Summary of “Going against the decluttering craze: the book hoarders who defy Marie Kondo”

Of course, there was a backlash to the backlash, with the expected explanation from Kondo that not all books gotta go.
On the coffee table at the moment are coffee table books: The History of Rap, the book Author: The Portraits of Beowulf Sheehan, which I’m thankfully featured in.
I’m still trying to figure out how she wrote a book that spans 25 years in only 25,000 words.
For 35 years, there was a bright pink bookstore in my town called Remarkable Book Shop.
I’m now able to get rid of books much more easily knowing they’re going to a good home.
If I’m writing about dinosaurs, I’ll have every single book about dinosaurs already in the same section – children’s books, history books, comic books.
It’s a book from a chef in Spain, from the 1890s.
What 30 books does Ms Kondo keep? Are they the same books or does she rotate them? I’d be fascinated to know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Anthony Bourdain: Helen Rosner reflects on his legacy in The Last Interview”

The following is the introduction to Anthony Bourdain: The Last Interview and Other Conversations, written by New Yorker writer Helen Rosner, which details her growing up admiring Anthony Bourdain and then getting to know him later in life.
Readers may have bought the book to get insight into a world ten feet from their dinner table, but it was Bourdain the man who kept us reading-the character on the page, the voice recounting the story.
Bourdain is best known, now, for his extraordinary television career, and he’s most often categorized as a cook, but to me he’s always a writer-he’s the author of some dozen books, and uncountable essays and blog posts and show notes-and Kitchen Confidential is the knuckle-crack of a fighter getting ready to wallop.
Despite my love affair with Kitchen Confidential, I didn’t read another Bourdain book until around 2014, after deciding that I probably ought to understand why this Bourdain guy was still such a big deal.
After two years with the Food Network, Bourdain launched a new show with the Travel Channel, No Reservations-a bigger, smarter, more idiosyncratic eating-around-the-world show.
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown was ostensibly a food show, but it’s more accurate to think of it as a brutally beautiful documentary series, or a ballistic missile of pure humanity, a meticulous and often radically compassionate exploration of not only what people eat around the world, but the deep and indelible why: the wars, the zoning laws, the climate disasters, the religious strife, the historical necessity.
Even after we became friends, I had a hard time calling Bourdain “Tony.” He would tease me about it, and speculate about which presumably deep Freudian well my resistance to his preferred name sprang from.
Maybe it’s because Bourdain spent more adult years as a civilian than a celebrity, but the man talking about his hustler’s work ethic in the Rain Taxi Review of Books in 2003 is the same person leaning back in his chair in 2018, chatting with Trevor Noah in front of the cameras of the Daily Show about his rage at the President of the United States referring to El Salvador, Haiti, and the entire continent of Africa as “Shithole countries.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Adventure Town Bookstores Worth Traveling For”

Maybe you’re less nerdy than I am, but one of my abiding joys while traveling is finding the best bookstore in any given town.
Adventure towns, somewhat miraculously, are still home to some of the best independent bookstores in the country.
Back of BeyondMoab, Utah Tucked between T-shirt shops on Moab’s main drag, Back of Beyond, a legendary hub of backcountry literature, is jammed with new books and rare old titles about the Colorado Plateau, conveniently organized around dirtbag-friendly categories.
Environmental nonfiction features prominently and is next to the shelf full of river books, which is across from the adventure narratives.
What to Read? You’re in Edward Abbey territory, and Back of Beyond has a deep catalog of his books, along with other titles that tread the line of monkeywrenching, like Amy Irvine’s Trespass and David Gessner’s All the Wild That Remains.
Book NookBuena Vista, Colorado Get yourself to the Arkansas River Valley in October, when the Book Nook is celebrating its tenth birthday.
Homey Key West Island Books is a hub for the local writing and reading scene.
What to Read? Sparks loves a lot of local books, including Nick Pyenson’s Spying on Whales.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Exit Interview: I Was a Black, Female Thru-Hiker on the Appalachian Trail”

Only about a quarter of thru-hikers are women, according to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, and though there’s little information about the racial breakdown of thru-hikers, it’s safe to say that the vast majority of them are white.
Last year, Rahawa Haile, a writer now based in Oakland, California, became one of the very few black women to attempt to hike the entire trail.
Part of your plan for your hike was to bring books by black authors with you and leave them along the trail.
I attempted to create a library of black excellence along the Appalachian Trail.
Haile brought books by black authors to vistas along the trail.
It’s not the trail that’s the problem with the trail.
There were sections of trail where it’s just rocks and copperheads and where it doesn’t look like a trail at all.
Recently I started looking up PCT hikes, and when I looked up photos, I was shocked, like, that looks like an actual trail! A guy I hiked with up north does trail maintenance in Colorado, and he said that often the Appalachian Trail follows the fall line, so you just have this crazy jumble of rocks to climb down.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Confessions of a Failed Self-Help Guru”

“Many of these people are no more qualified to dole out life lessons than you or I.”.
Yes, getting asked to do interviews and appearances means people actually care about your book, or at least some producer or event organizer facing a hole in their programming schedule does.
Rather than follow any of the aforementioned advice, I zigzagged along like the harried freelancer I’d become, rushing from column deadline to media interview to public event and back again, trying to keep both my Amazon ranking and checking account from tanking, often pulling all-nighters to keep up.
Writing a book about creating a self-styled career you love had led me straight to a job I hated.
Sunday evenings now gave me the same fetal-position dread my book claimed to help readers avoid.
People with unfathomable health problems and insurmountable piles of medical bills.
One career advice columnist I knew had received letters from people asking if their family still could collect on the life insurance policy if the letter-writer committed suicide.
Responsibility to not try to solve people’s problems you are in no way equipped to fix.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Incredibly Clever Hack for People Who Want to Read More Books”

According to Charles Duhigg, who literally wrote the book on the subject, all habits work fundamentally the same way, whether they’re good or bad: You experience some cue or trigger that brings the habit to mind, you perform your usual routine, and then you receive a reward of some kind.
For this particular habit, there’s something that blocks you from enjoying books the way you read Facebook.
You need to give yourself permission to read tiny chunks of books.
Every time you feel your “Facebook Trigger,” instead of reaching for your mobile device, grab a book.
It’s best if it’s a physical book at first, because a mobile device is too tempting.
Now, read the book! To start, just pick a page in the book and start reading.
Daily Rituals is a good book to start with, because it has lots of small sections; or try Dangerous Liaisons if you prefer fiction.
In just a couple of weeks, you’ll find yourself not only reading more, Kadavy promises, but also starting to feel more invested in your identity as a reader, which should only reinforce your new good habit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Fell for Clean Eating”

At its simplest, clean eating is about ingesting nothing but “Whole” or “Unprocessed” foods.
At first, clean eating sounded modest and even homespun: rather than counting calories, you would eat as many nutritious home-cooked substances as possible.
Clean eating has been attacked by critics such as the baker and cookbook author Ruby Tandoh for being an incitement to eating disorders.
Why has clean eating proved so difficult to kill off? Hadley Freeman, in this paper, identified clean eating as part of a post-truth culture, whose adherents are impervious, or even hostile, to facts and experts.
To understand how clean eating took hold with such tenacity, it’s necessary first to consider just what a terrifying thing food has become for millions of people in the modern world.
A second version of clean eating was spearheaded by a former cardiologist from Uruguay called Alejandro Junger, the author of Clean: The Revolutionary Program to Restore the Body’s Natural Ability to Heal Itself, which was published in 2009 after Junger’s clean detox system had been praised by Gwyneth Paltrow on her Goop website.
Alice Liveing, a 23-year-old personal trainer who writes as Clean Eating Alice, argued in her 2016 book Eat Well Every Day that she was “Championing what I feel is a much-needed breath of fresh air in what I think is an incredibly saturated market”.
McGregor’s main concern about clean eating, she added, was that as a professional treating young people with eating disorders, she had seen first-hand how the rules and restrictions of clean eating often segued into debilitating anorexia or orthorexia.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Will Help You Grasp the Sizes of Things in the Universe”

“The start of your journey through this book and through all known scales of reality is at that edge between known and unknown,” he writes.
Nautilus caught up with him to talk about our experience with scale and why he thinks it’s mysterious.
We talk about space and time-and perhaps we puzzle more over the nature of time than we do over the nature of scale or space-but it’s equally mysterious.
We’re aware of a very narrow range of scales: In some sense, we know more about the very large than we do about the very small.
On the big scale, it’s stuff we can actually see, we can actually chart.
We have all this rich stuff going on in the scale of the solar system and the earth and our biological scale.
It is the scale where matter seems to condense down, where things appear solid, when in fact, it’s equally empty on the inside.
How did you represent things that we don’t have pictures of, like the surface of an exoplanet, or things at really small scales?

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Jordan Bookseller’s 24-Hour ‘Emergency Room for the Mind'”

He wants to ensure there is always a place in Jordan where one can access the healing power of books, no matter the hour or the price.
All of his prices are negotiable, and he has both a generous loan policy and a robust book exchange program, where patrons can swap any book they bring in for one in the store.
Hamzeh refused the gift after noticing a line that described Israelis as “The butcher.” Elbaum, who first met Hamzeh during a summer stay in Jordan studying Arabic, has maintained a close friendship with him, and Hamzeh recently gave him six volumes of the Talmud in Arabic.
In 1921 the shop passed to Salman’s son Khalil, who would later buy the libraries of departing British officials in an auction bid, gaining a massive inventory that still fills Hamzeh’s shelves, from books on the Commonwealth to Latin primers.
“A favorite book! No! That is extremism! To say one book is the best, better than any other no, I could never do it.” He loves all the books in his store equally and fiercely, and that is that.
His clientele is dedicated, but not wealthy, and Hamzeh may have to leave al-Maa, though for many it is impossible to imagine him doing anything but sipping tea at 3 a.m., cross-legged in a corner of his shop, providing literary guidance and carefully curated book suggestions to all who stop by.
Hamzeh springs into action, grabbing books from shelves and expertly teasing out volumes from piles around the store.
As the man leaves, Hamzeh shows me a children’s book in Arabic about the Wright brothers that he had pulled down, a copy of one of the first books he ever read. He starts singing “I believe I can fly,” thumbing the pages and telling me how his father had taught him to read during those late, quiet nights at the shop.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Our Editors

We’ll take our cue from the author herself and ignore the 1915 chapbook The Book of Repulsive Women-an “Idiotic” title, Barnes said, and she torched copies to keep them out of the public’s hands-leaving the modernist’s semi-autobiographical novel Ryder as her first true work.
His first book, Windy McPherson’s Son, came out three years earlier, when Anderson was only 39.
William S. Burroughs of Naked Lunch fame, published his first book, Junky, at age 40.
Although a prolific writer, Angelou did not publish her first book until 1969, when she was 41.
While working as an actor’s manager, Bram Stoker, who would later inaugurate the modern-day vampire craze with his book Dracula, published his first book, The Snake’s Pass, when he was 43.
Alex Haley, The Autobiography of Malcolm X. Most famous for his 1976 novel, Roots: The Saga of an American Family, Haley published his first book, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, in 1965, when he was 44.
Her first book, Seven Gothic Tales, won praise when it was first published in the United States in 1934, when Blixen was 49.
Art historian Bridget Quinn published scholarly articles, but she didn’t publish her first book, Broad Strokes-which highlights overlooked female artists-until 2017.

The orginal article.