Summary of “The Lonely Work of Moderating Hacker News”

Hacker News readers who visit the site to learn how engineers and entrepreneurs talk, and what they talk about, can find themselves immersed in conversations that resemble the output of duelling Markov bots trained on libertarian economics blogs, “The Tim Ferriss Show,” and the work of Yuval Noah Harari.
“One of the things I’ve learned is that almost all of the generalizations are wrong. And I’ve learned this because people love to post generalizations about Hacker News to Hacker News.”.
In an Emacs file, Gackle collects a list of contradictory statements that people have used to describe Hacker News.
Gackle later told me that he sees frustration at work as part of the DNA of Hacker News.
For Gackle and Bell, moderating Hacker News has presented an opportunity for self-work.
N-gate, a satirical Web site with the slogan “We can’t both be right”, offers a weekly summary of Hacker News discussions, dubbed “Webshit weekly.” The N-gate entry about a Hacker News discussion of a Times article on the crashes of two Boeing 737 airliners, in Indonesia and Ethiopia, is typical.
The creation of Startup News was a response to Reddit’s Eternal September; some of the problems with which Gackle and Bell are grappling can be traced to a similar phenomenon at Hacker News.
A few weeks after meeting with Gackle and Bell, I checked Hacker News to see what commenters were saying about a Times story on the Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes’s antitrust work with the Federal Trade Commission.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My sordid Disneyland past: Confessions of a Magic Kingdom popcorn man”

My sordid Disneyland past: Confessions of a Magic Kingdom popcorn man – Los Angeles Times.
The last time I was in Disneyland I couldn’t wait to leave.
Galaxy’s Edge is the park’s biggest change since Disney California Adventure in 2001, and of all the addictions, including self-aggrandizement, that my generation bequeathed me, the one I can’t quit is Disneyland.
Many of my classmates didn’t have televisions yet, so a few bicycled to our house for the premiere of “Walt Disney’s Disneyland.” Our faces inches from the cyclops eye in the wooden Philco box, we watched Tinker Bell fly across the screen, sprinkling pixie dust, as Jiminy Cricket sang, “When You Wish Upon a Star.” Avuncular Walt invited us into his lair, promising “The Happiest Place on Earth.” Once inside the TV, we were enchanted by “The Disneyland Story.” All about a place that didn’t exist – yet.
To my mother’s consternation and my jubilation, Dad sold the store and we took Route 66 west to “Tomorrow’s City Today” – Lakewood, California – 1,995 miles closer to Disneyland than our southern Indiana home.
Between a vast variety of physical breakdowns, Tito helped us pass the cold, foggy San Francisco nights by acting out bizarre stories about his former part-time job at Disneyland as one of Snow White’s seven dwarfs.
Ahhhhhhh gradually standing, his little body shaking ahhhhhhhhhhh until a single leap straight up: chooooo! You didn’t need drugs to howl at his performance and be enchanted by his tales of backstage Disneyland.
All could escort anyone breaking the rules of Disneyland – drunks, spitters, kids who threw things from a gondola of the now-defunct Skyway – to the backstage Anaheim Police Department jail.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In 1974, They Gave The Nobel To Her Supervisor. Now She’s Won A $3 Million Prize”

Now She’s Won A $3 Million Prize Fifty years ago, Jocelyn Bell Burnell saw a blip in the data from a radio telescope she helped build.
The discovery of pulsars was so important that it won a 1974 Nobel Prize – for Hewish.
Fifty years after Bell Burnell noticed that blip in the red ink, her observation has earned her a very big award: a Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, which comes with a check for $3 million.
The Breakthrough Prizes, funded by Silicon Valley figures including Sergey Brin, Yuri Milner, and Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg, are the largest monetary science prizes in the world.
Previous winners of the prize include Stephen Hawking, scientists at CERN involved in the discovery of the Higgs boson, and physicists in the LIGO collaboration who detected gravitational waves.
Bell Burnell is donating her prize winnings to the U.K.’s Institute of Physics, where they will fund graduate scholarships for people from under-represented groups to study physics.
“I feel I’ve done very well out of not getting a Nobel prize,” she told the Guardian.
“If you get a Nobel prize you have this fantastic week and then nobody gives you anything else. If you don’t get a Nobel prize you get everything that moves. Almost every year there’s been some sort of party because I’ve got another award. That’s much more fun.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How brand new science will manage the fourth industrial revolution”

She heads the 3A Institute at the Australian National University, which was launched in September 2017 and is working out how we should respond to, and perhaps even direct, the fourth revolution.
They didn’t know how to shape the industries the engines could power, or how to house them, or about the safety systems they’d need.
With this in mind, Bell said that the fourth industrial revolution needs its own applied science, so that’s exactly what the 3A Institute is going to build – as the website puts it, “a new applied science around the management of artificial intelligence, data, and technology and of their impact on humanity”.
If autonomous systems are operating without prewritten rules, how do we stop them turning evil, as so many fictional robots do? How do different autonomous systems interact? How do we regulate those interactions? How do you secure those systems and make them safe? How do the rules change when the systems cross national boundaries?
“Does your car then have to be updated because of Brexit, and if so how would you do that?” Bell asked.
If autonomous vehicles are following rules, how are those rules litigated? Do the rules sit on the object, or somewhere else? If there’s some network rule that gets vehicles off the road to let emergency vehicles through, who decides that and how? If you have multiple objects with different rule sets, how do they engage each other?
As with computer science before it, the 3A Institute is developing a curriculum for this as-yet-unnamed new science.
How do you resolve the tension between the need to build and deploy accurate machine learning models fast, and the need to understand how those models work, what data they touch upon, and what are the implications? Immuta says data governance is the answer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the nature of cause and effect will determine the future of quantum technology”

Today we get an answer to this question, thanks to the work of Morgan Mitchell at the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology in Spain, along with dozens of collaborators and more than 100,000 experimenters around the world who have carried out a unique test of one of the most confounding predictions of quantum theory.
One of the curious features of quantum mechanics is that it allows quantum particles created at the same point in space and time to share the same existence.
In the late 1960s, the Bell test was beyond the capabilities of quantum physicists.
They have become routine in quantum optics labs and a key part of the protocols used in emerging technologies such as quantum cryptography.
The bits were then fed at a constant rate of 1,000 bits per second to labs all around the world that had agreed to perform a Bell test in various ways, using photons as the quantum particles, atoms, and even superconductors in myriad combinations.
That is good news for the many emerging quantum technologies that rely on Bell tests, such as quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography.
Quantum mechanics-and Bell tests in particular-blur the distinction between cause and effect.
It is 50 years since Bell put forward his controversial ideas, but Bell tests now lie at the heart of the emerging quantum technology revolution.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Gentleman’s Guide to the NBA: When Players Agree to Take Plays Off”

100 percent effort on 100 percent of plays would sap even the greatest of deities of their godly gifts and transform contests into stumbling slogs.
Typically, veterans propose the potential pact while lining up outside the paint, which is often how young players first hear of the tradition.
Most players question opponents about their intentions before committing.
Players might be cool with taking plays off, but nobody wants to be singled out for doing so by coaches the following day.
On offense, players will sometimes tip off their opponents mid-possession if they know the ball’s not coming their way.
Of course, not all players are as gentlemanly as others.
The prevalence of these sorts of handshakes offers some of the league’s more ruthless players the opportunity to deke relaxed opponents.
Then there are players like Sixers rookie Ben Simmons, who acknowledged not caring for treaties made between opponents.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Gentleman’s Guide to the NBA: When Players Agree to Take Plays Off”

100 percent effort on 100 percent of plays would sap even the greatest of deities of their godly gifts and transform contests into stumbling slogs.
Typically, veterans propose the potential pact while lining up outside the paint, which is often how young players first hear of the tradition.
Most players question opponents about their intentions before committing.
Players might be cool with taking plays off, but nobody wants to be singled out for doing so by coaches the following day.
On offense, players will sometimes tip off their opponents mid-possession if they know the ball’s not coming their way.
Of course, not all players are as gentlemanly as others.
The prevalence of these sorts of handshakes offers some of the league’s more ruthless players the opportunity to deke relaxed opponents.
Then there are players like Sixers rookie Ben Simmons, who acknowledged not caring for treaties made between opponents.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An artist is reimagining the UK’s national parks in the style of J.R.R. Tolkien’s maps”

Tolkien’s prose is aided by his beautiful maps of Middle-earth, which comes with simplified, beautiful forests, mountains, and typography that has set the standard for fictional cartography ever since.
That influence extends beyond just fantasy novels: an English artist is using Tolkien’s style to reimagine the UK’s national parks for his own beautiful maps.
After receiving positive feedback from friends, he thought about adapting the art style to some real world locations, such as the UK’s national parks.
To start his maps, Bell says that he works from an open source Ordnance Survey map, and begins drawing by hand.
Presently, Bell has adapted a handful of the UK’s national parks, as well as places like Oxford, London, Yellowstone National Park, and George R.R. Martin’s Westeros, and has begun offering them for sale on his site.
Once he’s done with England’s parks, he says that he’ll move on to converting the national parks of Wales, Scotland, and eventually, more of the US’s parks.
Bell isn’t the first artist to be inspired by Tolkien’s artwork: others have taken the style and adapted the real world to it, like Stentor Danielson, who drew up his own version of US cities a couple of years ago.
Bell chalks up the appeal of the style to a broad, cultural familiarity as generations of readers picked up the books or had them read to them as children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Taco Bell adds fries to menu: PHOTOS, REVIEW”

The fries are served with cheesy dipping sauce, or “Nacho style,” smothered in cheese, beef, sour cream, and more.
We taste-tested the fries, and found they were like nothing else fast-food chains are serving right now.
On Thursday, the fast-food chain added $1 nacho fries to the menu for a limited time.
Instead of taking the classic fast-food route, Taco Bell tops its fries with a spicy seasoning and serves them with a side of nacho cheese.
Customers can also order “Supreme” fries for $2.49 or the larger serving of “Bell Grande” fries for $3.49, served with even more toppings: beef, pico de gallo, nacho cheese, sour cream, and other add-ons like guacamole, bacon, and jalapeno peppers.
To see how Taco Bell’s new fries measure up to the competition, we tried them for ourselves.
They taste exactly how french fries from Taco Bell – and only Taco Bell – should taste.
Taco Bell’s fries are fairly hefty and a bit floppy – certainly less crisp than offerings at chains like McDonald’s.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alexander Graham Bell’s Secret to Greater Productivity”

Alexander Graham Bell possessed one of the most fertile and brilliant minds in modern history.
While your mileage in adopting these unconventional habits will vary, there was one unique method of Bell’s that might be more universally worth trying: using location-based prompts to prime your mind for certain tasks.
“There is a sort of telephonic undercurrent going on [in my mind] all the while,” the inventor told his wife Mabel, explaining that he had “Periods of restlessness when my brain is crowded with ideas tingling to my fingertips when I am excited and cannot stop for anybody.” During such times, Bell went without food or drink, and asked that no one, not even Mabel, disturb him, lest such interruptions burst the gossamer threads of his emerging ideas.
While Bell’s focus could be laser-like when he was chasing down a eureka moment, much of the time his mind was in fact quite scattered and distracted.
Unlike his fellow inventor, Thomas Edison, Bell even hated the work of commercializing his inventions – applying for patents and popularizing and improving that which he had already created.
To bring a little organization to his often fragmented thoughts, Bell came up with a method of using what we’ve chosen to dub “Location-based prompts.” “Convinced that his physical surroundings induced specific trains of thoughts,” his biographer explains, “He established particular workspaces for particular purposes.”
There’s actually some neuroscience that shows why Bell’s location-based prompt method can be effective.
Do what Bell would – experiment and see if it works for you.

The orginal article.