Summary of “MMQB: Cardinals RB David Johnson, Stephon Gilmore, more NFL notes”

Ninety nine percent of all NFL players are explicitly not dumb.
I asked Johnson if, growing up, he would he have believed that one day he’d be in the NFL and running a bread and butter play that hinged on the blocks he gets from, of all people, superstar wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald?
He said: “I’m definitely going to have to say I feel like I should be number one. If there’s a player in the NFL who doesn’t feel that way, they definitely should not be in the NFL. I feel like I should be number one, especially with the season I had last year, helping out the team. And I still have a lot of room to improve.”
SMARTER FOOTBALL: A series examining the cerebral side of the sport, including technology, analytics, how a brainy linebacker prepares and just what goes into a typical NFL play.
NFL players don’t grow as a film student on their own.
” Clark, who now works as an analyst for ESPN, works with a handful of NFL players, watching their tape and providing feedback, and when possible, training with the guy.
BREAKING DOWN THE NUANCES OF AN NFL PLAY: James Urban, one of the league’s most respected assistants, with a lesson in play design.
The difference? Rodgers still makes plays, even on the snaps where he misses plays.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The $100 Billion per year back pain industry is mostly a hoax, says investigative journalist Cathryn Jakobson Ramin”

“People in pain are poor decision-makers,” says the investigative journalist Cathryn Jakobson Ramin, author of a new book, Crooked: Outwitting the Back Pain Industry and Getting on the Road to Recovery.
Millions such bad decisions, she argues, have fueled a $100-billion-per-year back pain industry in the US-one that’s largely selling Americans wrong and even dangerous responses to back discomfort.
About 80% of Americans are expected to suffer from at least one episode of lower back pain in their lifetime, and millions with chronic pain are already lost in the industry, subjected to pseudo-interventions, or taking unnecessary and addictive opioids like Vicodin or Oxycontin, then doubling down on the drugs as their tolerance and the pain escalates.
It’s hard to choose one data point from Crooked that lays bare all the misrepresentation and snake oil in the back pain industrial complex, but a few key statistics that Ramin has collected stand out.
As Ramin writes in Crooked, “The ambiguity inherent in diagnosing back pain makes it possible for surgeons to do practically anything they want.”
Ramin wasn’t fully aware of spinal surgery’s poor rates of success when she decided to see a back surgeon for her own chronic back and leg pain nearly a decade ago.
Doctors are now advised not to turn to pain medication for garden variety back pain, but for years, we know too well, powerful painkillers, whose drug companies spent millions on marketing, were over-prescribed for back pain, arthritis and other conditions, creating an environment that made the drugs easy for anyone to access, and led to today’s opioids crisis.
Surgery has been outed as, for many patients, “Useless.” When, in early 2017, the American College of Physicians issued new guidelines saying that strong opioids such as Vicodin and Oxycontin should only rarely be prescribed for nonspecific back pain, reporters helped get the word out, while calling out the back pain businesses for their role in the current opioid crisis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Vince Young: Inside Texas star’s NFL fall, CFL comeback”

Eleven years removed from winning the national championship at Texas, 40 months after he filed for bankruptcy, Young spends his nights in Birch Hall, collapsing after long workouts onto a twin bed.
In Austin, Young is still the celebrity deemed by his Longhorns coach, Mack Brown, “Obviously one of the best to ever play college football.” He’s still the guy the Titans plucked with the No. 3 pick in 2006, who won Offensive Rookie of the Year, reached two Pro Bowls and went 31-19 as an NFL starter.
As Young’s celebrity skyrocketed, he found a mentor in Steve McNair, an NFL star with a sterling reputation.
Young would earn the league’s Comeback Player of the Year honors in 2009 by taking over the 0-6 Titans and leading them to an 8-8 finish.
The process of righting his finances took Young three years, and in that time he heard from interested CFL and Arena league squads-but not a single NFL franchise.
. in the CFL. Come again? With a contract that would pay just over $100,000 per season, Steinberg had the same question as everyone else: Why? Finishing his career as a CFL backup, an utterly unremarkable -ending-was that any better than getting canned by the lowly Browns? “Yes,” Young answered, and Steinberg, at that point, bought in.
It’s late June and Vince Young is back in Austin, his comeback having ended on a routine play when he was scrambling under pressure.
For all the skepticism that followed him to Canada, Young remains consistent in his messaging: He came back because he loved the game, he says, and he wanted to play free of the mess that he believes ended his NFL career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Race Ipsa Loquitur”

It took me 2 years to run a “Regular” length Spartan Race, which happened to be the Spartan Race World Championships.
I spent the week leading up to the race in a walking boot, dodging anyone who might see me in it, only taking it off for the race, and hiding it in my luggage.
Podiums are meaningless if you spend the weeks leading up to a race an absolute miserable human being.
There will come a day when I’m no longer able to race, and if I destroy everything else in my life in the meantime to be singularly fixated on that goal, then what will I have left?
So in deciding to race again, I vowed to myself that this season and this year is a new challenge – different from any one I’ve tackled in the past.
I’m racing to see if I can race like I did in the early days of the sport – with passion, gratitude, and a perspective on things that really matter in life.
I finally put together WHY that is: because the longer the race gets, the more the race is about others.
If you are sending good vibes and well wishes to me before races, don’t tell me “Good luck” or “Kick ass” or “I hope you win,” – instead, please tell me to “Have fun.” And if you catch me after a race, give me a hug, hand me a beer, and tell me about your day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

If you’ve got back pain, yoga may be the last thing you feel like doing.
After 12 weeks of a gentle, beginner-level yoga program, people in a recent study had as much pain relief as those who did physical therapy sessions.
The participants weren’t experienced yogis, either: they were 320 people with back pain who lived in the Boston area, racially diverse and mostly low-income.
They didn’t have back injuries, just a nagging pain that doctors couldn’t explain, possibly related to a lack of strength and flexibility.
They went to an hour-long yoga class every week, and were assigned to practice for 30 minutes on their own every day they didn’t have class.
Before the yoga program, 70 percent of participants were using pain medication.
This yoga program doesn’t work miracles, but it does seem to help.
If you have back pain, get it checked out, but it’s good to know that yoga might be able to help.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Back Pain Got You Down? Yoga Is A Good Alternative To Physical Therapy”

If you’re tired of popping pain medicine for your lower back pain, yoga may be a good alternative.
New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as safe and effective as physical therapy in easing pain.
The yoga protocol was developed by researchers at Boston Medical Center with input from yoga teachers, doctors and physical therapists.
The group recommends that people with back pain should avoid pain medicines if possible, and instead opt for alternatives such as tai chi, yoga and massage.
As we’ve reported, those guidelines are aimed at people with run-of-the-mill back pain, rather than pain due to an injury or other diagnosed problem.
The participants in the yoga and physical therapy groups had about the same amount of improvement in pain and functioning over time.
At the end of three months, when the yoga classes were wrapping up, the percentage of yoga and PT participants still taking pain medication had dropped to about 50 percent.
Saper says he chose to compare the effects of yoga with physical therapy because “PT is the most common referral that physicians make for patients with back pain. It’s accepted, it’s reimbursed, and it’s offered in most hospitals.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Those who leave home, and those who stay”

Putting those sentences next to each other implies there is something wrong with people who don’t leave home.
There’s nothing wrong with people who want to stay close to their family and friends – people who “Really value kinship and close ties,” as Cromartie put it.
The responses showed very little demographic difference between people who left and people who stayed – even along partisan lines.
It paints the picture of people who are so insular that they won’t leave their hometown, even when economic conditions are subpar.
He told me, “There is a value judgment often made with people who don’t leave their hometown – that there’s something wrong with that decision. Sometimes people don’t have opportunity to leave.”
It shows people in their late teens and early 20s are the most likely to migrate – and they generally leave their smaller towns and suburbs to live in the urban core, whether for school or work.
The people who go back home One way to think about leaving home is that it puts you in a position to accrue more economic and intellectual resources.
So the primary way non-urban towns benefit from those resources is when people come back home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An inside look at Kevin Durant’s first 3 hours as an NBA champion”

OAKLAND – Kyrie Irving missed a jumper with a minute left, Draymond Green grabbed the rebound and, with 55 seconds on the clock, Kevin Durant bent over in disbelief and staggered toward the ABC broadcast booth around midcourt, his back turned to the ongoing action.
So here are the details, the behind-the-scenes look at Kevin Durant’s first three hours as an NBA champion, filled with strange cameos, pure emotion and plenty of booze.
Five years back, it had been the other way around – a defeated Durant hugging LeBron on the court after LeBron’s first title.
Just a few seconds later, the court around Durant and LeBron had flooded with cameras and family members and NBA workers and random faces.
Kevin Durant waiting his turn in the press conference room, hyped but has to stay quiet as Kerr talks pic.
As Durant talked to Nichols, his security guard, Tom Aube, emerged from the locker room with Durant’s cell phone, which he hadn’t seen in an hour, and a huge wooden cigar box that had ‘Kevin Durant’ carved in cursive on the front.
As Durant was talking to Rapaport on the court, David West had stormed out of the locker room, down the tunnel and rumbled past them, determined to get a picture with Steve Smith, who was working live on the NBA TV set.
Durant finished up first, exiting the locker room at 11:33, his brother Tony behind him with Durant’s game-worn shoes in hand.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the back pain industry is taking patients for an unhealthy ride”

For the majority of us, it’s not a question of whether we’ll someday experience back pain; it’s a question of when.
They don’t prevent back pain; they don’t solve back pain.
Her new book, “Crooked: Outwitting the Back Pain Industry and Getting On the Road to Recovery,” explores what she found, while also telling the story of how she overcame her chronic suffering.
Ramin, who had ineffective minor surgery for her back pain, said the post-surgical woes of Tiger Woods and Golden State Warriors’ coach Steve Kerr serve as prime examples of what can go wrong with back surgery.
“If you see a chiropractor more than one or two sessions, you are wasting your time if you are being cracked, adjusted or walked over. Study after study after study has shown that long-term visits to chiropractors don’t help patients. They don’t prevent back pain; they don’t solve back pain.”
Ramin says, opioid painkillers don’t work well for people with back pain.
What Ramin calls “Posture mavens” rely on “Ergonomic smoke and mirrors” to fix back pain, Ramin says.
Two things: Exercise and changing the way you think about back pain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be a Lot Happier? Never Do Any of These 9 Things”

If you’re less than happy with your life – either personally or professionally – the problem isn’t education, upbringing , a lack of opportunities, being held back by other people, or even bad luck.
Infighting, positioning, trying to look better by making other people look worse-playing politics can help get you ahead. But if you win by politics, you ultimately lose, because political success is based on the impulses, whims, and caprices of other people – other people you don’t even like.
Almost immediately, people will talk about you – and not in a nice way.
The only way to keep people from being snide, disparaging, or judgmental is to say and do what everyone else does.
See the fact that people are talking about you as a sign you’re on the right track – your track.
The world is full of people who pivot – even though pivot is sometimes just a fancy word for “Give up.”
There will always be people who are smarter, more talented, better connected, and better funded.
Many people try to collect jobs and experiences in pursuit of crafting a “Winning” CV. But that’s backward.

The orginal article.