Summary of “Fresh voices: 50 writers you should read now”

Mark O’ConnellO’Connell’s captivating book about transhumanism and “Solving the problem of death”, To Be a Machine, which saw him navigate some of the stranger byways of Silicon Valley, was shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford prize, the Royal Society science book prize and recently the Wellcome prize.
Reni Eddo-LodgeEddo-Lodge’s debut book Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, published last year, has recently won the Jhalak prize – it was praised by the judges as a “Clarion call for action”, which “Not only holds up a mirror to contemporary Britain but also serves as a warning”.
His ambitious debut book New Dark Age comes out in July.
His ambitious debut book, New Dark Age, which argues that the digital era is radically shifting the boundaries of human experience, is out in July.
Nick DrnasoThe Illinois native picked up an LA Times book prize for his excellent 2016 debut, Beverly, a series of sad and lyrical interconnected stories.
Her second book, Force of Nature, which features the same investigator and concerns an elemental battle for survival in the unforgiving Australian wilderness, lives up to the promise of her stunning debut.
His first book for children, My Brother Is a Superhero, is subtitled “I could have been one too, except I needed a wee”; the story of comic geek Luke and his older brother Zack, unfairly given superpowers by a visiting alien, it won the Waterstones prize for children’s fiction in 2016, and its two sequels have since been flying off the shelves.
Her most recent book, Testosterone Rex, won the Royal Society science book of the year prize in 2017.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Exactly Does a Librarian Do? Everything.”

Every job in a library depends on someone else’s to function.
Libraries are buzzing hives filled with extremely busy, frazzled, overworked people.
Staff and Librarians work together to make sure that everything runs as smoothly as possible, which it NEVER, EVER DOES. Lots of different types of library work happens everywhere-new jobs crop up daily, thanks to evolving tech and shifting community needs-but there are some standard positions that remain eternal.
First of all, there’s the backbone of the library: technical services.
These are library employees who go home and drink a lot.
What I’m saying about library “Tropes” is that they apply to anyone who works in a library because you have to know how to do everyone else’s job.
Librarianship is the understanding that maintaining a library is a shared responsibility.
Libraries are community spaces for patrons as well as for library staff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “6 Must-Read Books That Will Unlock Your Inner Mental Strength”

What are the best books to read for mental strength? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.
There are no quick fixes or easy hacks for mental strength.
Over the years, I’ve picked up a number of great books about the mental game, the mind-body connection, and the secrets of learning new skills.
I’ve grouped the first three books together because they all reflect on the same aspects of the mental game-the connection between your conscious mind, your subconscious, and your performance.
One of the most interesting points Ericsson makes is about mental representations.
As people increase their skill levels, they begin to see things differently, breaking representations of physical objects into different “Chunks.” They recognize patterns and develop much more sophisticated mental representations.
If you’re interested in the mental game for personal or professional reasons, each of these books is useful in it’s own way.
Your mental effort is meant to change your behaviors, which in turn, helps you reach your goals and build your mental strength.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Slightly Embarrassing Love for Jack Kerouac”

Every year on or around March 12th, acolytes of the Beat writer Jack Kerouac cluster at the Flamingo Sports Bar in St. Petersburg, Florida, to celebrate his birthday.
Two local acolytes, Pat Barmore and Pete Gallagher, have been organizing Jack Kerouac Night at the Flamingo for five years.
“The ghost of Jack Kerouac is definitely here,” Barmore announced at the start of the evening.
Kerouac had just turned twenty-nine when he started writing the book in earnest.
Most covers of “On the Road” feature a grainy, black-and-white photograph of a young Kerouac looking rakish and cavalier.
“Jack Kerouac, author, artist, cult hero, was watching Walter Cronkite on the evening news, volume turned silent, while Handel’s Messiah blared from the record player. He was smoking Camels, drinking whiskey from a medicine vial and chasing it with Falstaff beer in a half-quart can,” the paper later reported.
There have been thoughtful efforts by Friends of the Jack Kerouac House, the nonprofit run by Barmore and Gallagher, to turn the house into a museum.
Kerouac is buried in Lowell-when I visited his grave a couple years back, it was covered with wine bottles and pens-but he spent his last moments in St. Petersburg.

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Summary of “Why Reading Books Should be Your Priority, According to Science”

More than a quarter-26 percent-of American adults admit to not having read even part of a book within the last year.
If you’re part of this group, know that science supports the idea that reading is good for you on several levels.
Reading fiction can help you be more open-minded and creative.
According to research conducted at the University of Toronto, study participants who read short story fiction experienced far less need for “Cognitive closure” compared with counterparts who read non-fiction essays.
“Although nonfiction reading allows students to learn the subject matter, it may not always help them in thinking about it,” the authors write.
That’s according to Yale researchers who studied 3,635 people older than 50 and found that those who read books for 30 minutes daily lived an average of 23 months longer than non-readers or magazine readers.
Apparently, the practice of reading books creates cognitive engagement which improves lots of things, including vocabulary, thinking skills and concentration.
Reading 50 books a year is something you can actually accomplish.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Retain More of Every Book You Read”

For most people, the ultimate goal of reading a nonfiction book is to actually improve your life by learning a new skill, understanding an important problem, or looking at the world in a new way.
It’s important to read books, but it is just as important to remember what you read and put it to good use.
Having searchable book notes is essential for returning to ideas easily.
Typing notes while reading a print book can be annoying because you are always putting the book down and picking it back up.
I like to place the book on a book stand, which makes it much easier to type out a long quote or keep my hands free while reading.
As I read Mastery by George Leonard, I realized that while this book was about the process of improvement, it also shed some light on the connection between genetics and performance.
How would I describe the book to a friend? What are the main ideas? If I was going to implement one idea from the book right now, which one would it be?
In many cases, I find that I can usually get just as much useful information from reading my one-paragraph summary and reviewing my notes as I would if I read the entire book again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Black Kids Don’t Want to Read About Harriet Tubman All the Time”

The typical children’s picture books featuring black characters focus on the degradation and endurance of our people.
Regardless of what the publishing industry seems to think, our babies don’t spend their days thinking about Harriet Tubman, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and black bodies swinging; they’re excited about what the tooth fairy will leave under their pillows, contemplating their first ride on the school bus, looking for dragons in their closets.
White children, too, deserve – and need – to see black characters that revel in the same human experiences that they do.
They didn’t get how black Baptist church communities devote themselves to nurturing children in ways beyond the Bible.
We published “Early Sunday Morning” last year, and many of the black parents and children who are buying it now have told me they are grateful for the story.
Color is of no consequence to the stories, but it still matters to black children looking for themselves in the pages.
The success of these books proves that parents, teachers, librarians and children are craving stories that celebrate the humanity and everyday experiences of black children and families.
If the same editors at the same publishing houses are pushing the same tales about Harriet Tubman, Dr. King, Muhammad Ali, and how black people “Overcame,” often written and illustrated by white writers and artists, well, they will have missed the opportunity to really nourish our children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Sincere Is “The Bachelor”?”

In the summer of 1999, the young television producer Mike Fleiss had already achieved some early success making tacky compilation reality shows such as “Shocking Behavior Caught on Tape” and “World’s Scariest Police Shootouts,” when he had an idea for a game show, in which a wealthy man would select a winner from a group of fifty wedding-gown-clad women, propose, and then marry her.
An entertainment journalist at the Los Angeles Times and a longtime fan of the show, Kaufman has procured damning production notes, revealing the show’s behind-the-scenes manipulation of participants, beginning with the ground rules established at the Agoura Hills, California, mansion where “The Bachelor” is filmed.
Like Kaufman, the Canadian poet and academic Suzannah Showler is a self-professed fan of the show, and she has also recently written a book about it, “Most Dramatic Ever: The Bachelor.” Unlike Kaufman, Showler didn’t talk to any sources, because, as she writes, “Uh, I didn’t really want to.” Instead, she studies the show using the tools of literary analysis, treating it as a text whose form provides meaning.
Less attuned to the motivations of individual actors, Showler is more interested in interrogating the ways in which the show works systematically-analyzing how the contestants’ life traumas are, as a rule, converted into connection, creating an economy where “Confessional narrative is a form of Bachelor currency.” In recent years, she suggests, the producers have increasingly allowed reality to enter the insular spectacle of the show.
Such intrusions are carefully calibrated to imply that the show’s authenticity is total, Showler proposes, while the producers carefully control how many of its seams they will expose.
How sincere is a show, they ask, that professes to be about true emotions while manipulating its participants? And what is the right amount of emotional distance that viewers should be able keep from “The Bachelor”? Nearly twenty years ago, in her groundbreaking book “No Logo,” Naomi Klein referred to a type of engagement with popular culture that she called “Ironic consumption,” wherein people, realizing their inability to detach from the often idiotic, occasionally poisonous products of capitalism, partake instead of these products’ pleasures while keeping a sense of agency and humor about it.
Viewers such as herself, Showler writes, are “Aware of the preposterousness of the situation” presented on the show, and of its pandering to gendered and racial stereotypes; and yet, she writes, “I fucking love The Bachelor.” For her part, Kaufman notes that “No one takes a show about twenty-five women vying for one man seriously”; and yet, if given the chance to try out for the show, she writes, “I WOULD STILL. FUCKING. APPLY.” This admission is followed by another reversal: “That’s pretty dark, right? What is wrong with me? Why do I want to be that girl?” The fault lines between enjoyment and irony, critique and complicity, are treacherous; the back-and-forth is ongoing, insistent, recursive.
The enjoyment one can glean from the show relies on this relatability, but also on the hairline gap between true emotions and interactions and their onscreen representations, and the ability to tell the difference between the two-to identify the way the artificial structures that the show puts in place do not make up the entire story.

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Summary of “E.O. Wilson on the Upside of Introversion, the Limits of IQ, and Where Ideas Really Come From”

One of these bestsellers is Wilson’s Letters to a Young Scientist, which distills 60 years of teaching into a wonderful array of unintuitive and surprising thoughts on creativity, innovation, and scientific progress.
You never finish a book as quite the same person, and - much like how bacteria inject and transfer fragments of DNA to one another - the best books transfer a part of the author’s philosophy into your own head.In this essay, I explore several ideas from Wilson’s book that stopped me, changed me, challenged me, and - most importantly - made me think.
We think Darwin had an IQ of about 130.In contrast, Wilson says people who score too high may end up “Working as auditors and tax consultants.”
“One reason could be that IQ-geniuses have it too easy in their early training. They don’t have to sweat the science courses they take in college. They find little reward in the necessarily tedious chores of data-gathering and analysis. They choose not to take the hard roads to the frontier, over which the rest of us, the lesser intellectual toilers, must travel.”Of course, Wilson admits this is pure speculation.
Maybe being too smart keeps you from doing the hard work a scientist needs to succeed? Who knows.
Wilson also challenges our stereotypical image of a genius scientist writing formulas on a blackboard.
“Pioneers in science only rarely make discoveries by extracting ideas from pure mathematics. Most of the stereotypical photographs of scientists studying rows of equations written on blackboards are instructors explaining discoveries already made. Real progress comes in the field writing notes, at the office amid a litter of doodled paper, in the corridor struggling to explain something to a friend, at lunchtime, eating alone, or in a garden while walking. To have a eureka moment requires hard work. And focus. A distinguished researcher once commented to me that a real scientist is someone who can think about a subject while talking to his or her spouse about something else.”Theory alone is not enough.
For many more interesting ideas on hard work, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation, check out Wilson’s Letters to a Young Scientist.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Read More Books”

When people ask me how I read so many books, they’re usually fishing for a speed reading technique that will allow their brains to swallow books whole.
Being amazed at how many books I read in a year would be like being amazed at how many leaky faucets a plumber fixed in a year.
With that said, in addition to the books I read specifically for the Art of Manliness last year, I also managed to read 2-3 books every month for pleasure.
So the #1 secret to reading more is to spend more time reading.
What’s more, studies suggest that reading comprehension increases when you read an analog book compared to reading on digital devices.
As mentioned above, when people ask me how I read so many books, they often assume I’m speed reading.
If you’ve read one personal development book you’ve read them all.
I know a lot about WWII history because I’ve read a lot of books about WWII. I know a lot about Theodore Roosevelt because I’ve read a lot of books about Theodore Roosevelt.

The orginal article.