Summary of “How to Teach Your Kid Colors”

When my daughter was very young, we would read the toddler classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? In the story, the title character spots a red bird, a yellow duck, a blue horse, a green frog, a purple cat, a white dog, a black sheep and a goldfish.
It’s a lovely book, but now I know it’s probably not a great one for teaching a kid her colors.
We like to use color words “Prenominally,” meaning before nouns.
We’ll often say things like “The red balloon,” instead of using the postnominal construction, “The balloon is red.”
Say “The balloon is red,” for example, and you will have helped to narrow “Red-ness” to being an attribute of the balloon, and not some general property of the world at large.
This helps kids discern what about the balloon makes it red.
In her study, when kids heard the color words postnominally, their learning improved significantly.
The takeaway: Instead of saying “The red balloon,” say “The balloon is red.” Or change up the title of your favorite toddler book: “Brown Bear … oops, I mean bear who is brown.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Macy’s honors ‘Miracle on 34th Street’ with black-and-white balloon”

Before me stands a fully-inflated, 30-foot tall Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade balloon.
Piper’s referring to the fact that Harold, a slightly-smaller, but otherwise near pitch-perfect recreation of the parade balloon that appeared in the 1947 holiday classic Miracle on 34th Street, was certainly not black-and-white when the film’s producers captured it for the black-and-white film.
Highlighting one balloon from an immortal holiday film etched in the minds of multiple generations to celebrate its 70th birthday is surely a gimmick, or it would be if the histories of the film and parade weren’t so deeply intertwined.
The giant balloon was already part of the 1946 parade when it played a pivotal role in the film.
“Bringing back a balloon that hasn’t been seen in 70 years,” said Jordan Dabby, VP of partnership for Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, was a perfect way to honor the legacy.
Because Harold was a real Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade balloon, which was retired after the 1946 parade, they had the original plans.
“Harold is smaller than most of the parade’s far more elaborate, modern balloons – he’s called a ‘medium-size” balloon – but with still-Paul-Bunyan-esque proportions.
With just black, white, six shades of gray, and only the most basic shapes and lines, Harold is not Macy’s most attractive Thanksgiving Day Parade balloon.

The orginal article.