Summary of “When Working From Home Doesn’t Work”

For 20 years, it had been hiring the greats of modernism to erect buildings where scientists and salespeople could work shoulder-to-shoulder commanding the burgeoning computer industry.
To ease a logjam at the office mainframe, it installed boxy, green-screened terminals in the homes of five employees, allowing them to work from home.
“If what they’re looking to do is reduce productivity, lose talent, and increase cost, maybe they’re on to something,” says Kate Lister, the president of Global Workplace Analytics, which measures working from home.
There’s reason to regard the move as a signal, however faint, that telecommuting has reached its high-water mark-and that more is lost in working apart than was first apparent.
Letting Chinese call-center employees work from home boosted their productivity by 13 percent, a Stanford study reported.
If it’s personal productivity-how many sales you close or customer complaints you handle-then the research, on balance, suggests that it’s probably better to let people work where and when they want.
In one study of software developers, Waber, working alongside researchers from IBM, found that workers in the same office traded an average of 38 communications about each potential trouble spot they confronted, versus roughly eight communications between workers in different locations.
Talking with Purdie, I began to wonder whether the company was calling its employees back to an old way of working or to a new one-one that didn’t exist in 1979, when business moved at a more stately pace.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ari Emanuel, WME, and the Great Hollywood IPO That Wasn’t”

In 2009, the feisty start-up did the impossible and merged with-effectively swallowed up-the stalwart of Hollywood stalwarts, the William Morris Agency; still a formidable company, particularly in the music business, where Endeavor was weak.
In the absorption, Emanuel and William Morris Endeavor became the first true rival CAA had seen, eventually joining it along with UTA, ICM, and Paradigm in the five-part hegemony that has presided since.
The rivalry with CAA also created another comparison, between Emanuel and the great dealmaker of the previous generation, Ovitz.
In his 2018 memoir, Ovitz himself called Emanuel and Whitesell his “Real heirs.” One can take this as a swipe at his own former protégés or as an attempt to aggrandize himself by association with Emanuel’s building of the sort of multipronged media company he was never able to turn CAA into.
Former assistants gush, which is almost unheard of in Hollywood.
As WME grew, Emanuel hatched a plan to use a talent agency, of all things, to combat the tech interlopers awakening to Hollywood’s potential.
It’s a plan that demonstrates Emanuel’s singular place in Hollywood circa 2020.
In the Entourage version of Emanuel’s life, the character ends up taking over a studio and becoming, effectively, king of Hollywood.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Canada’s Warren Buffett’ Drives His Own Pickup Truck”

Jim Pattison visits a Pattison Agriculture dealership in Moosomin, Saskatchewan.
Jim Pattison roars through rural Saskatchewan in his silver pickup truck, barreling down the prairie road that runs arrow-straight to the horizon.
“We’re seeing more opportunities than we ever have,” says Pattison, steering confidently, his diminutive frame overwhelmed by the cavernous, black leather seats of his Ram 1500 Laramie truck.
Pattison is often dubbed Canada’s Warren Buffett-a trope that underscores how relatively unknown he remains outside Canada despite a conglomerate that operates in 85 countries across a dizzying array of industries: supermarkets, lumber, fisheries, disposable packaging for KFC, billboards across Canada and ownership of the No. 1 copyrighted best-seller of all time, the “Guinness World Records.” Believe it or not, he even owns the Ripley Entertainment Inc. empire.
“Back in Omaha, I’m known as the Jim Pattison of the United States,” Buffett quipped in December 2018 when he surprised Pattison onstage in Toronto as the Canadian billionaire was inducted into the country’s Walk of Fame.
Pattison has driven 1,700 kilometers from the Jim Pattison Group Inc. headquarters in Vancouver, across the towering Canadian Rockies to the prairies where he’s acquired four farm equipment companies to create Pattison Agriculture.
Pattison listens to the sales team at a Pattison Agriculture dealership in Moosomin.
Pattison drives his pickup truck through Saskatchewan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Most-Overlooked Tax Breaks and Deductions for the Self-Employed”

In recent years the IRS has come up with a simplified method that allows taxpayers to deduct $5 for every square foot that qualifies for the deduction.
There’s a tax deduction waiting if you drive your own car for business and it isn’t just for Uber or Lyft drivers.
If your total annual car costs are $5,000 and 20% of your miles were for business, then your deduction is $1,000.
Second, you get a deduction only to the extent your expenses exceed 7.5% of your adjusted gross income.
There’s a new tax deduction that debuted in 2018 that you may have heard about – it’s called the qualified business income deduction.
QBI is the net amount of income, gain, deduction and loss from the business included in your taxable income.
Again, it’s a complicated deduction but one well worth looking into if you’re self-employed.
A computer has a life of five years, for example, so you can write off the cost over five years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leaning In with Alex P. Keaton”

Buppie + ambition + x = a black female CEO of a Fortune 500 company.
In most cases, we were the only black women in our respective departments, catalysts for change in a small way, and we leaned on each other to cope with our loneliness and hurt.
Out of frustration and a need for fulfillment, some black women were walking away from secure lifestyles to explore new careers or start their own businesses, adjusting their American dreams.
Number of black female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, 1980-1999: 0.
Number of black female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, 2000-2019: 2*. * Mary Winston served as Interim CEO of Bed Bath & Beyond for a brief time in 2019.
The first black female CEO of a Fortune 500 firm, Ursula Burns, stepped down from the top job at Xerox in 2016.
Across America, black girls interested in business are dreaming about taking their place in CEO corner offices.
“We need you there.” Seeing a black woman at any level of power gives another black woman hope.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Loneliness, Depression, Burnout: How I Learned to Avoid the Worst Parts of Entrepreneurship”

One entrepreneur in particular who seemed to have it all was Tony Grebmeier, host of the Be Fulfilled Podcast and CEO of ShipOffers.
Much to my surprise during our talk, Grebmeier didn’t always have it all together.
Combining all of these factors led Grebmeier to prepare to take his life in 2008.
After “The knock” and finally admitting he needed help to his mom also, Grebmeier picked up more momentum and got on track to become his present day version.
Here are two key lessons that I learned from my talk with Grebmeier about how to navigate the tough terrains of entrepreneurship without it leading to loneliness, depression, and burnout.
As Grebmeier mentioned to me, one of the biggest mistakes that entrepreneurs make, which I’m still working on is to stop “Living on an island”.
One of Grebmeier’s key statements that stuck out to me was “I’ve spent a lifetime trying to look good to avoid feeling bad.”.
Whatever the case, as Grebmeier mentioned to me numerous times, it’s important to “Get out of your head and into your heart.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “44 Favorite Books of High Achievers”

Aha!: The Moments of Insight That Shape Our World by William B. Irvine “This book came to me in my formative business years as a recommendation from a fellow professor when I was teaching dental school and looking to transition to private practice. While the book was primarily for me to get my head around the”aha moment” as it relates to highly impressionable young dental students, it ended up awakening in me the very moment I was seeking to generate in others.
Humble Inquiry by Edgar Schein “Edgar Schein is one of the seminal researchers and authors of organizational culture. In his final series of books as an elder he shows how our leadership mindset needs to change from doing and telling to more of a humble mindset of listening, asking questions, and creating environments that are adaptive and collaborative. This is the first of three books along the humble inquiry theme, in addition to Humble Consulting and his future book Humble Leadership.”
The Other Side of Impossible by Susannah Meadows and Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why by Laurence Gonzales “Empowering and reinforcing perspectives for modern times. The former provides an encouraging account of people who take control of their lives and empower themselves in the face of challenging health issues. The second looks at the workings of the brain that control our behavior. Both are useful for choice and perspective with illness, relationships, deaths of loved ones, and work-life balance stress. These books provide a chance to recalibrate, rethink, and reassess our interpretation of degree of happiness and stress in our lives-and may leave us feeling more connected in the process.”
Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook by Gary Vaynerchuck “This book offers actionable insights into the paradigm shift that is today’s marketing of goods and services. I found great value in learning to understand where the prospective customer’s attention is at, and how to market using the most efficient platforms possible to reach them. Today the undervalued platforms are social media and influencer marketing. Basic tools and motivation to optimize your marketing spend as a marketing professional are clearly laid out in this book.”
Tools of the Titans by Tim Ferris “This book houses some of the greatest advice I’ve read about business, health, and more, from millionaires and billionaires. I like it because you don’t need to read front to back; you can skip around and read stories that are applicable to you for that moment. It’s brought me a lot of value and is probably the most marked up book I own. Tim has a way of always bringing real value, and this book is a testament to him being able to ask the perfect questions to highly respected individuals and ‘masters of their craft’ and get hugely valuable answers for his audience.”
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss “This book has been a favorite of mine since I was a child. The notion of taking charge of your own destiny and not being stuck or complacent has resonated throughout my career in the hospitality industry. To be successful in any endeavor, you can’t be afraid to go places and take risks, and I think the essence of this book can be applied to many goals in business.”
I come from a lineage of physicians and so I had to rely on books such as Rich Dad Poor Dad to teach me the value and strategy of growing my business and maintaining successful cash flow and having positive debt.
The book makes a compelling case for calculated risk-taking and a work hard, play hard approach to business, advice I’ve embraced throughout my own career as an entrepreneur.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Older Adults Are Starting New Businesses Like Never Before”

A growing number of older Americans are challenging the idea of traditional retirement, as more retirees decide they want to keep working or pursue passions after leaving the rat race behind: the number of Americans age 65 and over who continue to work has doubled since 1985, according to a study by United Income.
Look into a place like SCORE, which connects beginner entrepreneurs with business owners who have already built their own companies.
“Debt is a dream killer,” says Kerry Hannon, a work and jobs expert and author of “Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life.”.
“The biggest stumbling block people have when they’re shifting careers or starting their own business is money,” she says.
If you’re opening your own business you may not be able to take a salary at first as you reinvest in the business.
“It’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon.” Create a budget for your new business just like you would for your household spending.
Lowe couldn’t have pulled off the capital-intensive launch without enough savings: he contributed the majority of the roughly $1.5 million the partners needed to start the business.
Paul Dillon, 74, also retired from his corporate job to open up his own shop, Dillon Consulting Services, LLC., where he advises veterans and others on business strategies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Single Reason Why People Can’t Write, According to a Harvard Psychologist”

These are questions Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker asks in his book, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century.
First, what is the writer trying to say, exactly? And second, how can the writer convey her ideas more clearly, without having to lean on language that confuses the reader?
For Pinker, the root cause of so much bad writing is what he calls “The Curse of Knowledge”, which he defines as “a difficulty in imagining what it is like for someone else not to know something that you know. The curse of knowledge is the single best explanation I know of why good people write bad prose.”
What starts out as a means of facilitating verbal communication between people becomes the primary mode with which people communicate their ideas in writing, from email to chat apps to business proposals and presentations.
“A considerate writer will…cultivate the habit of adding a few words of explanation to common technical terms, as in ‘Arabidopsis, a flowering mustard plant,’ rather than the bare ‘Arabidopsis.’ It’s not just an act of magnanimity: A writer who explains technical terms can multiply her readership a thousandfold at the cost of a handful of characters, the literary equivalent of picking up hundred-dollar bills on the sidewalk.”
Whenever I write a sentence that makes me pause and wonder about what it means, I assume that other readers might react in the same way.
Before hitting publish and sending your writing out to the world, it’s better to be honest with yourself about how much your reader is likely to understand a given passage or sentence.
Before you commit your writing to print- or to the internet- take a few moments to make sure that what you write is clear and understandable by as many of your intended readers as possible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “26 Favorite Books of High Achievers”

Creativity, Inc. by Ed Catmull “It may not be the newest shiny object on the shelf, but it certainly remains one of the best books for teams I have ever read. You don’t have to have a creative-based business in order to appreciate the fact that Catmull just knows how to work better with people, and how to make those people thrive. It’s an inspiration to me to see the meticulous detail and passion by which he continuously achieved this, even through failure, and how humble he was in the process. It’s a must-read for every entrepreneur and leader of people and at every level of business from startup to Fortune 500.”.
Surge: Supercharge Your Life, Business, and Legacy by Richard Lorenzen “This book aims to help readers understand the habits and mindsets used to take the company that I started at 15 years old and turn it into one of New York’s fastest-growing public relations firms. Speaking at schools and community centers across America, I was inspired to write this book when I saw an underserved need for a guide that would show aspiring and current entrepreneurs how to leverage their personal habits and goals to make themselves into the type of person a successful entrepreneur is.”
The Professional Marketer by Tim Matthews “For me, this is the one book every marketing professional in today’s SaaS world needs to read. The insights are from a true practitioner, and are far more relevant and valuable than most marketing classes at top-tier B-schools. The book enables readers to elevate messages and reach the right audience through Matthews’s experience and success. This is priceless.”
The One-Minute Manager Meets the Monkey by Ken Blanchard, William Oncken Jr., and Hal Burrows “I love this book, because the storytelling conjures such vivid imagery of what Blanchard is trying to communicate. The lessons of delegation, communication, and fighting the urge to be an internal firefighter are timeless and are as applicable to an entry-level employee as they are to the C-suite. I recommend this book to all young employees looking for something to help them get it.”
The Code Book: The Science of Secrecy From Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography by Simon Singh “This fascinating book takes the reader through the history of secrets from the runes of ancient civilizations to the future of quantum-based encryption.
7 Strategies for Wealth and Happiness by Jim Rohn “After reading hundreds of personal development and business books, this one is my all-time favorite.
How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon “This book provides an eye-opening perspective on the intersection of business and life from a strategy point of view.
His book explains not only the necessity for the change but also the art of doing it right: entering the right way, figuring out how to take charge, and helping founders step aside gracefully.

The orginal article.