Summary of “A List Of 8 Core Values I Live By”

Your core values are the result of your behavior.
We collectively underestimate the importance of values.
We think our values have everything to do with how we are perceived.
Since you have to live with yourself, your values should be one of the most important things in your life.
What if you don’t have values? Or what if you’ve never thought about setting your own core values? There are great risks involved with living without values.
Before you know it, you adopt the values of other people.
That’s why recently sat down to define my own personal core values to get things straight for myself.
Never copy someone else’s values or search for “Core values list” on Google.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Self-Reliance Is The Secret Sauce To Consistent Happiness”

Even though the purpose of life is not happiness in my opinion, being happy is still something that’s important to us.
When we become adults we should become self-reliant individuals, but funnily enough, we become even more dependent on others.
Otherwise, you become a dependent robot who can’t function by itself.
What you will find next are 6 lessons that can help you to become emotionally self-reliant.
How often do you think or feel something and you’re afraid of speaking it? We feel that we always have to agree with everything and everyone.
It’s always harder to speak your mind and to stand for something.
Once you separate yourself from everything in life, you become a passenger who tries to make the most out of every single minute.
If one thing falls through, don’t worry, do something else with your precious time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 6 Fundamental Skills Every Leader Should Practice”

There’s an old story about a tourist who asks a New Yorker how to get to the storied concert venue Carnegie Hall and is told, “Practice, practice, practice.” Obviously, this is good advice if you want to become a world-class performer – but it’s also good advice if you want to become a top-notch leader.
Over the past year we have been writing the HBR Leader’s Handbook – a primer for aspiring leaders who want to take their careers to the next level.
As part of our research for the book, we interviewed over 40 successful leaders of large corporations, startups, and non-profits to get their views about what it takes to become a leader.
As the office leader of McKinsey Korea, for example, he realized he had “a small playground to try new stuff” – and against all advice of local colleagues to be cautious and follow cultural norms, started writing a provocative newspaper column that challenged traditional ways of working among local businesses as their markets continued to globalize.
The leaders we talked with emphasized that these fundamental skills really matter.
Leaders often have a bias for action that keeps them from stepping back in this way – but it is the reflection on your practice that will help you improve.
If you don’t see the opportunities in your own organization, find them outside your professional work in a community group, a non-profit, or a religious organization, which are often hungry for leaders to step in and step up.
You’ll have become a leader, capable of rallying an organization of people around a meaningful collective goal and delivering the results to reach it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Key to Career Growth: Surround Yourself with People Who Will Push You”

We seek out expanded roles, more senior titles, extra money.
We overlook one very key piece of the learning puzzle: proactively surrounding ourselves with people who will push us to succeed in unexpected ways and, in so doing, build genuinely rich, purposeful lives of growth, excellence, and impact.
Conferences are a great place to get inspired, approach, and start a relationship with some of the people you’ve identified.
External contacts can potentially have the benefit of greater independence, a broader perspective with radically new horizons, as well as potential connections across both worlds which will benefit everyone.
Most truly great people live their lives with genuine passion and want to expand their missions.
These great companions who lead us to greater lives deserve our very best.
The combination of exercise and nature makes me particularly energetic, enthusiastic and positive – and therefore more willing to consider new possibilities.
Proactively seeking out and cultivating those who will help us become better versions of ourselves is, by a wide margin, the key for living a truly happy and meaningful life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A List Of 8 Core Values I Live By”

Your core values are the result of your behavior.
We collectively underestimate the importance of values.
We think our values have everything to do with how we are perceived.
Since you have to live with yourself, your values should be one of the most important things in your life.
What if you don’t have values? Or what if you’ve never thought about setting your own core values? There are great risks involved with living without values.
Before you know it, you adopt the values of other people.
That’s why recently sat down to define my own personal core values to get things straight for myself.
Never copy someone else’s values or search for “Core values list” on Google.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How feelings took over the world”

Rather than criticise people for a lack of self-control, how might we understand the historical transition that has turned feeling into such a potent political force?
The rise of psychology and psychiatry in the late 19th century brought mind and body into closer proximity to each other, demonstrating how our thoughts are influenced by nervous impulses and feelings.
Second, there are feelings in the sense of emotions.
Feelings are how we orient ourselves, while also providing a reminder of shared humanity.
Our capacity to feel pain, empathy and love is fundamental to how and why we care about each other.
The information feelings convey in the moment can conflict starkly with the facts that are subsequently established.
Feelings of disenfranchisement are not merely economic, but have acquired a bodily and existential dimension: people’s lives are being shaped by divergent health, life expectancy and encounters with physical and psychological pain.
Pessimism emanates most strongly from bodies that are ageing faster and suffering more – further evidence that we cannot tidily separate how things appear to our minds from how they feel to our bodies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Know If You’ll Be Successful”

I started seeing how many objectives I could complete in a single day, and how many days I could compete challenges in a row.2.
How could you ever become an Olympic Athlete if you didn’t at some point see it and believe it in your mind?
Carry A Notepad Everywhere”I take notes like some people take drugs. There is an eight-foot stretch of shelves in my house containing nothing but full notebooks. I trust the weakest pen more than the strongest memory, and note taking is - in my experience - one of the most important skills for converting excessive information into precise action and follow-up.” - Tim Ferriss, in the blogpost, How to Take Notes Like an Alpha-GeekYour mind can be like a well.
Face Your Pain, Or It Will Be Buried And Stunt Your Growth”If you don’t know how to control your emotional reactions and there’s a refractory period, and you let that emotional reaction linger for hours or days, it turns into a mood. So you say to someone, ‘What’s wrong with you?’ The person says, ‘I’m in a mood.’ Then you say, ‘Why are you in a mood?’ They say, ‘Well, this thing happened to me five days ago and I’m having one long emotional reaction.’ If you keep that refractory period going for weeks and months, you’ve developed a temperament. If you keep that same refractory period going on for years, it’s called a personality trait.” - Dr.
I know people who had rough experiences as teenagers who are still subconsciously playing out the same emotional experiences from that episode.
See How Much You Can Do In A Single Day”Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” - T. S. EliotEzra Taft Benson was a religious leader who simultaneously served as the 15th United States Secretary of Agriculture during both presidential terms of Dwight D. Eisenhower.
See How Much You Can Give In Your Relationships”You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want.” - Zig ZiglarWhen you’re driven to give and to serve, you become more empathetic and relevant.
In order to keep yourself sharp, you need to never stop pushing your boundaries, not matter how good you become.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Scientific Argument for Mastering One Thing at a Time”

Research has shown that you are 2x to 3x more likely to stick with your habits if you make a specific plan for when, where, and how you will perform the behavior.
Eventually, your new habit becomes a normal routine and the process is more or less mindless and automatic.
The habit is becoming fairly routine.
The most important thing to note is that there is some “Tipping point” at which new habits become more or less automatic.
The time it takes to build a habit depends on many factors including how difficult the habit is, what your environment is like, your genetics, and more.
You are 2x to 3x more likely to follow through with a habit if you make a specific plan for when, where, and how you are going to implement it.
Research has found that implementation intentions do not work if you try to improve multiple habits at the same time.
Research has shown that any given habit becomes more automatic with more practice.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Coming to Grips with the Implications of Quantum Mechanics”

Over the years, we have written extensively about why QM seems to imply that the world is essentially mental.
We are often misinterpreted-and misrepresented-as espousing solipsism or some form of “Quantum mysticism,” so let us be clear: our argument for a mental world does not entail or imply that the world is merely one’s own personal hallucination or act of imagination.
According to QM, the world exists only as a cloud of simultaneous, overlapping possibilities-technically called a “Superposition”-until an observation brings one of these possibilities into focus in the form of definite objects and events.
The problem is that the partitioning of the world into discrete inanimate objects is merely nominal.
The inanimate world is a single physical system governed by QM. Indeed, as first argued by John von Neumann and rearticulated in the work of one of us, when two inanimate objects interact they simply become quantum mechanically “Entangled” with one another-that is, they become united in such a way that the behavior of one becomes inextricably linked to the behavior of the other-but no actual measurement is performed.
As a matter of fact, peculiar statistical characteristics of the behavior of entangled quantum systems seem to rule out everything but consciousness as the agency of measurement.
Some then claim that entanglement is observed only in microscopic systems and its peculiarities are allegedly irrelevant to the world of tables and chairs.
What preserves a superposition is merely how well the quantum system-whatever its size-is isolated from the world of tables and chairs known to us through direct conscious apprehension.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What It Takes to Think Deeply About Complex Problems”

The problems we’re facing often seem as complex as they do intractable.
As Albert Einstein is often quoted as saying, “We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.” So what does it take to increase the complexity of our thinking?
Rather than certainty, modern leaders need to consciously cultivate the capacity to see more ­- to deepen, widen, and lengthen their perspectives.
Widening means taking into account more perspectives ­- and stakeholders – in order to address any given problem from multiple vantage points.
Early in childhood, we begin to develop an internal narrative about how the world works and what we think is true.
Think for a moment about one of your primary strengths.
Relentless demands and the pressure to respond rapidly undermine more complex thinking.
Scheduling this practice is a way of ensuring that I give complex issues time and attention that might otherwise be consumed by more urgent but less intellectually demanding and value-adding priorities.

The orginal article.