Summary of “How to Turn Your Leftover Vegetables Into Dinner”

As a depressed person who sometimes struggles to feel worthy of not starving to death, I have not been the same since I found her recipe for yachaejon, or spring vegetable pancakes.
These aren’t fluffy hotcakes folded with leftover steamed broccoli or whatever-they’re crunchy, salty, fried goodness that happens to be mostly made of vegetables.
It bears repeating that you can use just about any vegetables you like so long as at least one of them is an onion.
Feel free to scale the vegetables and flour/water up and down to suit your needs; as long as you end up with a similar ratio of vegetable to batter, it’ll be fine.
Set a wide, heavy-bottomed skillet over low heat while you prepare the vegetables.
Shred, julienne, ribbon or otherwise very finely slice your vegetables into a large bowl.
Continue heating the oil until it’s shimmering and just barely smoking, then add the vegetable batter to the skillet by the handful, allowing any excess liquid to drip back into the mixing bowl.
Depending on the vegetables you’ve chosen, you can take these little pancakes in any culinary direction you can think of.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Explaining the Unexplainable”

Lest you think that superstition is innate to batters, keep in mind that they are the same individuals who play other positions during the course of a game.
There’s something about batting that makes them prone to practice rituals.
In baseball, the batter can’t point to a direct correlation between tapping their foot on home plate and batting a double.
There seems to be something in the brain that, when confronted with no easily discernable pattern between one’s action and the outcome, seeks to forge a bridge and create a story that unites the two events-one an action that you can take, and therefore a reliable bet, and two, an event with a low probability of occurrence.
People, just like pigeons, are desperate to understand how the world works and map out its patterns.
Very broadly speaking, the more dopamine you have at work in your brain, the more patterns you see.
If there is too little dopamine, we don’t notice any patterns, and if there is too much, we perceive patterns that are not there.
Even if success or failure is written in the stars for the pigeon, the batter, and the Trobriander fisherman, their subjective experience persuades them that there is some way to sway the odds in their favor.

The orginal article.