Summary of “How Politico’s Next Generation Took Over Washington”

It’s been a year since Anna Palmer, Jake Sherman, and Daniel Lippman took over Politico’s Playbook newsletter, the always insightful, relentlessly insidery bible for Washington’s swamp-creature class.
Lippman had helped Allen with his column since 2014, but he took over full-time with Palmer and Sherman one year ago, on July 11, 2016.
People did like what they were doing with Playbook.
Sherman: We have readers in all 50 states, and we see Playbook as the connective tissue, not just for people in Washington involved in the political game but for people in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Chicago, who are involved, interested, or need to understand it to conduct their daily business.
More people are reading Playbook than ever before and more people are opening it than ever before and it’s making more money than ever before.
Palmer: We’ve been focused on people who are new in town.
Palmer: One memorable thing we’ve done is to create the Playbook Interview, which has been a way to interview high-level people on the news when people want to send a signal to Washington, like Warren Buffet or Bill Gates.
We talked to people at C.A.A. about that and they said, “Wow, we like that book too.” So we are doing it with Crown and it is coming out in March 2019.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you should quit reading paper books”

According to Pew Internet, 65% of American adults read a print book in the previous twelve months, while only 28% had read an e-book.
I believe everyone should quit reading print books almost entirely.
The smell, the feel, and the touch of a print book is something I adore, but what I can’t stand is to spend countless hours reading only to have it slowly leak away into irretrievable oblivion.
When you read on Kindle and highlight passages that you find beautiful, interesting, or challenging, you’re sending your future self a hell of a gift, but it doesn’t feel that way until way later.
Dan Simmons, Hyperion Cantos, Book 1″Mark Twain once opined in his homey way:”The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug.
During those long months of beginning my Cantos on Heaven’s Gate, I discovered that the difference between finding the right word as opposed to accepting the almost right word was the difference between being struck by lightning and merely watching a lightning display.
“I have thousands of highlights like this. I periodically review a book’s highlights via Kindle’s”notes and highlights” page, but I love to export them to Evernote where I can search my notes.
Books and the knowledge they contain are some of the most remarkable creations of humanity, but we pay more attention to our Instagram than our favorite ideas - all in favor of our love for feeling paper.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sherman Alexie on How Trump is Turning the US Into a Reservation”

Sherman Alexie is not – and has never been – the Indian you expect.
As an infant, he endured multiple surgeries to deal with congenital hydrocephalus, or “Water on the brain”; he had seizures until he was 7, he wet the bed, he got teased for his slightly large head. His parents were both alcoholics, but when Alexie was young, his mother stopped drinking entirely – a decision Alexie credits with ultimately saving his life.
The first stop: the white school on the edge of the reservation, where, as Alexie tells it, “The only other Indian was the mascot.” In Reardan, the rural farm town where he went to high school – sometimes hitchhiking, sometimes walking the 20 miles between home and school – he crafted himself into an all-American Indian, which is to say, a part-time Indian: Among his all-white classmates, he was prom king, and president of the Future Farmers of America, and captain of the basketball team.
Ten Little Indians is filled with stories of men trying to figure out jobs and relationships and sex and class off the reservation; the film The Business of Fancydancing, which Alexie wrote and directed, tells the story of a gay Indian poet living in Seattle and working through his ambivalence about producing work whose primary audience is middle-class white ladies.
As Alexie put it, the people who didn’t like him on the reservation when he was a kid – the ones who teased him and beat him up, either for being different or for leaving the rez – are the same people who don’t like him now.
White people ask him, “What can do I, how can I be better?” “Don’t cry on my shoulder,” Alexie said.
“Everyone wanted to have me come on their show, or be interviewed. But it’s not my tribe, it’s not my reservation, it’s not my fight to be a spokesperson for,” Alexie said.
It’s difficult to predict how the internet will react to a piece of art, given what Alexie calls “The microscopic political climate” and the endless, only occasionally generative debates about whether or not a text is feminist.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Famous Book Hoarders”

You only have to own one thousand books to qualify as a book hoarder.
In general, I’m interested in other people’s book collections.
How many books, which ones, how are they kept, where are they kept? So, one rainy afternoon, I started poking around the book collections of famous people, to see which ones happened to be book hoarders.
During a “Master class” at the 2015 International Festival of Fashion and Photography, Lagerfeld explained: “Today, I only collect books; there is no room left for something else. If you go to my house, I’ll have you walk around the books. I ended up with a library of 300,000. It’s a lot for an individual.” No kidding.
His collection includes books in French, English, and German, and in order to create more space in his home for all the volumes, he stacks his books sideways-that is, horizontally instead of vertically.
During Michael Jackson’s life, he was a regular customer at his local bookstores in Los Angeles, including Book Soup and Skylight.
Jackson’s attorney Bob Sanger told L.A. Weekly that the pop star had 10,000 books at the Neverland Ranch, “[a]nd there were places that he liked to sit, and you could see the books with his bookmarks in it, with notes and everything in it where he liked to sit and read. And I can tell you from talking to him that he had a very-especially for someone who was self-taught, as it were, and had his own reading list-he was very well-read.”.
Hearst had two libraries in his castle/Ken Dream House-the main library, which held 4,000 volumes, and the Gothic study, which held 3,000, but it seems even that wasn’t enough space for all his books, and he tucked them pretty much wherever he could find room.

The orginal article.

Summary of “101 books to dive into this summer: A reading list |”

Here’s a huge list of TED speaker-recommended books, with all the diversity of titles and topics you might expect.
L’Engle is best known for her award-winning children’s literature, but I enjoy all of her books.
In the tradition of books like Alive and In Cold Blood, Deep Down Dark is a nonfiction account that reads like a novel.
This is one of those books that will hang onto you, long after you finish reading.
Before reading this book, I had an intellectual sense of how institutionalized racism manifests itself in criminal justice, but reading this book really opened my eyes not only to the pervasiveness of the problem but also to concrete and tragic examples of the real lives that have been destroyed by injustice.
If you want to dive into how change happens in cities, this book has a lot of great and useful stories.
It’s really a tossup which of the Barefoot Contessa books I’d most like to recommend, because I cherish them all.
Some books are a great summer read. Some books can save your life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “David “DHH” Heinemeier Hansson: The Entrepreneurial and Unstoppable Stoic”

The first book on Stoicism I picked up was William Irvine’s A Guide to the Good Life.
Control over your emotions, your reactions, and the perspective to let all the little things in daily life flow by without putting you off course.
How do Stoicism and a rich life overlap in your eyes?
Every week to imagine what life would look like if it all went POOF!, as it frequently does for wealthy people.
How do you think Stoicism can help ambitious young people who are trying to figure out their path in life?
Trading the best decades of your life to compress work into it so you can live in retired leisure afterwards is a mistaken pursuit.
I’d start with A Guide to the Good Life., then On the Shortness of Life.
“Life is long enough, and a sufficiently generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested.” – Seneca.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

I’m always trying to save a few bucks when stocking up on books for my beat-up Kindle or my iPad. I’m not a big ebook reader, but I do use it to crank through classic books I should have already read-books too unwieldy to carry during my morning and evening commute.
Luckily for me, there are thousands of free books available from places like Project Gutenberg.
You, like me, probably want properly formatted ebooks for your devices, or books with covers that aren’t white text on a blue background.
Each book’s page has its word count, reading score, and a synopsis of the title, along with a changelog for the book itself.
The differences between your average book from Project Gutenberg and Standard Ebooks are pretty substantial.
First off, all Standard Ebooks books are presented with aesthetically pleasing front covers rather than sparse text covers.
Typographical quirks like curly quotes and em dashes are addressed, so ebooks look like books and not text documents.
Each book has an epub, Kindle, Kobo, and new “Epub3” format for download. On my iPad, opening an epub file in Chrome forced me to download the file before opening it, while Safari gave me the option to read it in iBooks straightaway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Gates’ favorite books on science”

For decades, Bill Gates made billions in technology.
Over the years, Gates has recommended a number of science-related books to the public.
Genome science can hardly be considered a topic of mainstream interest, but Gates says Mukherjee manages to capture its relevance to people’s daily lives.
“The Grid” is a perfect example of how Bill Gates thinks about book genres the way Netflix thinks about TV and movies.
Gates calls Shah’s book “Probably the best choice” if you only have time to read one book on the subject.
Harari’s most recent book makes him a repeat appearance on Gates’ summer reading list.
“So far, the things that have shaped society – what we measure ourselves by – have been either religious rules about how to live a good life, or more earthly goals like getting rid of sickness, hunger, and war,” Gates wrote.
On the heels of the 2015 Paris climate summit, Gates wrote on his blog that “Sustainable Materials With Both Eyes Open” struck him because so few environmental books talk directly about “How we make stuff.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Umberto Eco: The Productivity Patterns of a Polymath”

An interviewer once asked Umberto Eco, “Do you ever not work?”.
Let us look to an essay from Umberto Eco’s How to Travel with a Salmon & Other Essays, titled How to Spend Time.
“In a normal year there are 8,760 hours. Reckon eight hours’ sleep per night, one hour a day to get up, shave, and dress, add a half hour for undressing and setting the glass of water on the commode, and no more than two hours for meals, and we reach a total of 4,197.5 hours.”The calculations continue, running through teaching duties, academic papers, advising, email, writing, travel, conferences, until.
“Okay,” you say, “That’s not so bad. A lot of people work for eight hours a day.”
Second, these numbers Eco mentions are “Assuming I do not write a book”.
Eco also mentions he has “Not calculated the time spent reading printed matter”.
Pretty impressive, no? Eco easily worked four times as much as the average American.
Plenty of academics, creatives and entrepreneurs work just as hard.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What does it mean for a journalist today to be a Serious Reader?”

Love of reading was, if not innate, second nature: his mother, a linguistics professor; father, an English professor; brother, an art critic; and four sisters, all Ph.Ds. The labor of writing, as he’s put it, “Is, if not uniquely hard work, then uniquely draining.” Reading afterward is emotionally and intellectually replenishing.
Journalists would seem to have a professional responsibility, maybe even a public duty, to self-educate with greater strategy and intensity-to be Serious Readers.
My reporting was bound to overlook brilliant, worthy readers, but to help identify which journalists exemplify lifestyles of Serious Reading, it was useful to follow chains of admiration.
As he once explained, “I spend half my day writing about television, and the other half writing about books, and I read instead of sleep.” One way or another, Serious Readers must overcome a basic problem: There are only so many hours in a day.
There may not be an entrance exam for journalists, but is there a threshold of reading necessary to earn credibility covering a topic-some quantity of books read, or some familiarity with seminal works? On a basic level, sure, but that also misses the lesson of Traister’s childhood.
Her work reading aligns almost perfectly with what she’d read for pleasure.
As a teen, Christopher Hitchens was a voracious but directionless reader, later recalling, “I was too brittle to decide among so many possible treats.” If only he had a Serious Reading Pyramid, right?
“To be a good reader, paradoxically, doesn’t mean being a discriminating reader, it means being an omnivorous reader,” he explains.

The orginal article.