Summary of “The Inside Story of How McDonald’s Innovated the Quarter Pounder”

“McDonald’s new fresh-beef Quarter Pounder is hotter and juicier. It’ll leave you speech-less. I can almost feel that juice sizzling…. Oh baby, the melted cheese is hugging every corner of that grilled patty…. That cheese is so hot, so melty.”
It was timed to the arrival-at every one of the restaurant chain’s 14,000 U.S. outposts-of fresh, never-frozen beef patties in its signature Quarter Pounder burgers, a change that execs say has been as seismic for the company as the introduction of all-day breakfast, in 2015, or even the drive-through window, which McDonald’s began experimenting with in 1975.
Menu chief Linda VanGosen, who joined McDonald’s from Starbucks last year, works closely with chefs and food scientists at McDonald’s suppliers and keeps a close eye on food trends, which have to reach a certain level of mass appeal to make sense for McDonald’s.
McDonald’s began testing fresh-beef Quarter Pounders a few years ago at restaurants in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Dallas, markets selected because they are serious burger country.
On a late-spring Tuesday, not long after the new patty began being served nationwide, Christa Small, one of the company’s top operations executives and the person whose team was responsible for coming up with the procedures that make fresh beef possible, visits a McDonald’s near the old campus in Oak Brook.
In crafting the new Quarter Pounder, McDonald’s has made subtle improvements to the entire sandwich, adjusting grill time and the bun-toasting process, for example.
McDonald’s switched from batch cooking to preparing each Quarter Pounder when ordered.
To demonstrate, Small takes me to the other side of a McDonald’s counter and asks an associate for a Quarter Pounder.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Inside Story of How McDonald’s Innovated the Quarter Pounder”

“McDonald’s new fresh-beef Quarter Pounder is hotter and juicier. It’ll leave you speech-less. I can almost feel that juice sizzling…. Oh baby, the melted cheese is hugging every corner of that grilled patty…. That cheese is so hot, so melty.”
It was timed to the arrival-at every one of the restaurant chain’s 14,000 U.S. outposts-of fresh, never-frozen beef patties in its signature Quarter Pounder burgers, a change that execs say has been as seismic for the company as the introduction of all-day breakfast, in 2015, or even the drive-through window, which McDonald’s began experimenting with in 1975.
Menu chief Linda VanGosen, who joined McDonald’s from Starbucks last year, works closely with chefs and food scientists at McDonald’s suppliers and keeps a close eye on food trends, which have to reach a certain level of mass appeal to make sense for McDonald’s.
McDonald’s began testing fresh-beef Quarter Pounders a few years ago at restaurants in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Dallas, markets selected because they are serious burger country.
On a late-spring Tuesday, not long after the new patty began being served nationwide, Christa Small, one of the company’s top operations executives and the person whose team was responsible for coming up with the procedures that make fresh beef possible, visits a McDonald’s near the old campus in Oak Brook.
In crafting the new Quarter Pounder, McDonald’s has made subtle improvements to the entire sandwich, adjusting grill time and the bun-toasting process, for example.
McDonald’s switched from batch cooking to preparing each Quarter Pounder when ordered.
To demonstrate, Small takes me to the other side of a McDonald’s counter and asks an associate for a Quarter Pounder.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is the Beginning of the End of the Beef Industry”

Beyond Meat, the first of the Silicon Valley startups to use advanced technology to produce extremely meat-like burgers, had been ignored for its first few years, but in 2014, it released its Beast Burger, which was treated by the press and public as a slightly off-putting curiosity.
That product wasn’t very good-I compared it to Salisbury steak-and when Ethan Brown, Beyond Meat’s founder, announced his intention to end livestock production, you could almost hear the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association laughing in the background.
In the following years, Beyond Meat was joined by Impossible Foods, a more sophisticated startup with even more venture capital.
Resulting foot traffic was so strong that Burger King decided to serve the Impossible Whopper in all 7,200 restaurants, marking the moment when alt meat stopped being alt.
Big beef successfully lobbied for a labeling law in Missouri banning any products from identifying themselves as meat unless they are “Derived from harvested production livestock or poultry.” Similar labeling laws have passed or are pending in a dozen more states, most of them big ranching ones.
Beyond Meat’s products are in 15,000 grocery stores in the U.S., and its sales have more than doubled each year.
Most offerings made with Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are about a buck a burger more expensive.
More than anything Beyond Meat or Impossible Foods has accomplished, the true death knell for the cattlemen is how the mainstream food industry has embraced alt meat.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Impossible and Beyond Burgers made 2018 the year of vegan junk food”

The ubiquity of the Beyond Burger is part of one of 2018’s best movements: the mass proliferation of vegan junk food.
Not just any vegan junk food but mainstream vegan junk food, products engineered not to satisfy vegan-identified vegans, but to tempt regular omnivores who are interested in novelty, or climate change.
None of this is even to mention the Impossible Burger, the true icon of Our Year of Vegan Junk.
Not because the food is virtuous – the food is White Castle – but because it indicates a shift in how meat-and-potatoes Americans think about vegan food.
Vegan junk food does not demand devotion to any cause.
Many articles about vegan junk food will point out, alarmed, that this food actually isn’t that healthy.
Junk food isn’t the only fun vegan food – lots of vegan food is fun, I think – but for non-believers, it is a shortcut.
Vegan junk food is not elitist or unfamiliar or salad-like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Will Stanich’s Ever Reopen? Why America’s Best Burger Spot Closed Down”

Under the restaurant name, it says “Great hamburgers since 1949.” The mug was given to me by Steve Stanich on the day I told him that, after eating 330 burgers during a 30-city search, I was naming Stanich’s cheeseburger the best burger in America.
Can the NYC Steakhouse Survive? Five months later, in a story in The Oregonian, restaurant critic Michael Russell detailed how Stanich’s had been forced to shut down.
In the article, Steve Stanich called my burger award a curse, “The worst thing that’s ever happened to us.” He told a story about the country music singer Tim McGraw showing up one day, and not being able to serve him because there was a five hour wait for a burger.
On January 2, 2018, Stanich shut down the restaurant for what he called a “Two week deep cleaning.” Ten months later, Stanich’s is still closed.
Stanich’s burger could compete with any burger place in the country, but I’d be lying if I said the narrative didn’t push it over the top.
They might pay him lip service to his face, but they were never coming back so they had no problem going on Yelp or Facebook and denouncing the restaurant and saying that the burgers were bad. And then the health department came in and suggested they do some deep cleaning, and the combination of all of these factors led Stanich to close down the restaurant for what he genuinely thought would be two weeks.
Stanich showed me all the new things he’d put in while they’d been closed, and how they’d fixed up the bathrooms, and told me about how he’s kept on the coolers and the ice machines and everything this entire time, because if you shut that stuff down for long periods it will break.
As we stood and stared down at the black gravestone, Stanich told me a story about how his parents had started the restaurant in 1949 to help pay hospital bills after he was born prematurely.

The orginal article.

Summary of “McDonald’s is undergoing a massive transformation, starting with the Q”

“McDonald’s new fresh-beef Quarter Pounder is hotter and juicier. It’ll leave you speech-less. I can almost feel that juice sizzling…. Oh baby, the melted cheese is hugging every corner of that grilled patty…. That cheese is so hot, so melty.”
Over the course of interviews with five top executives, I never once heard anyone mention Shake Shack or In-N-Out by name, but McDonald’s has clearly been studying these chains-both of which serve fresh beef-along with their millennial customers who don’t find frozen patties appetizing.
“We were hearing from consumers that our burger wasn’t good enough, and we’ve seen a lot of trends around expectations of high quality,” says the company’s new chief marketing officer, Morgan Flatley, who arrived at McDonald’s from PepsiCo a year ago.
Fresh beef is just one element of a massive transformation underway at McDonald’s.
Menu chief Linda VanGosen, who joined McDonald’s from Starbucks last year, works closely with chefs and food scientists at McDonald’s suppliers and keeps a close eye on food trends, which have to reach a certain level of mass appeal to make sense for McDonald’s.
Eventually, McDonald’s determined that the burger was too dry and didn’t arrive hot enough, and executives discerned that the culprit in both cases was the flash-freezing process the patties had been subjected to.
McDonald’s declines to reveal the costs associated with the new patty, beyond saying that it is not appreciably more expensive to produce than the frozen version, and that consumers won’t see an increase in price.
On a late-spring Tuesday, not long after the new patty began being served nationwide, Christa Small, one of the company’s top operations executives and the person whose team was responsible for coming up with the procedures that make fresh beef possible, visits a McDonald’s near the old campus in Oak Brook.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Taste test: Burger robot startup Creator opens first restaurant – TechCrunch”

That’s just one way this startup, formerly known as Momentum Machines, wants to serve the world’s freshest cheeseburger for just $6. On June 27th, after eight years in development, Creator unveils its first robot restaurant before opening to the public in September.
Once you order your burger style through a human concierge on a tablet, a compressed air tube pushes a baked-that-day bun into an elevator on the right.
For now, the startup’s initial pre-set burger options include the classic-style Creator vs. The World with a mole Thousand Island special sauce, the oyster aioli Tumami Burger designed by Chef Tu of Top Chef, The Smoky with charred onion jam and the sunflower seed tahini Dad Burger from Chef Nick Balla of Bar Tartine.
“We spend more on our ingredients than any other burger restaurant.”
“We have an arm that pulls out the burgers, but that’s probably 5 percent of the complexity” of the full Creator robot run by 350 sensors, 50 actuators and 20 computers, Vardakostas scoffs.
Vardakostas says they’re basically the least healthy thing you can eat, noting they’re “Worse than donuts because there’s more surface area exposed to the frier.” But chefs told him some people simply wouldn’t eat a burger without them.
Creator’s fate won’t just be determined by the burger robot and the people who work alongside it.
“Our business model is pretty simple. We take a really good burger that people like and sell it for half the price.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Taste test: Burger robot startup Creator opens first restaurant – TechCrunch”

That’s just one way this startup, formerly known as Momentum Machines, wants to serve the world’s freshest cheeseburger for just $6. On June 27th, after eight years in development, Creator unveils its first robot restaurant before opening to the public in September.
Once you order your burger style through a human concierge on a tablet, a compressed air tube pushes a baked-that-day bun into an elevator on the right.
For now, the startup’s initial pre-set burger options include the classic-style Creator vs. The World with a mole Thousand Island special sauce, the oyster aioli Tumami Burger designed by Chef Tu of Top Chef, The Smoky with charred onion jam and the sunflower seed tahini Dad Burger from Chef Nick Balla of Bar Tartine.
“We spend more on our ingredients than any other burger restaurant.”
“We have an arm that pulls out the burgers, but that’s probably 5 percent of the complexity” of the full Creator robot run by 350 sensors, 50 actuators and 20 computers, Vardakostas scoffs.
Vardakostas says they’re basically the least healthy thing you can eat, noting they’re “Worse than donuts because there’s more surface area exposed to the frier.” But chefs told him some people simply wouldn’t eat a burger without them.
Creator’s fate won’t just be determined by the burger robot and the people who work alongside it.
“Our business model is pretty simple. We take a really good burger that people like and sell it for half the price.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where’s the beef? For Impossible Foods it’s in boosting burger sales and raising hundreds of millions – TechCrunch”

It’s a big vision with lots of implications for the world – from climate change and human health to challenging the massive, multi-billion dollar industries that depend on meat – and luckily for Impossible Foods, the company has managed to attract big-name investors with incredibly deep pockets to fund its meatless mission.
Impossible began selling its meat substitute back in 2016 with a series of launches at some of America’s fanciest restaurants in conjunction with the country’s most celebrated young chefs.
Impossible has plans to expand to Asia this year and is now selling its meat in more than 1,000 restaurants around the U.S. Some would argue that the meat substitute has found its legs in the fast-casual restaurant chains that now dot the country, serving up mass-marketed, higher price point gourmet burgers.
Restaurants including FatBurger, Umami Burger, Hopdoddy, The Counter, Gott’s and B Spot – the Midwest burger restaurant owned by Chef Michael Symon – all hawk Impossible’s meat substitute in an increasing array of combinations.
“Once people tried the burger they couldn’t believe that it was not meat,” says del Olmo.
Beyond Meat is selling through grocery stores like Whole Foods, in addition to partnerships of its own with chains like TGIFridays and celebrity backers like Leonardo DiCaprio.
Heme is present in most living things and, according to Impossible Foods, it’s the molecule that gives meat its flavor.
If Impossible Foods, Beyond Meat or any of their competitors that are working on developing cultured meat cells in a lab are successful, it has huge implications for the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hamburger: An American Lyric”

In 1993, the Boca Burger appeared, a veggie burger made from soy protein and wheat gluten.
Citizen Burger Bar in North Carolina proclaims, “A delicious burger is your right.” Following the trope, they identify the burger and beer as “Essential liberties.” Ray Kroc in the film The Founder gives a pep talk to the McDonald brothers-whom he will soon be undercutting-by echoing nationalist themes.
Before the Berlin Wall crumbled, the Soviet-run GDR desired to demonstrate its “With-it-ness” with a burger joint-offering, of course, a better burger than any in the West.
If Harold and Kumar traversed the United States in the 1970s with Charles Kuralt, they would have passed by bridge burgers, Cable burgers, Dixie burgers, Yankee Doodle burgers, Capital burgers, Penta burgers.
Or they might have chosen: “Grabba burgers, kinga burgers, lotta burgers, castle burgers, country burgers, bronco burgers, Broadway burgers, broiled burgers, beefnut burgers, bell burgers, plush burgers, prime burgers, flame burgers dude burgers, char burgers, tall boy burgers, golden burgers, 747 jet burgers, whiz burgers, nifty burgers, and thing burgers.”
Curators are found not only in art museums overseeing giant floor burgers; they can be found in restaurants where they are creating veggie burgers.
“Sometimes you see veggie burgers made with a hundred ingredients, a kitchen-sink burger,” said Chloe Coscarelli, the chef and co-owner of Chloe’s.
From references in popular culture to investors like Bill Gates seeking to find the non-animal burger that can feed the world, the burger’s identity is as malleable as that patty of protein itself before it is thrown on a grill.

The orginal article.