Summary of “We’re Going to Need More Gabrielle Union”

Ms. Union nodded, and soon everyone in the room was low-humming to Tina Turner’s classic “What’s Love Got to Do With It?”.Who needs a heart when a heart can be broken?
End-of-the-line people were especially raw, Ms. Union said, as if their traumatic event just happened.
“We’re Going to Need More Wine” contains Ms. Union’s own heart-wrenching, deeply personal stories: about her infertility struggles, her childhood during which she lived in the all-white Pleasanton, Calif., for the school year and spent summers with her grandmother and cousins in a predominantly black neighborhood in North Omaha.
On Oct. 17, the day the book was released, about two weeks after the Harvey Weinstein story broke, Ms. Union told Robin Roberts during a segment on “Good Morning America” that she has been repeating her sexual assault story “With the goal of never having to hear ‘me too’ again.”
Ms. Union said that in her tour, only certain airports displayed the book, and that she had heard from readers that they had asked for it in certain cities, only to find it was still in stacks on the floor or in carts in the back.
Kima Jones, the founder of Jack Jones Literary Arts, a publicity company, and who mostly represents black authors – including the Pulitzer Prize winner Tyehimba Jess and the PEN America prize winner Rion Amilcar Scott – was not surprised that Ms. Union, who is not her client, felt “We’re Going to Need More Wine” received inadequate support.
Ms. Jones wondered if the glamorous aspects of Ms. Union’s life might lead sellers to underestimate the gravitas of “We’re Going to Need More Wine.”.
“There’s actually no reason we shouldn’t be talking about Gabrielle Union’s book beside Roxane Gay’s work or Leslie Jamison or Maggie Nelson’s work or any of the other women who are talking as critics of popular culture.”

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Summary of “5 amazing books I read this year”

Although I’m lucky that I get to meet with a lot of interesting people and visit fascinating places through my work, I still think books are the best way to explore new topics that interest you.
This year I picked up books on a bunch of diverse subjects.
Another good book I read recently is The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein.
I’ve written longer reviews about some of the best books I read this year.
If you’re looking to curl up by the fireplace with a great read this holiday season, you can’t go wrong with one of these.
If you want a good understanding of how the issues that cause poverty are intertwined, you should read this book about the eviction crisis in Milwaukee.
Most of the books I’ve read and movies I’ve seen about the Vietnam War focused on the American perspective.
It’s not the easiest book to read, but at the end you’ll feel smarter and better informed about how energy innovation alters the course of civilizations.

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Summary of “The best books of 2017”

If you’re anything like me, there were so very many books published this year that looked amazing but you didn’t get around to reading.
Well, thanks to all the best-of-the-year lists coming out, we’re getting a second crack at the ol’ onion.
Tyler Cowen, who samples over 1800 books a year, shared his Must Reads of 2017, a list that is mostly nonfiction and dominated by male authors.
Lee’s stunning novel, her second, chronicles four generations of an ethnic Korean family, first in Japanese-occupied Korea in the early 20th century, then in Japan itself from the years before World War II to the late 1980s.
Their tippy top pick appeared on several other lists as well: Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann, which I read and very much enjoyed.
Update: Bill Gates famously loves to read and has published a list of five “Amazing books” he read this year.
Tyler Cowen followed up his mostly nonfiction list for Bloomberg with one of just fiction.
I read them earlier this year and while I enjoyed them at the time, my esteem has grown steadily throughout the year.

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Summary of “writers choose books to give to their younger selves”

So the books I would give to my younger self would all be non-fiction, aimed at undermining the automatic prejudices of a white postwar English suburbanite.
Books about the true nature of war, empire and race; about the true nature of politics and economics, and how class, money and power are connected.
That’s another thing: I’d also give my younger self some truthful books about sex.
Often, the books were read and read again in preparation for exams and though I was certainly not uncritical, I was zealously protective of the books I loved and perhaps a more generous and forgiving reader than I would be if I were coming to Hardy or Dickens, Orwell or Scott Fitzgerald for the first time in middle age.
To be honest, Ada was beyond me but the book I’d give to my teenage self would be another Nabokov – King, Queen, Knave.
There are books that change the way you think, and books that change the way you see the world.
I’m generally a great believer in books turning up when they’re supposed to.
The two books I regret not reading earlier were both things that I’d heard from critics weren’t worth troubling with – Thackeray’s The History of Pendennis and Conrad’s Chance.

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Summary of “11 Psychology Books That Will Improve Your Work and Life”

Enter the Positive Psychology Program, quite possibly the best positive psychology resource on the Web.
Co-founders Seph Fontane, an entrepreneur with a background in online marketing, and Hugo Alberts, professor of psychology at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, teamed up to gift us with a one-stop shop that includes blogs, courses, exercises, quotes, conferences, and a database of top positive psychology researchers.
In this outstanding blog, Fontane offers up a comprehensive “Living list” of positive psychology books for newcomers, hardcore fans of the movement, and anyone in between.
Csikszentmihalyi is an expert on getting into a state of “Flow,” and one of the pioneers of positive psychology.
Seligman, commonly known as the founder of positive psychology and a leading authority in the field, wrote this seminal book as a “Handbook aimed at introducing people to positive psychology concepts that they can use to increase their own well-being.”
This handbook is a great option for people struggling to achieve greater positivity in their life, or just anyone looking for actionable ways positive psychology research can help them.
Ben-Shahar is an author, serial entrepreneur, and lecturer who taught two of the largest classes in Harvard University’s history-Positive Psychology and the Psychology of Leadership.
In it, TED talk sensation Shawn Achor uses stories and case studies from his work with thousands of Fortune 500 executives in 42 countries to explain how we can reprogram our brains to become more positive in order to gain a competitive edge at work.

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Summary of “From Politics to Scandals, Sports Seem to Speak to Our Times”

The popularity of the rediscovered historical sports narrative, la “Seabiscuit” and “The Boys in the Boat,” has sent microfilm reels spinning, and Roseanne Montillo’s FIRE ON THE TRACK: Betty Robinson and the Triumph of the Early Olympic Women brings to light the accomplishments of women track athletes of nearly a century ago, who struggled to overcome old-boy resistance and misogynistic discrimination in pursuing their goals.
I found a balm for Sharapovian self-absorption in Simon Critchley’s slim WHAT WE THINK ABOUT WHEN WE THINK ABOUT SOCCER, whose title is an obvious nod to Haruki Murakami’s “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running” and whose green cover seems copied from last year’s David Foster Wallace collection of tennis writing, “String Theory.” I admit to being a sucker for this kind of intellectual maundering about the meaning of sports, but I know plenty of sports fans can’t stand it.
My favorite book of the bunch, and the one that best captures the American sports landscape in these times, is not about any competition on the field but about the landscape-clearing constructions where the games take place.
THE ARENA: Inside the Tailgating, Ticket-Scalping, Mascot-Racing, Dubiously Funded, and Possibly Haunted Monuments of American Sport, by the freelance writer Rafi Kohan, is smart, readable, deeply reported and researched, engagingly personal, funny and often surprisingly poignant.
Kohan traverses the country from Green Bay’s Lambeau Field to New York’s Citi Field to San Diego’s Petco Park, embedding with the stadium Everymen and Everywomen who are the nobodies of the sports world.
Amid a section on the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium in Arlington, Texas, Kohan describes over-the-top amenities like a $15 million sculpture by Anish Kapoor, but the section also undertakes a comprehensive, cogent survey of the literature on stadium economics.
Kohan’s penultimate chapter is called “Sex. War. America,” and it covers the way that sports has appropriated and intermixed that triad to tease out emotion and profit, portrayed memorably in Ben Fountain’s novel “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,” based on the Dallas Cowboys’ 2004 Thanksgiving Day halftime show.
Fountain tells him, “Just seeing the display of militarism, American exceptionalism, pop music, soft-core porn all mixed together in this kind of crazy to-do – I started feeling like it was its own kind of voodoo.” Kohan also reminds us of a 2015 report from Senators Jeff Flake and John McCain revealing undisclosed payments from the Department of Defense to teams in order to fund military tributes, what Kohan calls “Camouflaged propaganda.” The issue, for the senators and others, was one of transparency.

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Summary of “Best books of 2017”

This truly is one of the best books I’ve read in years: funny, outrageous, touching, intimate, glorious.
I like most of the books I read but, now and again, I read one I wish I’d written myself.
I’ve barely started reading The White Book by Han Kang, but I can already tell it will be one of my books of the year.
A man recently claimed that 2017 had been “a thin year” for poetry; this has certainly not been the experience of attentive readers.
In the first annus horribilis of Trump, I found myself reading more periodicals than books – and small magazines rather than the mainstream journals.
The linked stories in Elizabeth Strout’s Anything Is Possible are among the best fiction I’ve read this year, and the poems in Simon Armitage’s The Unaccompanied the best verse.
I think it’s one of the finest books I’ve yet read. Then there’s Sebastian Barry’s Days Without End and Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire.
What have you enjoyed reading in 2017? Send your choices in 150 words or fewer to readers.

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Summary of “A Wave of New Fiction From Nigeria, as Young Writers Experiment With New Genres”

A new wave of thematically and stylistically diverse fiction is emerging from the country, as writers there experiment with different genres and explore controversial subjects like violence against women, polygamy and the rise of the Islamist militant group Boko Haram.
Rather than selling publication rights to American publishing houses, as most foreign publishers do, Cassava Republic prints and distributes its titles to American booksellers through Consortium, a book distributor based in Minnesota.
When Ms. Bakare-Yusuf co-founded Cassava Republic in Abuja in 2006, her primary goal was to publish Nigerian writers who had gained stature in the West but weren’t being read at home.
More than a decade later, Cassava Republic has published more than 50 titles, and has expanded into romance, crime, memoir, fantasy, science fiction and children’s books.
Cassava Republic has published eight books in the United States, including children’s books, crime novels and literary fiction, a nonfiction book about the West African music scene and “Longthroat Memoirs,” a food memoir by Yemisi Aribisala, which came out this month.
The novel, which was published in Nigeria this spring, was shortlisted for Britain’s Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, and received ecstatic reviews in The Guardian and The New York Times.
Writers and publishers in Nigeria still face significant obstacles.
The minimum wage in Nigeria hovers around $59 a month, and a new book costs around $8.Despite such hurdles, Nigeria’s publishing industry has blossomed in recent years, following the country’s return to democracy in 1999 after decades of military dictatorship.

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Summary of “Best books of 2017”

I’ve read some brilliant books this year, but a few stand out for me.
Can’t we talk about all my unread new books? I’m a late adopter; the more I’m told to read something, the longer it dawdles downstairs, waiting for that unquantifiable moment of ripeness.
The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan is, like all of his books, wildly entertaining and enlightening, challenging perceptions.
Numerous books have shown me how utterly ignorant I am about most creatures I share this planet with, but none humbled me more than What a Fish Knows by Jonathan Balcombe.
The product of many years of detailed archival research, Wilson’s book is without question the best one-volume history of the Raj currently in print.
There are two 2017 books of nonfiction that have really stayed with me.
My favourite books of 2017 were, first, Elmet by Fiona Mozley.
George Saunders’s Lincoln in the Bardo is one of the books where the jacket description gets it right: they use the word “Kaleidoscopic” to describe this ingenious, polyphonic structure that is at once as entrancing as it is beautiful.

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Summary of “100 Notable Books of 2017”

The new novel by the author of “The Reluctant Fundamentalist” and “How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia” mixes global unrest with a bit of the fantastic.
In his delightful first story collection, the author of the National Book Award-winning novel “The Good Lord Bird” continues to explore race, masculinity, music and history.
What if human beings are neither inevitable nor ultimate? That’s the premise of Erdrich’s fascinating new novel.
Egan’s engaging novel tells overlapping stories, but is most fundamentally about a young woman who works at the Brooklyn Naval Yard during World War II.MRS. OSMOND. By John Banville.
Ward’s novel, which won the National Book Award, combines aspects of the American road novel and the ghost story with an exploration of the long aftershocks of a hurricane.
Jemisin won a Hugo Award for each of the first two novels in her Broken Earth trilogy.
In the second novel of a planned trilogy, Cusk continues the story of Faye, a writer and teacher who is recently divorced and semi-broke.
Jasanoff uses Conrad’s novels and his biography to tell the history of that moment, one that mirrors our own.

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