Summary of “How to Read More Books”

When people ask me how I read so many books, they’re usually fishing for a speed reading technique that will allow their brains to swallow books whole.
Being amazed at how many books I read in a year would be like being amazed at how many leaky faucets a plumber fixed in a year.
With that said, in addition to the books I read specifically for the Art of Manliness last year, I also managed to read 2-3 books every month for pleasure.
So the #1 secret to reading more is to spend more time reading.
What’s more, studies suggest that reading comprehension increases when you read an analog book compared to reading on digital devices.
As mentioned above, when people ask me how I read so many books, they often assume I’m speed reading.
If you’ve read one personal development book you’ve read them all.
I know a lot about WWII history because I’ve read a lot of books about WWII. I know a lot about Theodore Roosevelt because I’ve read a lot of books about Theodore Roosevelt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is the E-Reader Dead?”

After 10 years of uncertainty, it seems that we finally live in a world where readers of both print and digital books can live in peace with each other.
“The Kindle device is purpose-built for reading, so you can fully immerse yourself in an author’s story. Kindle doesn’t distract a reader with social media, emails and text messages,” an Amazon representative told Tom’s Guide.
More than one-quarter of U.S. adults read no books.
In 2016; of the 74 percent who did, some read a single book “In part.” The average U.S. reader finishes from four to 12 books per year, depending on whether you want to go with the median or the mean.
The number of people who read, and the amount that they read, have both been steadily decreasing.
“It’s very difficult to have escapist reading when you have to keep up with political reading,” continued Kudisch.
“We are spending so much time fighting, it’s difficult to spend time reading. If readership is declining, blame politics. Blame the climate that makes us feel like we have to be plugged into Twitter during our reading time.”
One could argue that a smartphone or tablet would provide just as many opportunities for genre writers and readers to find one another, but remember: Kudisch’s readers don’t generally buy her books on smartphones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “12 Books That Made Me Think”

Though there is no objective best book or most-thought provoking book, I do think there is a best book for you, right now.
The best rule of thumb to discover these books is to find people with similar reading tastes to you, and then ask them for the best books they read when they were in a spot in their lives similar to what you’re currently going through.
I’ll assume, since you clicked on an article called “12 books that made me think,” you are asking which books impacted me.
In that vein, below are a compilation of the books that made me smarter at different points in my life.
I don’t agree with all the points made in these books and often the book forced me to do the valuable work of understanding and articulating why I disagreed.
If you haven’t read any of them, then I think starting with whichever book seems most interesting is the best way to go.
Get a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including the best books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.
If you liked this article, you might want to download a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including my favorite books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I have forgotten how to read”

Out for dinner with another writer, I said, “I think I’ve forgotten how to read.”.
It’s been unnerving to realize: I have forgotten how to read – really read – and I’ve been refusing to talk about it out of pride.
To read was to disappear, become enrobed in something beyond my own jittery ego.
When we become cynical readers – when we read in the disjointed, goal-oriented way that online life encourages – we stop exercising our attention.
What’s at stake is not whether we read. It’s how we read. And that’s something we’ll have to each judge for ourselves; it can’t be tallied by Statistics Canada.
We should, instead, marvel at the fact we ever read books at all.
Do they grab; do they anger? Can this be read without care? Are the sentences brief enough? And the thoughts? It’s tempting to let myself become so cynical a writer because I’m already such a cynical reader.
So maybe that change into a cynical writer can be forestalled – if I can first correct my reading diet, remember how to read the way I once did.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The First 6 Pages of Bill Gates’s Favorite Book Will Change Your Life”

If you’re pessimistic about the state of world today, Bill Gates and Harvard psychology professor Steven Pinker have a message for you: “This bleak assessment of the state of the world is wrong. And not just a little wrong-wrong wrong, flat-earth wrong, couldn’t-be-more-wrong.”
The quote appears on the first page of Pinker’s new book, Enlightenment Now.
In a recent blog post, Bill Gates calls it his new “Favorite book of all time.” Pinker and Gates are optimists.
In the first few pages of Pinker’s book, he makes the point that civilization has made “Spectacular progress” in nearly every possible way.
Each chapter of Pinker’s book covers striking accomplishments in 15 areas including: life, health, wealth/abundance, peace, safety, equal rights, and more.
Here’s just one example of how Pinker’s book puts our lives into perspective.
Pinker cites several built-in biases that prevent us from seeing the world in perspective.
Although we make more and live better and longer than any generation in history, people “Adapt to changes in their fortunes…and quickly return to a genetically determined baseline,” writes Pinker.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read”

“I almost always remember where I was and I remember the book itself. I remember the physical object,” says Paul, the editor of The New York Times Book Review, who reads, it is fair to say, a lot of books.
“While I read that book, I knew not everything there was to know about Ben Franklin, but much of it, and I knew the general timeline of the American revolution,” she says.
Surely some people can read a book or watch a movie once and retain the plot perfectly.
“Reading is a nuanced word,” she writes, “But the most common kind of reading is likely reading as consumption: where we read, especially on the internet, merely to acquire information. Information that stands no chance of becoming knowledge unless it ‘sticks.'”.
The lesson from his binge-watching study is that if you want to remember the things you watch and read, space them out.
If you read a book all in one stretch-on an airplane, say-you’re just holding the story in your working memory that whole time.
People might do that when they study, or read something for work, but it seems unlikely that in their leisure time they’re going to take notes on Gilmore Girls to quiz themselves later.
In a piece for The New Yorker called “The Curse of Reading and Forgetting,” Ian Crouch writes, “Reading has many facets, one of which might be the rather indescribable, and naturally fleeting, mix of thought and emotion and sensory manipulations that happen in the moment and then fade. How much of reading is just a kind of narcissism-a marker of who you were and what you were thinking when you encountered a text?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ten Things I Learned from Ursula K. Le Guin”

“All of us have to learn how to invent our lives, make them up, imagine them. We need to be taught these skills; we need guides to show us how. If we don’t, our lives get made up for us by other people.” -Ursula K. Le Guin, The Wave in the Mind, 2004.
Ursula K. Le Guin was one of the first science-fiction writers I read. I was in college at the time, breathing the heady air of second wave feminism, when a book clerk handed me The Left Hand of Darkness.
I’ve heard many other readers say the same thing I felt: that book took the top of my head right off.
There is no reason a book of ideas can’t also be deeply moving, gorgeously written, and inhabited by people who take rooms in your heart and never move out.
You can regret a decision you made in an earlier book and correct it in a later work.
There is no reason why your next book can’t be your best yet, no matter how old you are allowed to become.
In 2014, at the National Book Awards, she warned us that bad times were coming and that we’d all have to work to “Imagine some real grounds for hope.”
“If you can see a thing whole,” he said, “It seems that it’s always beautiful. Planets, lives But close up, a world’s all dirt and rocks. And day to day, life’s a hard job, you get tired, you lose the pattern. You need distance, interval. The way to see how beautiful earth is, is to see it from the moon. The way to see how beautiful life is, is from the vantage point of death.” -Ursula K. Le Guin, The Dispossessed, 1974.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These 9 science-backed books could change your life in 2018”

The good news is that these 9 books provide valuable science-backed information for how to have the best year yet.
In his new book, ‘WHEN’, New York Times best-selling author Dan Pink distills thousands of research studies to help us hack time.
Thousands of studies now show that meditation can help make us be more emotionally intelligent by reducing our negative emotions and helping us make better decisions.
Part of a life of meaning is a life that contributes to other people’s lives.
So much research points to the healing effects and mood-boosting impact of time spent outside in nature! Spend more time in green places, stroll in the park, buy some plants and plan nature vacations; it will help your kids so much too!
From over a decade of research on the topic of happiness, I’ve seen time and again that one of the greatest predictors of an energized joyful life is kindness – it will make you not only happier but it may also make you healthier and help you live longer! Make daily random acts of kindness a new year’s resolution.
Love for others, compassion, kindness, self-love, romantic love she has spent her life exploring this deep and multi-faceted topic and has educated thousands through her sold-out classes.
The science is clear: yoga, meditation, breathing, compassion, kindness, self-compassion and meaning all contribute to a life well-lived; a life that is happier and healthier.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If It’s Important, Learn It Repeatedly”

I’m sure the Germans or the Japanese have a word that means, precisely, “Life-changing ideas that do not change our lives because we only read about them once, agree enthusiastically, and then forget them before we act on them.”
How many times has your mind been set ablaze by a profound truth from a book, podcast, article, or a speech, only for the idea to fade before you could do anything with it? How many millions of people read Steven Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People eight or ten or twenty-five years ago, agreed with it wholeheartedly, and never became highly effective in any of those ways?
Alain de Botton, in another wonderful book I read and immediately forgot, identified the problem, or at least a major part of it: when we only learn something once, we don’t really learn it-at least not well enough for it to change us much.
As an orthodox Jew, 300 days a year were marked out for commemoration and ritual repetition of ideas in the Torah, while as a Zen priest, one would be inducted to sit cross-legged and meditate up to twelve times between daybreak and nightfall.
Bringing a truth to mind repeatedly gives it an enduring, three-dimensional existence in your head, by reaching you in every mood and every context, in every season, both at times when you’re enthusiastic about it, and when you’re tired of hearing it.
If you’ve ever read a book a second time, you may have noticed that it’s an entirely different experience from the first time.
So in my case it warrants a second read, and a third read, perhaps many more, as I implement its increasingly familiar ideas.
The idea is to develop a modest but consistent meditation practice and a few mindful living habits, at a gentle pace of about ten minutes a day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The trick to cutting your airfare prices in half”

Airline passengers are used to hearing someone say the cheapest day to book a flight is on a Tuesday.
The most important trick to snagging cheaper airfare is to book your ticket precisely 54 days in advance.
What’s the deal with airfare prices? Over the past two years, ticket prices have declined by 3%, while passengers are slammed with checked bag fees and shrinking legroom, all at the expense of airlines cramming more seats on aircraft for more profits.
Of course, there’s the well-worn Tuesday trick, which is, simply: Book your flights on a Tuesday.
Chances are, you’re not booking on the perfect day.
According to Jeff Klee, CEO of CheapAir, the perfect day to book airfare is precisely 54 days in advance, on the dot.
The company found that between 320 and 106 days before a trip, plane tickets tend to hover at a static price.
At the 105-day mark, price start dropping, until they reach a nadir at 54 days, before ticking back up.

The orginal article.