Summary of “Five Books Expert Recommendations”

Coronaviruses are RNA viruses like flu and Ebola viruses.
Although SARS-CoV-2 – which is the correct virological nomenclature for the new coronavirus – doesn’t have much in common at the genetic level with, say, herpes viruses, which are DNA viruses, it is 85% identical to SARS-CoV-1 that caused the SARS epidemic in 2003.
The Coming Plague came out just when I was writing my first book about viruses, The Invisible Enemy: A Natural History of Viruses, and it certainly stimulated me to get on with it.
Read. Let’s move on to our next book about viruses.
Dawkins called one of his books The Blind Watchmaker and viruses are totally blind but appear very sophisticated.
Dawkins has a wonderful way of expressing himself in writing, and his books have informed all my writing about viruses, because they’ve given me a feeling for evolution.
We are now using viruses to transfer genes into humans.
They’re always one step ahead. In Viruses: A Very Short Introduction, you quote George Klein to the effect: “The stupidest virus is cleverer than the cleverest virologist.” Where does that leave us? Are we fated to be finally wiped out by a virus that has outsmarted us?

The orginal article.

Summary of “So you want to read classic books during the coronavirus pandemic”

If you are the kind of person who likes to embark upon a project in times of stress, there are worse choices during quarantine than trying to read your way through a bunch of the classic great books.
If your only plan is to read books you vaguely understand to be classics, the idea of starting can be overwhelming.
Books for when you want something familiar and accessible If you want a classic that you can probably finish in about a day and still be able to get plenty out of, turn to the high school reading list staples: They won’t be very long or very dense, and plenty of them are damn good books.
If you want to read back in time, to ease your way into the transition, start with Jane Austen.
You might feel intimidated by the number of pages, but I promise you that if you can read other 19th-century literature, these books are all well within your capabilities as a reader.
Now is the time for The Waves! Now is the time for Ulysses! Now is the time for formal prose experiments that you’re not totally sure you’ll ever fully grasp but want to read anyway, just to see if you can!
Read the Zora Canon, a list of the 100 greatest books by African American women writers.
There are so many books out there waiting for you to read them, and so many of them are good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Read 50-Plus Books Every Year: Here’s How I Do It”

Over the past three years, I’ve read 174 books, and I’ve done it all while balancing a full-time job, extra hobbies, and what I consider to be just the right amount of a social life.
By the time a new year rolled around, I made it a goal to finish 50 books.
Are you hoping to finish more books in 2020? Follow these five tips I’ve picked up along the way.
Narrative style, structure, and your own taste all come into play to determine how long you’ll take to finish a book.
Though other voracious readers may keep up their pace by switching from book to book, I’ve found that sticking with one title at a time helps me to retain my focus and get through books faster.
Let’s face it-not every book is going to grip you in its first page or even its first chapter.
By publicly logging how many books I finished in a year, I found myself getting competitive with myself from month to month.
This is what I most often say to people when they ask me how I finish a considerable number of books per year: It’s something that I set out initially as a goal, which later became a habit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Authors list the books they might finally read in quarantine”

We asked a number of authors about the books that they’ve intended to read over the years without actually reading.
For me this has to be “Middlemarch,” a book I have attempted to read over 100 times, I am sure.
“Middlemarch” is my favorite Victorian novel, but I’ve never read George Eliot’s last opus, “Daniel Deronda.” I’ve had it on my shelves since graduate school – so for nearly 20 years.
For the record, I’ve read the classic long-term TBRs – Proust, Melville and “Infinite Jest” – and see no reason to try “The Man Without Qualities” because I’ve never liked Musil all that much.
Then I will read “Lampedusa,” the novel about Giuseppe di Lampedusa, the author of “The Leopard,” and then reread “The Leopard.” Essentially I’ll engage in a series of linked exercises that will require me to make many more connections that will keep me from my fears.
One book on my ‘to read’ shelf is Yoko Tawada’s “The Emissary,” which won the National Book Award in translated literature.
For the first time in two years, I’m reading a book I don’t have to read. It’s Kate Elizabeth Russell’s “My Dark Vanessa.” I’m also rereading “Sabbath’s Theater.” Oh, and I have to add my downstairs-bathroom book too.
The book that has been on my bookshelves the longest is “Middlemarch.” Now that we’re all facing weeks of self-isolation, I might finally have a chance to read it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How WWII Saved The Great Gatsby From Obscurity”

One day in 1937, F. Scott Fitzgerald stepped into a Los Angeles bookstore hoping to grab a copy of The Great Gatsby.
“One finishes Great Gatsby with a feeling of regret, not for the fate of the people in the book but for Mr. Fitzgerald,” wrote Harvey Eagleton of the Dallas Morning News.
The Great Gatsby sold a modest 20,870 copies-nothing like Fitzgerald’s previous best sellers, This Side of Paradise and The Beautiful and the Damned.
History forgot Fitzgerald while he was still alive, so why do we think of The Great Gatsby as the enduring classic of the Jazz Age? That story begins, and ends, with a world war.
When Gatsby reinvents himself as a rich man, she remains impossible to have-just as Ginevra was to Fitzgerald.
Fitzgerald had a hunch that to write the Great American Novel, he’d have to leave America.
More than one million soldiers read Fitzgerald’s Great American Novel.
These new converts-and the generations that would follow-saw in Gatsby something that Fitzgerald’s contemporaries had dismissed as short-sighted.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lost Translations”

In 2018, for the second year in a row, American publishers released fewer translated titles: 609 books were published, down from 650 in 2017 and the industry high in 2016 of 666.
Statistically, American Literary Translators Association Executive Director Elisabeth Jaquette told me publishers actually make more money per translated title than they do from books originally in English.
In the U.S., AmazonCrossing, Amazon Publishing’s translation-only imprint, publishes more translated titles than anyone else, which is noteworthy considering the imprint only opened in 2010 – a relative newcomer, Jaquette explained, in an industry in which smaller presses have published translations for decades.
Publishing is an old business replete with tradition: To publish, authors must first find an agent; that agent convinces an editor to acquire the book; the editor then convinces colleagues; each decision made in a fairly subjective way.
While publishers can’t translate books that don’t exist, the corollary between the amount of literature written in a country and the number of translated U.S. titles isn’t as direct as one might think.
“Certainly, Spanish is a larger language,” she continued, “So it’s drawing from books published not only in Spain but also Latin America, also books being written in Spanish in the United States. But countries like France and Germany, for example, have a much more elaborate infrastructure of publishers, of agents, of people who are at the international book fairs doing the right sales.” Since the established fairsare in Europe, attendees tend to market books originally written in European languages.
Holland’s government even sends publishers a catalog listing titles released in the Netherlands that year with English-language summaries, proposed contract terms, and reasons each book would sell well here.
“It’s going to be much easier for a publisher sitting in the United States to say, ‘Okay, I could pick up this pamphlet from the Netherlands or I could go to London and meet with a rights agent from a French publisher who I’ve heard of,'” Jaquette said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Margery Kempe Had 14 Children and She Still Invented the Memoir”

The Book of Margery Kempe is mostly the kind of text you read if you’re a medievalist, or maybe an English major at a women’s college, although I was an English major at a women’s college and I didn’t read it until I was in graduate school.
In one of my favorite passages of The Book, Christ tells Margery that she should “Make every Christian man and women your child in your souland have as much grace for them as you have for your own children.” In a spiritual economy in which women could either be spiritual mothers or physical mothers, this vision of Christ suggesting that it is precisely Margery’s physical maternity that makes her a great spiritual intercessor is nothing short of radical.
It is important to note that The Book of Margery Kempe is a book written by a mother but it is not a book about being a mother.
It mostly ignores the years Margery spent birthing and raising her children.
The Book of Margery Kempe is a book written by a mother but it is not a book about being a mother.
The woman’s husband tells Margery that his wife “Roars and cries so that she makes folk terribly afraid.” They have put manacles on her wrists, he says, because she “Will both smite and bite.” But when Margery enters the house, the woman speaks to her calmly.
Writing about this episode, scholar Lynn Staley notes that in helping the postpartum woman, Margery “Seems to offer consolation to her former self.” It is not hard to imagine why Margery might have been popular among married and childbearing women.
By Ellmann’s standards, Margery Kempe certainly had too many children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Reviewer’s Fallacy”

According to Rotten Tomatoes, 92 percent of critics liked the movie.
Viewers gave Daddy’s Home 2 a 59 rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and the critics an 18.
The discrepancy between their estimation and the critics’ is an example of a persistent phenomenon.
As a friend of mine suggests, critics fall prey to a sort of hermeneutic Stockholm syndrome.
Inside Llewyn Davis got 93 from the critics and 74 from the public on Rotten Tomatoes.
Here’s the heart of the problem: The set of critics’ and audiences’ interests do not perfectly overlap but rather form a Venn diagram.
In the audience circle, the pressing question is, “Should I spend some number of the dollars I have to my name and the hours I have left on Earth on this thing?” Critics get in for free and by definition have to read or watch or listen to whatever’s next up.
Take last year’s Best Picture winner, Moonlight, which has a 98 critics’ and 79 audience score on Rotten Tomatoes, and which I haven’t seen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Five Books Expert Recommendations”

With coronavirus in the news, pandemics are on the minds of many, but few who have not read your book on the subject could precisely define what a pandemic is.
Generally, pandemics cross national boundaries, and often modern pandemics cross oceanic boundaries.
Please give us a precis of your book Pandemics: A Very Short Introduction.
The book looks at how pandemics unfold over time and how societies deal with them, with chapters focusing on HIV, cholera, malaria, smallpox and tuberculosis.
Tuberculosis, an epidemic infectious disease, has been around for so long and affected so many people for so long that it’s probably killed more people than any other pandemic.
Turning toward the five books about pandemics you selected, before we take them one-by-one, what criteria shaped your choices?
Without the horse and without the motivation of trade diseases would likely have been isolated instead of becoming pandemics.
Espinosa examines how pandemics influence economic and political events, a topic of great relevance as novel coronavirus continues to spread from its transmission to humans in China and many are reacting to pandemic as not only a humanitarian crisis but also a political and economic event.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Actually Helps You Recover From a Workout? Very Little”

The premise of Good to Go is investigating what works and what doesn’t for athletes at every level – from, like, me to your average NBA professional – trying to recover from exercise.
The idea of a massive industry existing to ameliorate the pains of having worked out sounds like the setup for a hacky standup – wouldn’t it just be easier to exercise less? But the basic idea behind working out, whether building endurance or muscle or skill, is that improvements don’t take place while you’re actually working out; they happen between sessions, as your body is adjusting to all the stress you’ve put it through.
Teach a man why TB12’s IRPJ’s don’t work, and he’ll never get suckered by athletic quack science again.
Last year, Aschwanden and Mai Nguyen wrote a piece for FiveThirtyEight titled “How Shoddy Statistics Found A Home In Sports Research,” in which they laid out how the powers that be in sports science – who are often in bed with traditional science companies desperate for good marketing – decided to deviate from the strict statistical and experimental techniques required in other scientific disciplines.
The suite of studies on the effect stress has on recovery and performance combined with Aschwanden’s own frustrating career as a professional athlete leads her to conclude that stress reduction is the single most important component of recovery.
If you’re driving to a hyberbaric chamber or obsessing over consuming the perfect carb-to-protein ratio within exactly 60 minutes of working out, as she puts it, “Instead of winding down, you’re essentially extending the work day,” and therefore adding a stress load. An old boss and current college track coach told me a few months ago that his job in 2019 meant dealing with his athletes’ stress and anxiety was a higher priority than their shin splints and stress fractures.
Move some causation around, and you’ve basically got the thesis of Good to Go – that the primary inhibitor of recovery is stress, no matter the source, and the best way to recover is to relax.
Not only is doing a ton of shit to recover ridiculous, it doesn’t work.

The orginal article.