Summary of “How the ‘brainy’ book became a publishing phenomenon”

In seeking to understand the reasons for the book’s unusually protracted shelf life, we uncover important messages about our moment in history, about the still-vital place of reading in our culture, and about the changing face of publishing.
The book is Sapiens, by the Israeli academic Yuval Noah Harari, published in the UK in September 2014.
Sapiens has become a publishing phenomenon and its wild success is symptomatic of a broader trend in our book-buying habits: a surge in the popularity of intelligent, challenging nonfiction, often books that are several years old.
“I had witnessed the mainstreaming of feminist writing with Caitlin Moran and Laura Bates,” she says, “And it became clear to me that a book about race was the next logical step. There’s lots of great writing in the States about race but this gaping hole in the UK, and it’s a subject that people here want to understand. I just knew that Reni could lead the charge, that she’d written a handbook for understanding race in this country.” It was important also that Eddo-Lodge’s book spoke to a whole new market of readers.
“They know their customers,” Mark Richards says, “And they know they can make books happen. Prisoners of Geography was made by them – a book from quite a small publisher, not particularly noticed on initial publication – but they realised what a brilliant synthesis it was, and to what extent it helped explain a lot of what’s happening in the world now. And once they get behind a book, other booksellers will often follow.” O’Brien agrees.
“There’s a lot of recent historical nonfiction that has been given a bump by Waterstones, particularly their book of the month promotions. And it’s often stuff from tiny publishers which, given that initial boost, can then establish itself in the charts and stay there for a very long time.”
“We made Prisoners of Geography book of the month in the summer of 2016. For the first few months we had 90% of the market for that book, and then for a long time after that we had over 50%. Now it’s much less, because everyone has got hold of it, but we’re fine with that. It’s the book I see most around and about, when I’m on the bus or whatever and it makes me very happy to know where it started.” The path of Sapiens was similar: Waterstones plucked it from relative obscurity, making it book of the month in May 2015 and helping to propel its initial success.
“Sapiens” Daunt says, “Would have had an expectation of selling a few thousand in hardback, maybe 5,000 copies in paperback. It’s a worthy book and a necessary book, but not one you’d expect bestseller status for and a publisher would therefore never pay to have that book piled up in front of people. When Waterstones stopped taking payment for putting books in front of people it liberated us to follow our bookselling instincts.”

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Summary of “Tsundoku: The art of buying books and never reading them”

Do you have a habit of picking up books that you never quite get around to reading?
So when put together, “Tsundoku” has the meaning of buying reading material and piling it up.
“Which is likely to be satirical, about a teacher who has lots of books but doesn’t read them.”
While this might sound like tsundoku is being used as an insult, Prof Gerstle said the word does not carry any stigma in Japan.
Hands up if you regularly used the word “Bibliomania” before reading this article.
While the two words may have similar meanings, there is one key difference: Bibliomania describes the intention to create a book collection, tsundoku describes the intention to read books and their eventual, accidental collection.
Strictly speaking, the word doku does mean reading, so tsundoku should probably only be used when discussing literature.
Some people even joked the service should rename their annual week of discounting the “Steam Tsundoku Sale”.

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Summary of “No, you probably don’t have a book in you”

When people talk about “Having a book in them,” or when people tell others they should write a book, what they really mean is I bet someone, but probably not me because I already heard it, would pay money to hear this story.
A book has a beginning, middle, and an end that keeps the reader invested for the five, six, ten hours it can take to read a book, because if it gets boring in the middle, most people stop reading.
Writing a book that people will pay money for or take a trip to the library to read, requires an awareness few storytellers have.
A publisher doesn’t really want book two until they see how book number one is selling.
Publishers take a financial risk on a book, because no one knows how a book is going to sell until it’s on shelves, and very successful authors help pay the bills for the less successful books.
No one deserves to be published just because they completed a book.
Writing a book that someone else wants to read is running your fastest marathon.
Just be careful when well-meaning, though wholly uninformed, people say you should write a book.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 self-made millionaires and the books that changed their finances”

Millionaires come from all walks of life, but research shows they share some key habits that helped them climb at the top of their financial games.
Upping their financial IQs and reading are two big ones-so it’s no surprise many millionaires credit books with helping them shape their money mind-set.
Want a few suggestions to add to your summer reading list? Here, seven self-made millionaires share the one book that changed their finances for the better.
Tanja Hester, 38, early retiree in Lake Tahoe, Calif., who hit millionaire status in her mid-30s with calculated goal-setting, saving and investing.
“Because of the lessons I learned from ‘The Millionaire Next Door,’ my husband and I were able to stop wasting money on stuff and start saving for things we valued: paying off our mortgage, funding our children’s education and consistently investing for retirement.”
Clare Dubé, 51, financial therapist in Madison, Conn., who joined the millionaires’ club in 2000 through values-led budgeting, targeted retirement planning and real-estate investing.
Ordinary people can become millionaires by doing relatively simple things-like using tax-advantaged retirement accounts and pushing yourself to save a little extra each month-over a long period of time.
“‘The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing,’ based on the philosophies of Vanguard founder John Bogle, completely changed my financial outlook.

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Summary of “How to Improve Your Kids’ Reading Comprehension”

If you’re like me, you dive into book after book with abandon.
It turns out that by plowing through stories, we may be missing a key step: prediction.
When your kid takes the time to contemplate what he’s about to read, making predictions based on what he already knows, he’ll be more invested in the story and more likely to understand and retain the material.
Show them the cover and ask, “What do you think this book will be about? Why?”.Take a “Picture walk,” as Kriegel suggests.
Flip through the pages of illustrated book, and without reading any words, let them to form their own ideas about the story.
Use Post-Its to cover important words in the story, and see if they can guess what those words are when they land upon them.
In the middle of a story, stop and ask them what they think is going to happen on the next page.
After the final page, ask, “If you could write the next chapter, what would happen?” It helps them to stay curious even after the story ends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a cabal of romance writers cashed in on Amazon Kindle Unlimited”

Shortly thereafter, Amazon rolled out the next iteration of Kindle Unlimited – authors would now be paid per page read. Many self-publishers, says Gaughran, moved on to producing books that were thousands of pages long.
Either way, book stuffing plagues the romance genre on Kindle Unlimited, with titles that come in at 2000 or even 3000 pages.
It’s not clear to what extent Valderrama was involved in book stuffing or other techniques, or how many of her other clients engaged in the kind of marketing strategies Willink says she told her about at RWA. Her current roster of clients includes multiple authors whom sources in the romance community named as prolific book-stuffers and who have regularly published books clocking in at a thousand pages or more, including Cassandra Dee.
There are over 5 million books available via Kindle, with over a million books available on the Kindle Unlimited system.
As described earlier, Carter’s books were removed from Amazon in June, for reasons that Amazon declines to explain.
In the Kindle Unlimited program – where readers pay a $9.99 monthly subscription to “Check out” as many books in the program as they want – a reader can indulge any passing impulse to peek behind a cover.
Scattered throughout the top featured titles in the Romance category for Kindle Unlimited are books labeled “Compilation,” “Anthology,” “Collection,” or “Box Set,” running thousands of pages long.
In June, one of the top books in romance was Cassandra Dee’s Pregnant By My Boss: A Romance Compilation, clocking in at over a thousand pages.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Best summer books 2018, as picked by writers”

It’s one of the best evocations of the grieving process I’ve read and is written in a fluid engaging style that draws you in to the protagonist Holly’s world.
Ashleigh Young’s collection of smart, funny, insightful and unexpected essays, Can You Tolerate This?, has a bright yellow cover, making it perfect summer reading.
Three Poems by Hannah Sullivan is the best first collection I’ve read for a long time: moving, technically adroit, clever in all the right ways, and full of brilliant small-scale effects as well as large achievements.
It reminded me of what it was like to lie reading by torchlight late at night, when camping in the summer.
The book brings both city and period to colourful life and is a joy to read. It’s a collaboration between seasoned novelist Chris Brookmyre and his wife, consultant anaesthetist Marisa Haetzman.
Published in translation last year, it’s an admirably slim book – you could read it in one sitting – and for me it conjured up a whole world.
In the world of children’s books, I can’t wait to read Hilary McKay’s The Skylarks’ War, set in the approaching shadow of the first world war.
I’ve already read Tishani Doshi’s poetry collection Girls Are Coming Out of the Woods but I know I’ll return to it many times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Fly the World’s Best Business Class for Less Than Coach”

If you have airline miles or credit-card points that transfer to frequent-flier programs, they’re bookable for less than the cost of a coach seat.
Why you want to fly it: Back in March 2017, Qatar Airways Co. was the first airline to install suite-style seats with retractable doors in business class, when it introduced its innovative QSuites.
How to book it for less than coach: Redeeming miles through Qatar’s own Privilege Club frequent-flier program isn’t the best way to book a QSuite-not since the carrier raised award prices in May. Instead, pay for your seat with American Airlines Inc. AAdvantage miles, British Airways Avios, Cathay Pacific Asia Miles, or other OneWorld alliance currencies.
American Airlines Inc. might be the best of the bunch: It charges just 70,000 miles each way to fly business between the U.S. and Doha.
How to book it for less than coach: American AAdvantage miles are your best choice here.
How to book it for less than coach: United Airlines Inc.’s MileagePlus program is a transfer partner of Chase Ultimate Rewards; expect to pay 60,000 miles each way from the U.S. to Europe, or 70,000-75,000 miles to Asia, depending on where you are traveling to.
Why you want to fly it: They’re not brand-new-Air France-KLM SA’s Air France unit introduced its latest business class seats in 2014-but the carrier’s lie-flat, blue-white-and-red seats offer a truly French experience from gate to gate.
How to book it for less than coach: Singapore’s own KrisFlyer mileage program is by far the easiest way to book business class awards on the airline-though partners such as United and Air Canada have lately been offering some availability.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Only Read A Few Books In 2018, Read These”

If you don’t read the book, at least please read about it.
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell The book is spectacular.
Given the divisiveness that we are facing as a society - that became painfully clear in 2016 - this is one of the most urgent and important book you need to read next year.
It’s also easy to be disillusioned by politics right now but for me, getting lost in these Lyndon Johnson books has been a helpful and educational process.
Mr. Eternity by Aaron Thier / The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas These books really have nothing to do with the events of 2016 but they are long and entertaining and they will make you forget your problems for the next 12 months.
Because the actual book is a 1,200 page epic of some of the most brilliant, beautiful and complicated storytelling ever put to paper.
What a book! When I typed out my notes after finishing this book, it ran some 3,000 words.
Like to Read?I’ve created a list of 15 books you’ve never heard of that will alter your worldview and help you excel at your career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Only Read A Few Books In 2018, Read These”

If you don’t read the book, at least please read about it.
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell The book is spectacular.
Given the divisiveness that we are facing as a society - that became painfully clear in 2016 - this is one of the most urgent and important book you need to read next year.
It’s also easy to be disillusioned by politics right now but for me, getting lost in these Lyndon Johnson books has been a helpful and educational process.
Mr. Eternity by Aaron Thier / The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas These books really have nothing to do with the events of 2016 but they are long and entertaining and they will make you forget your problems for the next 12 months.
Because the actual book is a 1,200 page epic of some of the most brilliant, beautiful and complicated storytelling ever put to paper.
What a book! When I typed out my notes after finishing this book, it ran some 3,000 words.
Like to Read?I’ve created a list of 15 books you’ve never heard of that will alter your worldview and help you excel at your career.

The orginal article.