Summary of “The 10 Best Books on Productivity and Time Management: 2018”

Here, a selection of books to help boost your productivity and improve your time-management skills.
So for this reading list on the best productivity books and books on time management, I reached out to a broad range of experts from academia, business, journalism, and tech.
Fm; Justin Kerr, author, most recently of How to Be Great at Your Job; Aishwarya Iyer, CEO and founder of Brightland; Jake Knapp, author of Make Time and Sprint; Candace Nelson, co-founder and pastry chef of Sprinkles Cupcakes and Pizzana; Robert Pozen, senior lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management and author of Extreme Productivity; Gretchen Rubin, author and host of the podcast Happier With Gretchen Rubin; Jane Stoller, life coach and author of Organizing Your Lifestyle; Laura Vanderkam, author of several books about time management and productivity, including Off the Clock and Juliet’s School of Possibilities; and Heidi Zak, co-founder and co-CEO of ThirdLove.
These are seven of our panelists’ most-recommended titles on productivity and time management, along with a few Strategist-approved honorable mentions.
Fm, likes the way Allen’s book “Outlines three simple steps to a productivity system adaptable to anyone.” Those steps include using “a ‘collection bucket’ to store things outside your mind and stay focused and creating a ‘next actions’ list for all your projects to avoid thinking in the moment,” says Clark, who adds that his favorite quote from the book is, “Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.” However, the advice can get a little nitty-gritty.
Though productivity books might seem like a modern phenomenon, they have a long history that can be traced all the way back to the 18th century, with the publication of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography.
“Benjamin Franklin managed to be not only one of the Founding Fathers, but also to start a public library, discover electricity, negotiate with France, invent bifocals, and write an American classic. He’s a productivity model for all of us,” says writer and podcast host Gretchen Rubin, who notes that even though this book was written centuries ago, it’s still “Fascinating, stimulating, and also quite funny.”
It’s a good reminder that one of the best things you can do to improve your productivity is to put down your phone, turn off your notifications, and simply focus on the work that needs to get done.

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Summary of “Growing Up Surrounded by Books Could Have Powerful, Lasting Effect on the Mind”

Respondents, who ranged in age from 25 to 65, were asked to estimate how many books were in their house when they were 16 years old.
The surveys, which were taken between 2011 and 2015, showed that the average number of books in participants’ childhood homes was 115, but that number varied widely from country to country.
Across the board it seemed that more books in the home was linked to higher proficiency in the areas tested by the survey.
Growing up with few books in the home resulted in below average literacy levels.
Being surrounded by 80 books boosted the levels to average, and literacy continued to improve until libraries reached about 350 books, at which point the literacy rates leveled off.
The researchers observed similar trends when it came to numeracy; the effects were not as pronounced with information communication technology tests, but skills did improve with increased numbers of books.
What are the implications of the new study? Take adults who grew up with hardly any books in the home, but went on to obtain a university degree in comparison to an adult who grew up with a large home library, but only had nine years of schooling.
Further research is needed to determine precisely why exposure to books in childhood fosters valuable skills later in life, but the study offers further evidence to suggest that reading has a powerful effect on the mind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Bookish Life by Joseph Epstein”

By the bookish life, I mean a life in which the reading of books has a central, even a dominating, place.
The first question is “How can one tell which books qualify as good, beautiful, important?” In an essay of 1978 called “On Reading Books: A Barbarian’s Cogitations,” Alexander ­Gerschenkron, a Harvard economist of wide learning, set out three criteria: A good book must be interesting, memorable, and rereadable.
Some of the best of all books are those one loved when young and finds even better in later life.
Reading may not be the same as conversation, but reading the right books, the best books, puts us in the company of men and women more intelligent than ourselves.
A precondition for reading good books is not reading bad ones: for life is short.
I’ve twice before made a run at Burton’s book, but it now begins to look as if I may have to finish finishing it in the next life.
In The Guermantes Way volume of his great novel, Proust has his narrator note a time when he knew “More books than people and literature better than life.” The best arrangement, like that between the head and the heart, is one of balance between life and reading.
You can get along without reading serious books-many extraordinary, large-hearted, highly intelligent people have-but why, given the chance, would you want to? Books make life so much richer, grander, more splendid.

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Summary of “Top 5 Contemporary Software Engineering Books”

IntroIf you’ve been into software engineering for some time and enjoy reading books, you’ve probably come across some classics such as Code Complete, Refactoring, The Mythical Man-Month or Peopleware.
While they are still great, for this article I’ve put together a list of more recent books that I consider my current personal top 5.
There’s some recency bias, of course, so regard the list as snapshot for the time from 2017 to 2018.The books cover a mix of areas such as software design and management or “People topics”.
It’s one of the most substantial books I’ve ever read about software engineering.
After reading the book you might ask yourself: How do you best apply and integrate your new knowledge into your engineering process and how do you convince co-workers of the value of the approaches? Luckily, there’s tooling support, so start small and keep improving.
Why you should read itThe core topic of A Philosophy of Software Design is simplicity - consequently, the book itself is simple to understand.
It’s a pragmatic and authentic book about technical leadership, management, and people topics in tech companies - without much of the dramatizing and shallow advice that you often find in other “People” books.
Why you should read itAlthough mostly addressing engineering management, the book is certainly valuable for software engineers staying on the technical path.

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Summary of “22 Best Haruki Murakami Books, Ranked”

On the occasion of today’s American release of Haruki Murakami’s latest novel, Killing Commendatore, below is a loosely ranked list of every Murakami book published in the U.S. – the classic, the recommended, books for diehard fans, and those we’d throw down one of his deep, dark wells.
Norwegian WoodThis is the book that transformed Murakami from Japanese success to international phenomenon.
In soft, spare prose, Murakami juxtaposes Naoko’s life inside a rural mental-health clinic with Toru’s languid days, loving her from afar while falling for another woman.
It’s a defining love story of the twentieth century, proof that Murakami is at least as effective without his surrealist shtick, if not more so.
One of his own characters, in “The Widow,” nails what makes Murakami tick: “Don’t try so hard to be the penetrating observer. Writing is, after all, a makeshift thing.”
South of the Border, West of the SunWhen Murakami drops the quirk and sticks to classic forms, he can plumb deeper into the pervasive oddity of society than he does depicting vast underground societies or talking cats.
One piece stars a narrator named Haruki Murakami, another a man who eats only spaghetti for a year, and still another a night watchman whose reflection becomes a different person.
What follows hovers between the Murakami of the real and the Murakami of the imagined, and it never quite finds its own voice.

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Summary of “Growing Up in the Library”

My family lived in the suburbs of Cleveland, about a mile from the brick-faced Bertram Woods Branch of the Shaker Heights Public Library system.
The library might have been the first place that I was ever given independence.
Our visits were never long enough for me-the library was so bountiful.
Libraries might have become just a bookmark of memory more than an actual place, a way to call up an emotion of a moment that occurred long ago, something that was fused with “Mother” and “The past” in my mind.
We were so new to the city that we had to look up the address of the closest library, which turned out to be the Studio City branch.
Decades had passed, and I was two thousand miles away, but I felt as if I had been whisked back to that precise time and place, walking into the library with my mother.
On a library bookshelf, thought progresses in a way that is logical but also dumbfounding, mysterious, irresistible.
The writer Amadou Hampâté Bâ once said that, in Africa, when an old person dies, it is like a library has been burned.

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Summary of “Why I Re-Read My Favorite Books Multiple Times A Year”

About four years ago I decided to read 100 new books a year.
I stopped reading two new books a week because I forgot almost everything I learned more than a year earlier.
There’s no way you can remember even a quarter of a book you read three years ago.
What behaviors, characteristics, or skills do you want to make your own? What books are about those things? Keep those books close.
Every time someone tells me they are afraid to highlight books or that they don’t want to buy books, I question that person’s will to learn.
That’s also why you want to read good books more than once.
It’s better to re-read a good book several times a year, compared to reading a decent book only once or twice.
I don’t admire the person who has read 1,000 books, but I admire the person who has read one book 1,000 times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Six Cookbooks That Will Make You a Better Cook, According to Julia Turshen”

Julia Turshen has long been a sought-after cookbook writer, collaborating with big names like Gwyneth Paltrow and Dana Cowin and famously turning in book drafts an entire year before their due date.
The recipes themselves are inviting, with plenty of room for variations and spin-offs; her Turkey and Ricotta Meatballs, one of the most popular recipes from Small Victories, captures her style of cooking: approachable, homey, and hearty.
Now Turshen’s back with Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers, a cookbook with the heart of a memoir, filled with personal essays and recipes.
Already declared one of the best cookbooks this fall, Turshen’s new book cements her expert status – so we asked the cookbook author and collector to tell us her recommendations.
If you want to get into baking: The Back in the Day Bakery Cookbook by Cheryl Day and Griffith Day “I love Cheryl and Griffith Day’s cookbooks; they will make you feel comfortable with baking. The recipes are great, of course; both well-tested and well-written. Their bakery is such a comforting place to me, and eating their food and following their recipes would be great ways to taste their comfort in your own kitchen.”
Buy The Back in the Day Bakery Cookbook, $13.87 If you want to master the fundamentals: Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking by Samin Nosrat “Samin’s book is like getting to go to a cooking school. She does an incredible job of explaining why we do certain things when we cook. Reading that book and using it will leave you as a much more informed cook. She is also a fantastic writer, so her lessons will stick with you.”
If you are short on time: Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean, and Southern Flavors Remixed by Bryant Terry “Who isn’t short on time?? The book is full of really creative, nourishing recipes and many of them are simple and quick. Plus it’s inspiring, which always helps you get a little energy in your kitchen.”
Buy Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean, and Southern Flavors Remixed, $18.70 If you want something entertaining to peruse: Country Weekends by Lee Bailey “I love flipping through this book. It feels like a time capsule of a stylish Hamptons weekender from the 1980s, and I always want to cook after looking through it.”

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Summary of “The Deliberate Awfulness of Social Media”

So why hasn’t Sharpe done a runner, like Matt Damon lighting out for the territory? And why, more to the point, haven’t I? The obvious answer is that social media is an addiction.
The first argument in Jaron Lanier’s recent book, “Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now,” is that the nexus of consumer technologies and submerged algorithms, which forms so large a part of contemporary reality, is deliberately engineered to get us hooked.
This toxic miasma of bad vibes-of masochistic pleasures-is not, in Lanier’s view, an epiphenomenon of social media, but rather the fuel on which it has been engineered to run.
Lanier has coined a term for this process: he calls it BUMMER, which stands for “Behaviours of Users Modified, and Made into an Empire for Rent.” In Lanier’s view, BUMMER is responsible, in whole or in part, for a disproportionate number of our contemporary ailments, from the election of Donald Trump to the late-career resurgence of measles due to online anti-vaccine paranoia.
Lanier argues, are peculiarly vulnerable to deliberate or incidental misinterpretation, because context can be applied to what you say after the fact.
“New Dark Age” is among the most unsettling and illuminating books I’ve read about the Internet, which is to say that it is among the most unsettling and illuminating books I’ve read about contemporary life.
Bridle doesn’t want to convince you to delete your social-media accounts, although you might be more likely to do so as a result of having read his book than Lanier’s.
Like Lanier’s book, though in a very different register, it risks presenting the Internet as both the manifestation and cause of all of our deepest problems.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Python Books”

Check out the Best Python Books for Kids for resources aimed at a younger audience.
The best intermediate and advanced Python books provide insight to help you level up your Python skills, enabling you to become an expert Pythonista.
This section focuses on the first of these two scenarios, with reviews of the books we consider to be the best Python programming books for readers who are new to both programming and Python.
What I like best about Real Python is that, in addition to covering the basics in a thorough and friendly way, the book explores some more advanced uses of Python that none of the other books hit on, like web-scraping.
Any of the books in this section will give you a deeper understanding of Python programming concepts and teach you how to write developer-style Python code.
To gain a solid foundation, you really can’t go wrong with any of the best books to learn Python.
If you want to learn Python with a child, or maybe teach a group of kids, check out the list of best Python books for kids.
After you’ve got your feet wet, check out some of the best intermediate and advanced Python books to dig in deeper to less obvious concepts that will improve the efficiency of your code.

The orginal article.