Summary of “How We Got From Doc Brown to Walter White”

Westworld, Orphan Black, Masters of Sex, CSI, Bones, House, The Big Bang Theory, and several others have all written scientists as diverse and complex humans who have almost nothing in common with the scientists I saw in the 1980s movies I watched as a kid.
As a result, scientists on screen have evolved from stereotypes and villains to credible and positive characters, due in part to scientists themselves, anxious to be part of the action and the public’s education.
Scientists were smart and rational, the report noted, but of all the occupational roles on TV, scientists were the least sociable.
“We know we need scientists to fix up the mess we’re making of the planet. If there’s any hope at all, it has to come from scientists who monitor the risk and are able to find ways to overcome that risk. Whereas before, scientists were seen as part of the risk.”
Eight years after Doc Emmett Brown sent his mad invention traveling through time in Back to the Future, scientists in Jurassic Park enthralled visitors with creatures from the past.
Although Doc Brown’s chaotic goofiness was still acceptable for scientist characters in 1985, the paleontologists in Jurassic Park were held to a much higher standard.
In 2008, the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, having long taken note of the good and not-so-good portrayals of science and scientists in TV and film, set up the Science & Entertainment Exchange, a hotline that connects producers and screenwriters to scientists.
White’s blue meth business is also a reminder that while the overall framing of scientists on TV might have shifted toward the heroic, we can’t help but notice that Walter White is still a villain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Can’t Break Your Bad Habits”

I’ve tried many different ways to break my bad habits.
We try the weirdest things to get rid of our bad habits.
What’s A Bad Habit? To me, everything we do that doesn’t have a positive return is a bad habit.
We keep sticking to our bad habits because we can’t break them.
Advice About Habits Is Misunderstood What’s the best way to form a habit? I’ve been researching that question for more than a decade.
You Need A More Extreme Approach Look, I’m not saying that replacing bad habits with good habits is bad advice.
If you truly want to break your bad habits, go extreme on yourself.
Remember this: If you want to break your bad habits, BREAK THEM ALL AT THE SAME TIME. Go all in.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Forget Your Feelings”

Your Tricky Brain So we should just ignore our feelings and just do what is good/right all the time then, right? It’s simple.
Everything that’s screwed up in your life, chances are it got that way because you were too beholden to your feelings.
Feelings have a way of doing that, you know? They make you think you’re the center of the universe.
A lot of young people hate hearing this because they grew up with parents who worshipped their feelings as children, and protected those feelings, and tried to buy as many candy corns and swimming lessons as necessary to make sure those feelings were nice and fuzzy and protected at all times.
Your feelings cannot tell you what will be good for you in a week or a year or 20 years.
Why It’s Hard to Get Over Your Own Feelings Now, none of what I’m saying is really that surprising or new.
This is because we don’t just have feelings about our experiences, we also have feelings about our feelings.
There are four types of meta-feelings: feeling bad about feeling bad, feeling bad about feeling good, feeling good about feeling bad, and feeling good about feeling good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Joy of Watching Movies So Bad They’re Good”

I’ve known about the power of good/bad movies since I was a kid, but I was reminded of it just a few days after 9/11, when I went to a press screening of Mariah Carey’s unwitting classic Glitter.
I grew up in the ’60s with good/bad movies in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn because the nearby Walker Theater was where subpar films regularly came to crash land.
The movie wasn’t quite as unintentionally campy as Valley of the Dolls, but it still had enjoyably risible elements, with terrible casting and heavy handed lines like “Have you ever felt anything for anyone?” We ate it up and eventually splintered over to my own apartment, where the good/bad movie club runs to this day.
They’re sort of halfway between the Golden Razzies and the Oscars, as we honor movies and performances that were so vividly awful that they kept us amused.
Whether we stream our featured attractions, get them from Amazon, or tape them off movie channels, we’ve instinctively learned what makes a bad movie fun.
There isn’t the challenging “This is good for me” feeling that makes movies from Gandhi to Never Look Away seem like less than a romp in the park to sit through.
But the best kind of good/bad movie is one that doesn’t even know it’s bad. Enter The Room, the 2003 stinker that’s been called “The Citizen Kane of bad movies” and which proved that Tommy Wiseau is a quadruple non-threat – he can’t produce, direct, write, or act.
The exceedingly earnest love-triangle tragedy is done in by endless establishing shots of the Golden Gate Bridge, character touches that add nothing, and illogical characters, like Lisa’s mother, who chirps, “I definitely have breast cancer!” The movie was initially sold as a riveting melodrama, until audiences – such as they were – jeered in derision and it was rebranded “a dark comedy.” It’s hilarious all right – and became a midnight attraction and one of my movie club’s faves, as we all chant along with the rotten dialogue I’ll give Wiseau this much: Along with Ed Wood’s oeuvre, The Room has the distinction of having spawned a truly quality movie, in this case The Disaster Artist, with James Franco as the whack auteur.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Joe Biden: The Most Misunderstood Man in Washington”

“My kids went here. My oldest son, he’s the attorney general of the state of Delaware. We have a rugby team now? I want a picture! Ho ho ho, where’s the White House photographer? And where’s the class president? Can I have a class-president picture? Kate? Hello, Kate! I was class president, too, Kate! Folks, folks-“.
Without looking, he reaches out to Kate, the class president, grabs her hand.
He turns to Kate, leans down, kisses her forehead. “Anyway, I’ll get out of your hair.”
“He was, you know, made fun of,” says his sister, Valerie Biden Owens.
“One guy called him ‘Dash,’ signed the football to ‘dash dash dash Biden,’ because it was ‘J-J-J-Joe Biden.’ He worked hard. He practiced speaking. He learned cadence and rhythm. He memorized poems. He worked very hard.”
“Joe never appeals to the lowest common denominator. Look what’s happened in our political environment. If you don’t agree with me, you’re a bad person. You’re immoral. You want to screw with me. You’re bad, bad, bad. That’s the climate. And Joe-never.”
In those early campaign days, Biden and Val made it up as they went along.
Polls the summer before the election had Biden trailing by thirty points.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside J.J. Abrams’s Bad Robot, the coolest office in Hollywood”

3 minute Read. Taking up a cozy space of real estate on the ground floor of Bad Robot’s office is what’s simply known as the Workshop.
“J.J. was very deliberate about how he wanted the building created,” says Beth Waisler, Bad Robot’s Workshop Manager.
In true Bad Robot fashion, the workshop started as Abrams’s analog playground.
Initially, there were no plans for a Bad Robot online shop.
“Though the workshop exists as a way to express the way we think and to make things, we’re always thinking about when we expand that or what that would be,” says Katie McGrath, co-CEO of Bad Robot.
Bad Robot’s reception area envelops you with shelves of toys, games, and tchotchkes.
Abrams discovered the Beastlies in a comic book shop where Levings worked, reached out to her to see if she wanted to collaborate, and now her bug-eyed monsters scored a deal with Mattel and are in the works to become a TV, film, and/or game franchise.
Abrams bought an Ohio letterpress shop even before Bad Robot moved into its office.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Manage Your Mood”

Now, let me ask you another question: How is your day? I bet that you’re having a bad day if you’re in a bad mood, and a good day if you’re in a good mood.
That’s obvious, right? But here’s the thing; since it has such a big impact on the quality of our lives, why aren’t we managing our mood better? Because let’s face it, we shouldn’t let a bad mood ruin our day.
No matter how you live your life, at some point, you deal with annoying people or events that piss you off – things that ruin your mood.
So how do you avoid staying in a bad mood, caused by external things? And how do you even generate a good mood? Let’s discuss those two challenges.
Have you ever tried logging how often you’re in a bad mood? I did.
Like almost every process that’s focused on improving something bad, to manage a negative mood, we must become aware of our problem first.
Let’s say something happens that triggers a bad mood.
What separates the positive people from the negative people is that positive folks never STAY in a bad mood.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want To Make Better Decisions? Do This”

Do you ever look back on your decisions and think, “Why I on earth did I do that?”.
The funny thing is that bad decisions never seem like bad decisions in the moment.
You can do your best to avoid making dumb decisions.
You can fear decisions altogether because you might make mistakes.
“The difference between a good business and a bad business is that good businesses throw up one easy decision after another. The bad businesses throw up painful decisions time after time.”
The earlier and more you decide, the more chance that you make better decisions.
I often say that there are no right or wrong decisions – only decisions.
No matter what, you’re making decisions all the time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Science of Sibling Rivalry”

When a sibling relationship is bad it can be really bad-as in messing-up-your-life bad. Tense sibling relationships make people more likely to use substances and to be depressed and anxious in adolescence.
Sibling bullying makes a kid more likely to engage in self-harm as a teen and to become psychotic by age 18.
Whether a person models herself after her siblings or tries to distinguish herself has particularly important consequences.
One study found that siblings who felt positively about each other tended to achieve similar education levels, while those who spent unequal time with their dad and perceived unequal parental treatment had diverging educational fortunes.
Emulating your sibling can be a mistake, depending on what she’s up to: Girls are more likely to get pregnant in their teens and teenagers are more likely to engage in risky behavior if an older sibling did so first.
A study of more than 1 million Swedes found that one’s risk of dying of a heart attack spikes after a sibling dies of one, due not only to shared DNA but also to the stress of losing such a key figure.
Siblings seem like they’re just there only until they aren’t.
This article appears in the November 2018 print edition with the headline “The Science of Sibling Rivalry.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jeanette Winterson’s 10 Tips on Writing – Brain Pickings”

In 2010, inspired by Elmore Leonard’s classic 10 Rules of Writing published nearly a decade earlier, The Guardian invited some of the world’s most celebrated living authors to share their own dicta of the craft.
“Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied,” Zadie Smith counseled in the last of her ten.
Among the contributors was Jeanette Winterson – a writer of exquisite prose and keen insight into the deepest strata of the human experience: time and language, our elemental need for belonging, the power of art, how storytelling transforms us.
You may not be able to solve the problem, but turn aside and write something else.
If the work you are ­doing is no good, accept it.
If it was bad when it went in the drawer it will be just as bad when it comes out.
A lot of men still think that women lack imagination of the fiery kind.
For more hard-earned guidance on the writing process from other titans of literature, see Henry Miller’s eleven commandments of writing, Eudora Welty on the art of narrative, Susan Sontag’s advice to writers, and T.S. Eliot’s warm, wry letter of advice to a sixteen-year-old girl aspiring to be a writer.

The orginal article.