Summary of “How Technology Is Changing Our Reading Habits”

How is technology affecting the publishing industry?
About a decade ago, when Amazon introduced its first e-reader, publishers panicked that digital books would take over the industry, the way digital transformed the music industry.
It has definitely become a new way for readers to connect with authors and discover books, but it has probably also cut into the time that people spend reading.
Many new authors are skipping traditional publishers and use tech tools to go straight to self-publishing their own e-books or print books.
There have been a handful of massively successful self-published authors who have started their own publishing companies, and they’ve started to publish other “Self-published” authors.
In many parts of the country, Barnes & Noble is the only place people can buy books, and it’s still a beloved brand.
The store even looks like a 3-D version of the website, with book covers facing out and curated sections that reflect what’s popular with Amazon’s customers.
I’ll be curious to see how Indigo Books, the Canadian chain, will do here next year when it expands into the United States.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The diabolical genius of the baby advice industry”

I knew all these things – but what I didn’t yet understand was the diabolical genius of the baby-advice industry, which targets people at their most sleep-deprived, at the beginning of what will surely be the weightiest responsibility of their lives, and suggests that maybe, just maybe, between the covers of this book, lies the morsel of information that will make the difference between their baby’s flourishing or floundering.
So “Two or three” books became six, and 10, and eventually 23, all with titles that, even before the sleep deprivation set in, had begun to blur into one other: The Baby Book and Secrets of the Baby Whisperer and The Happiest Baby on the Block and Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child and The Contented Little Baby Book.
Such mysteries begin to disperse when you realise that baby advice isn’t only, or perhaps even mainly, about raising children.
From five or six months old, I learned, we could choose to let our baby cry himself to sleep for a few nights, which the Baby Trainers felt was essential if he were ever to learn to “Self-soothe”, but which the Natural Parents swore would cause lasting neurological damage.
Or we could respond within seconds to every cry, sharing our bed with our baby, resigning ourselves to years of multiple nighttime wakings for breastfeeding, all of which the Natural Parents felt was the least a loving mother ought to do, not to mention the instinctive thing all mothers had been hardwired to do – but which the Baby Trainers warned would lead to brain-dead parents unable to properly discharge their duties, plus a maladjusted child incapable of spending five minutes in a different room from them, and probably also divorce.
Not for the last time in the history of the baby advice industry, Liedloff turned her disdain for parenting experts into a successful career as one, publishing a 1975 book, The Continuum Concept, which urged American and European parents to embrace the laid-back ways of the Ye’kuana.
It sold healthily, but its greatest effect was undoubtedly in the influence it had on William Sears, a devout Christian paediatrician from Illinois who incorporated its message into his own childcare philosophy, coining the term “Attachment parenting” and achieving breakthrough success in 1992 with The Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know about Your Baby from Birth to Age Two, written with his wife, Martha.
The anthropological literature is littered with contemporary examples of baby-rearing practices that would appal both Baby Trainers and Natural Parents: among the Hausa-Fulani of west Africa, for example, there is a taboo against mothers making eye contact with their children; the Swazi of southern Africa sometimes don’t even name a baby until it is several months old.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The diabolical genius of the baby advice industry”

I knew all these things – but what I didn’t yet understand was the diabolical genius of the baby-advice industry, which targets people at their most sleep-deprived, at the beginning of what will surely be the weightiest responsibility of their lives, and suggests that maybe, just maybe, between the covers of this book, lies the morsel of information that will make the difference between their baby’s flourishing or floundering.
So “Two or three” books became six, and 10, and eventually 23, all with titles that, even before the sleep deprivation set in, had begun to blur into one other: The Baby Book and Secrets of the Baby Whisperer and The Happiest Baby on the Block and Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child and The Contented Little Baby Book.
Such mysteries begin to disperse when you realise that baby advice isn’t only, or perhaps even mainly, about raising children.
From five or six months old, I learned, we could choose to let our baby cry himself to sleep for a few nights, which the Baby Trainers felt was essential if he were ever to learn to “Self-soothe”, but which the Natural Parents swore would cause lasting neurological damage.
Or we could respond within seconds to every cry, sharing our bed with our baby, resigning ourselves to years of multiple nighttime wakings for breastfeeding, all of which the Natural Parents felt was the least a loving mother ought to do, not to mention the instinctive thing all mothers had been hardwired to do – but which the Baby Trainers warned would lead to brain-dead parents unable to properly discharge their duties, plus a maladjusted child incapable of spending five minutes in a different room from them, and probably also divorce.
Not for the last time in the history of the baby advice industry, Liedloff turned her disdain for parenting experts into a successful career as one, publishing a 1975 book, The Continuum Concept, which urged American and European parents to embrace the laid-back ways of the Ye’kuana.
It sold healthily, but its greatest effect was undoubtedly in the influence it had on William Sears, a devout Christian paediatrician from Illinois who incorporated its message into his own childcare philosophy, coining the term “Attachment parenting” and achieving breakthrough success in 1992 with The Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know about Your Baby from Birth to Age Two, written with his wife, Martha.
The anthropological literature is littered with contemporary examples of baby-rearing practices that would appal both Baby Trainers and Natural Parents: among the Hausa-Fulani of west Africa, for example, there is a taboo against mothers making eye contact with their children; the Swazi of southern Africa sometimes don’t even name a baby until it is several months old.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The reviewer’s fallacy: when critics aren’t critical enough.”

According to Rotten Tomatoes, 92 percent of critics liked the movie.
Viewers gave Daddy’s Home 2 a 59 rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and the critics an 18.
It would be tiresome for critics to constantly be counting the ways that the work under review is crap, nor would their editors and the owners of the publications they write for be happy with a consistently downbeat arts section.
As a friend of mine suggests, critics fall prey to a sort of hermeneutic Stockholm syndrome.
Inside Llewyn Davis got 93 from the critics and 74 from the public on Rotten Tomatoes.
Here’s the heart of the problem: The set of critics’ and audiences’ interests do not perfectly overlap but rather form a Venn diagram.
In the audience circle, the pressing question is, “Should I spend some number of the dollars I have to my name and the hours I have left on Earth on this thing?” Critics get in for free and by definition have to read or watch or listen to whatever’s next up.
Take last year’s Best Picture winner, Moonlight, which has a 98 critics’ and 79 audience score on Rotten Tomatoes, and which I haven’t seen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Most of us are too busy to be better’: the lazy person’s guide to self-improvement”

Books with titles such as The 10-Minute Millionaire, The 5-Minute Healer, 10 Minutes To Better Health and 10 Minutes A Day To A Better Marriage represent, if not a global revolution in self-improvement, at least a reliable publishing trend.
My first self-improvement guide is a new book called 15 Minutes To Happiness by Richard Nicholls.
My first thought is that 15 minutes sounds a lot, especially when somebody else is promising to make me a millionaire in 10, but Nicholls’ book is full of quick exercises interspersed with longer explanations of why and how they work.
So I’m done doing yoga in front of people, but a book called The 10 Minute Yoga Solution raises the possibility that I could get my joy in the privacy of my home, quietly and quickly.
The author, Ira Trivedi, makes a lot of bold claims: she says that 10 minutes of yoga a day will not just make me calmer and more physically fit, it will improve my eyesight, control unhealthy eating habits and cure a multitude of hair problems.
I like the sound of “Yoga for lazy people” and “Yoga for hangovers”, but for the moment I am concentrating on yoga for beginners: eight poses, 10 minutes in all.
The exercise takes 20 minutes from start to finish – too long.
Ten minutes of yoga is one thing, but when you add in a happiness exercise and the 12 minutes it takes me to listen to a 20-minute podcast, you’re talking about nearly a whole hour.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life Lessons From Chinese Children’s Books Differ From Those In The U.S.”

Life Lessons From Chinese Children’s Books Differ From Those In The U.S. : Goats and Soda How much can you tell about a country from its children’s books? Some psychology researchers decided to find out.
That’s a question that may occur to parents as their children dive into the new books that arrived over the holidays.
Ostensibly it’s about a cat that has an appetite for sloppy letters – “Written too large or too small, or if the letter is missing a stroke,” explains one of the researchers, psychologist Cecilia Cheung, a professor at University of California Riverside.
The underlying point is clear: “This is really instilling the idea of effort – that children have to learn to consistently practice in order to achieve a certain level,” says Cheung.
The book is one of dozens of storybooks from a list recommended by the education agencies of China, the United States and Mexico that Cheung and her collaborators analyzed for the study.
The book celebrates perseverance, of course – but also another value Cheung and her collaborators tracked: steering clear of bad influences.
“A little girl attempts to make a potion of happiness in a jar,” explains Cheung.
Cheung says this emphasis on happiness comes up a lot in the books from the U.S. In some cases it’s overt – central to the plot of the story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The best science fiction, fantasy, and horror novels of 2017”

Strange Weather by Joe Hill Known for sprawling novels such as NOS4A2 or The Fireman, Joe Hill has carved out a name for himself as one of the most promising horror writers working today.
His latest book is a bit different from his others: rather than one massive story, Strange Weather is four short, pointed novels.
The stories span topics as diverse as climate change, gun violence, cell phones, and pure existential horror, resulting in a book that’s positively addictive.
Mason uses the book to look at our relationship with the technological world around us, and how little we understand it.
The Book of Dust: La Belle Sauvage by Philip Pullman 17 years ago, Philip Pullman published the final installment of the His Dark Materials trilogy.
In the years since, he’s worked on a companion book – which turned into a trilogy – called The Book of Dust.
Skullsworn is a standalone entry in the world, unveiling the origins of one of the characters we met in earlier novels.
Other recommended sci-fi and fantasy books from 2017: Tool of War by Paolo Bacigalupi.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The best books of 2017, according to Ezra Klein”

On my podcast, I close each conversation by asking my guest to recommend three books.
I shifted my reading heavily toward books this year.
Above all, the book is an opportunity to be inside Lanier’s mind for 300-some pages.
Like many of my favorite books this year, it’s a bit difficult to describe.
It’s a book of media criticism as much as it is political commentary, and it’s a book about how in certain places at certain times, the two become indistinguishable.
It’s a book that often feels like dystopic science fiction, but it comes at a time when the dystopic has become more recognizable than the mundane.
So I’ve been searching for insight in books about other places, other times, other worlds.
The book begins in the 1910s, and it follows a handful of, well, young radicals, as they navigate one of America’s truly head-snapping decades.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Free for all: How to find free books and movies”

Don’t take your chances that they’re correct – do a little research instead. PublicDomainSherpa.com is a great resource for finding not only lists of freely available works, but also how to discern if something is truly in the public domain.
Google.com houses Google’s scans of all sorts of books, and public domain ones are downloadable.
There you can find public domain books in plain text, EPUB or web browser versions, or even preformatted for the Amazon Kindle.
Authorama.comBrowser-based public domain books.
Gutenberg.orgPublic domain books in a variety of formats.
Archive.orgEverything from films and television to music, some of the works in the public domain, some not.
Google.com Scanned books, including the most notable public domain works.
Librivox.org Volunteers read public domain books to create free audiobook versions.

The orginal article.