US-one that’s largely selling Americans wrong and even dangerous responses to back discomfort.
About 80% of Americans are expected to suffer from at least one episode of lower back pain in their lifetime, and millions with chronic pain are already lost in the industry, subjected to pseudo-interventions, or taking unnecessary and addictive opioids like Vicodin or Oxycontin, then doubling down on the drugs as their tolerance and the pain escalates.
It’s hard to choose one data point from Crooked that lays bare all the misrepresentation and snake oil in the back pain industrial complex, but a few key statistics that Ramin has collected stand out.
As Ramin writes in Crooked, “The ambiguity inherent in diagnosing back pain makes it possible for surgeons to do practically anything they want.”
Ramin wasn’t fully aware of spinal surgery’s poor rates of success when she decided to see a back surgeon for her own chronic back and leg pain nearly a decade ago.
Doctors are now advised not to turn to pain medication for garden variety back pain, but for years, we know too well, powerful painkillers, whose drug companies spent millions on marketing, were over-prescribed for back pain, arthritis and other conditions, creating an environment that made the drugs easy for anyone to access, and led to today’s opioids crisis.
Surgery has been outed as, for many patients, “Useless.” When, in early 2017, the American College of Physicians issued new guidelines saying that strong opioids such as Vicodin and Oxycontin should only rarely be prescribed for nonspecific back pain, reporters helped get the word out, while calling out the back pain businesses for their role in the current opioid crisis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Vince Young: Inside Texas star’s NFL fall, CFL comeback”

Eleven years removed from winning the national championship at Texas, 40 months after he filed for bankruptcy, Young spends his nights in Birch Hall, collapsing after long workouts onto a twin bed.
In Austin, Young is still the celebrity deemed by his Longhorns coach, Mack Brown, “Obviously one of the best to ever play college football.” He’s still the guy the Titans plucked with the No. 3 pick in 2006, who won Offensive Rookie of the Year, reached two Pro Bowls and went 31-19 as an NFL starter.
As Young’s celebrity skyrocketed, he found a mentor in Steve McNair, an NFL star with a sterling reputation.
Young would earn the league’s Comeback Player of the Year honors in 2009 by taking over the 0-6 Titans and leading them to an 8-8 finish.
The process of righting his finances took Young three years, and in that time he heard from interested CFL and Arena league squads-but not a single NFL franchise.
. in the CFL. Come again? With a contract that would pay just over $100,000 per season, Steinberg had the same question as everyone else: Why? Finishing his career as a CFL backup, an utterly unremarkable -ending-was that any better than getting canned by the lowly Browns? “Yes,” Young answered, and Steinberg, at that point, bought in.
It’s late June and Vince Young is back in Austin, his comeback having ended on a routine play when he was scrambling under pressure.
For all the skepticism that followed him to Canada, Young remains consistent in his messaging: He came back because he loved the game, he says, and he wanted to play free of the mess that he believes ended his NFL career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Race Ipsa Loquitur”

It took me 2 years to run a “Regular” length Spartan Race, which happened to be the Spartan Race World Championships.
I spent the week leading up to the race in a walking boot, dodging anyone who might see me in it, only taking it off for the race, and hiding it in my luggage.
Podiums are meaningless if you spend the weeks leading up to a race an absolute miserable human being.
There will come a day when I’m no longer able to race, and if I destroy everything else in my life in the meantime to be singularly fixated on that goal, then what will I have left?
So in deciding to race again, I vowed to myself that this season and this year is a new challenge – different from any one I’ve tackled in the past.
I’m racing to see if I can race like I did in the early days of the sport – with passion, gratitude, and a perspective on things that really matter in life.
I finally put together WHY that is: because the longer the race gets, the more the race is about others.
If you are sending good vibes and well wishes to me before races, don’t tell me “Good luck” or “Kick ass” or “I hope you win,” – instead, please tell me to “Have fun.” And if you catch me after a race, give me a hug, hand me a beer, and tell me about your day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

If you’ve got back pain, yoga may be the last thing you feel like doing.
After 12 weeks of a gentle, beginner-level yoga program, people in a recent study had as much pain relief as those who did physical therapy sessions.
The participants weren’t experienced yogis, either: they were 320 people with back pain who lived in the Boston area, racially diverse and mostly low-income.
They didn’t have back injuries, just a nagging pain that doctors couldn’t explain, possibly related to a lack of strength and flexibility.
They went to an hour-long yoga class every week, and were assigned to practice for 30 minutes on their own every day they didn’t have class.
Before the yoga program, 70 percent of participants were using pain medication.
This yoga program doesn’t work miracles, but it does seem to help.
If you have back pain, get it checked out, but it’s good to know that yoga might be able to help.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Back Pain Got You Down? Yoga Is A Good Alternative To Physical Therapy”

If you’re tired of popping pain medicine for your lower back pain, yoga may be a good alternative.
New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as safe and effective as physical therapy in easing pain.
The yoga protocol was developed by researchers at Boston Medical Center with input from yoga teachers, doctors and physical therapists.
The group recommends that people with back pain should avoid pain medicines if possible, and instead opt for alternatives such as tai chi, yoga and massage.
As we’ve reported, those guidelines are aimed at people with run-of-the-mill back pain, rather than pain due to an injury or other diagnosed problem.
The participants in the yoga and physical therapy groups had about the same amount of improvement in pain and functioning over time.
At the end of three months, when the yoga classes were wrapping up, the percentage of yoga and PT participants still taking pain medication had dropped to about 50 percent.
Saper says he chose to compare the effects of yoga with physical therapy because “PT is the most common referral that physicians make for patients with back pain. It’s accepted, it’s reimbursed, and it’s offered in most hospitals.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Those who leave home, and those who stay”

Putting those sentences next to each other implies there is something wrong with people who don’t leave home.
There’s nothing wrong with people who want to stay close to their family and friends – people who “Really value kinship and close ties,” as Cromartie put it.
The responses showed very little demographic difference between people who left and people who stayed – even along partisan lines.
It paints the picture of people who are so insular that they won’t leave their hometown, even when economic conditions are subpar.
He told me, “There is a value judgment often made with people who don’t leave their hometown – that there’s something wrong with that decision. Sometimes people don’t have opportunity to leave.”
It shows people in their late teens and early 20s are the most likely to migrate – and they generally leave their smaller towns and suburbs to live in the urban core, whether for school or work.
The people who go back home One way to think about leaving home is that it puts you in a position to accrue more economic and intellectual resources.
So the primary way non-urban towns benefit from those resources is when people come back home.

The orginal article.