Summary of “Are the super-rich ruining Burning Man?”

For many, Burning Man conjures up images of dust-covered attendees, known as “Burners”, dancing in the desert cut off from society.
Some see these camps as fundamentally opposed to the basic tenets of Burning Man.
Burning Man CEO Marian Goodell has taken the unprecedented step of withdrawing invitations to one turnkey camp – “Humano the Tribe” – and warning dozens of others.
In a blog post, Ms Goodell wrote that she was “Stunned” by the growing “Commodification and exploitation of Black Rock City and Burning Man culture”.
“Part of what makes Burning Man unique and powerful is that everyone has to work hard to be there.”
Greg Reynoso, 29, has been attending Burning Man for almost a decade.
Reflecting on the statement made by Burning Man CEO Marian Goodell, Greg describes his response as “Measured positivity”.
Greg says an important part of Burning Man is the level of preparation it takes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Betsy DeVos’ bet on boot camps”

As boot camps proliferate, policymakers in Washington have been asking whether the federal government should get behind the idea-specifically, by opening up some of the $130 billion it doles out annually in student loan guarantees and Pell Grants for higher education.
The Trump administration, led by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, wants to expand alternatives to traditional higher education and loosen some federal restrictions to make it easier for accredited colleges and universities to partner with boot camp operators.
Diane Auer Jones, a top DeVos aide leading the regulatory overhaul, said that the administration is focused on boosting university partnerships with employers; boot camps might be part of that, though the overall ambition is much larger.
Still, the proposal represents a significant expansion of the Obama experiment, which required coding boot camps to partner with traditional, accredited colleges and have a third-party organization monitor and track student outcomes as a condition of waiving the 50 percent outsourcing rule.
Without federal backing, students have to pay for the boot camps out of pocket, through private loans or tap another financing option.
Two coding boot camps acquired by large for-profit education companies to much fanfare closed in 2017, both citing challenges in developing sustainable business models.
Ryan Burke worked on coding boot camps as White House economic policy adviser for President Barack Obama – and then went to a Flatiron coding boot camp herself as a student after leaving the administration.
Now a manager at Schmidt Futures, a philanthropic venture of former Google executive Eric Schmidt, she’s a fan of boot camps but agrees that any federal support for the programs should be linked to their performance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Have a Baby? Embrace Glamping”

Camping used to be simple for my husband and me: load up the gear in a backpack and hit the trail.
When you have everything you need to make camping comfortable for your kid, it’s easier to go more often.
A few weeks ago, I camped with a bunch of friends just 40 minutes from my house.
Some people think that just because you’re camping, you need to have a remote, solo experience.
Two-burner stoves normally feel excessive and clunky, but when you can crank out food in ten minutes after a long day or running around in the woods, you’ll be grateful.
He’ll bring two large metal buckets with handles that we can fill at any water spigot and carry back to camp for cleaning up.
My husband used to laugh at my insistence on bringing toys camping.
If at daycare your kiddo goes to the playground at 10 a.m., then naps at 1 p.m., make that your camp schedule, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The comeback of cursive: A new generation finds the tactile joys of an old-school art”

Francesca Curatilo attended three camps this summer: wilderness, martial arts and – in the final days before the start of school – cursive.
In the classroom pantheon of Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, cursive was the writing.
In the early 20th century, cursive was sometimes taught for an hour each day, and all the way through high school, as an almost military exercise.
Because cursive required a level of fine-motor skills not typically accessible before third grade, printing was embraced as a way to get younger children to express themselves through writing.
Campers seemed to luxuriate in the tactile activities, the way cursive allowed them to rarely raise their pens from paper, an entire word recorded in a few swooping strokes.
Johnson isn’t required to teach cursive during the school year but sometimes adds it to the curriculum after she’s met the state testing requirements.
“Society has gotten nervous about deviating from what is the norm,” she said, and cursive “Tends to make a comeback when conformity is threatened.”
“Where is cursive really, really big? Christian home schooling and places like Louisiana.” But also the New York City schools, which last year encouraged, but didn’t mandate, teaching script.

The orginal article.

Summary of “China’s Mass Internment Camps Have No Clear End in Sight – Foreign Policy”

Hundreds of thousands of minority men and women, mostly Uighurs but also others, have disappeared into these compounds in the last year, usually with no notice to family members and no charges of illegal activity.
It is not surprising that the most common officially cited purpose for the internment camps is to purify people’s thoughts, “Eliminating extremism” and instilling a love for the party.
A recorded announcement leaked this month from Xinjiang’s Communist Party Youth League, designed to calm rampant fears about the re-education camps, explained that camps “Treat and cleanse the virus from their brains.” The names used for camps have varied widely, both for the same camp over time and from one camp to the next, but most have included the word “Transformation”-for example, “Concentrated education transformation center.”
The handful of people released from the camps and able to share their stories describe a variety of indoctrination techniques aimed to instill love for the Communist Party of China and its leader, Xi Jinping.
In January, an instructor at a daytime re-education course told his students that they would be sent to the internment camps if they could not memorize both the oath of allegiance to the Communist Party and the national anthem in Chinese within three days, according to village police who spoke to Radio Free Asia.
Across the world, Uighurs with expiring passports or visas are currently weighing whether to claim asylum in foreign lands and never see their families again, or to face near-certain internment upon their return to Xinjiang.
At the upper end of the Zenz estimate, Xinjiang’s re-education camp population exceeds the peak daily inmate numbers of Nazi concentration camps, is several times the number of the Japanese citizens interned by the United States during World War II, and amounts to about half the capacity of the Soviet gulag system, which held around 2 million people.
Barring a complete abandonment of the camp system, the most moderate plausible outcome is that at some point authorities dramatically reduce the number of internees, maintaining recalcitrant inmates in the camps, and preserving the capacity to return huge numbers to extrajudicial internment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happened at Camp Lejeune”

From the 1950s through at least 1985, an undetermined number of of residents, including infants, children, and civilian workers and personnel, were exposed to trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and other contaminants in the drinking water at the Camp Lejeune.
In the book A Trust Betrayed: The Untold Story of Camp Lejeune, author Mike Magner gives special attention to my mother’s story: “A woman with the ironic name of Mary Freshwater may have had the most ghastly experiences at Camp Lejeune.”
Camp Lejeune has been characterized as a candidate for the worst water contamination case in U.S. history-and I am one of up to a million people who were poisoned.
In 2014, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, issued a position on the water at Camp Lejeune.
The ATSDR found that “Past exposures from the 1950s through February 1985 to trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and other contaminants in the drinking water at the Camp Lejeune likely increased the risk of cancers.”
“If the Marines are worried about their liabilities for the water contamination at Camp Lejeune, they ain’t seen nothin’ yet.”
In 2007, the National Academy of Sciences convened a panel to talk about the water at Lejeune.
My mother was sitting in the audience while experts went on about statistics until it was time to hear from the people affected by the poisoned water at Camp Lejeune.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Songwriting Camps Where Pop’s Biggest Hits Get Crafted”

Songwriting camps have convened since the early ’90s, when Police manager and I.R.S. Records chief Miles Copeland invited heavy hitters such as Cher and Squeeze’s Glenn Tilbrook to his French château.
For Rihanna’s 2009 album Rated R, Def Jam Records chief Antonio “L.A.” Reid hosted what John Seabrook, in his book The Song Machine, called “The mother of all song camps.” Camps have multiplied since then: In June, Alicia Keys held an all-female retreat, called She Is the Music, at Jungle City Studios overlooking the Manhattan skyline; publishing giant Warner/Chappell Music invited 45 writers to Las Vegas; and independent label and publishing company Concord Music Group held one with 87 songwriters in Nashville to create music for movies, ads, trailers, promos, and TV shows.
“If you’ve got a huge song coming out of the camp, it’s definitely paid for the camp and probably beyond that,” says Kara DioGuardi, who has written hits for Pink, Kelly Clarkson, Britney Spears, and others and recently purchased a Nashville building to hold camps and other music-business events.
The camps, or at least the collaborative songwriting process, have fundamentally changed the way pop music sounds – Beyoncé’s Lemonade was a strikingly personal album, full of scorned-lover songs, but it was conceived by teams of writers.
Madonna, who tends to collaborate with one or two producers at a time, recently complained on Instagram that she wanted to be “Allowed to be a visionary and not have to go to song writing camps where No one can sit still for more than 15 minutes”; Oasis’s Noel Gallagher piled on Ed Sheeran and “The little fella from One Direction” for collaborating with numerous songwriters at a time.
Madonna and Gallagher are missing the central point of the camps – they’re not corporate factory farms where major labels crunch songwriting parts together and come out with chicken nuggets; they’re just another way to find that elusive spark, just as combos of jazzmen do onstage, or John Lennon and Paul McCartney once did when they stumbled onto the B7 chord in “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” DioGuardi compares them to the Brill Building, which housed songwriters like Carole King and Neil Diamond in the ’50s and ’60s. And Longstreth says, “When people look at things like that – ‘Oh my gosh, there’s 17 writers, what is music?’ – it’s a little bit misleading.”
Ress told me afterward she had a love-hate relationship with songwriting camps because she felt like she was sometimes writing for new artists who didn’t have a musical identity and relied on songwriters to establish it for them.
Pop songwriting has been moving in a more collaborative direction for years, leading behind-the-scenes creators to scramble for credits – production duo Cool & Dre told Billboard that collaborating on an instrumental loop on the Carters’ Everything Is Love was “Life-changing.” Drake’s “Nice for What” and Cardi B’s “Be Careful” list 16 and 17 writers, respectively.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Incarcerated Women Who Fight California’s Wildfires”

During World War II, California turned its prisons into factories for the military industry and moved inmates into the temporary forestry camps of the Civilian Conservation Corps, a public work-relief program created during the Depression.
In 1946, as part of Gov. Earl Warren’s Prisoner Rehabilitation Act, the state opened Camp Rainbow which – under the joint supervision of the state’s Division of Forestry and the California Department of Corrections – housed inmates to clear fire lines.
”Any fire you go on statewide, whether it be small or large, the inmate hand crews make up anywhere from 50 to 80 percent of the total fire personnel,” says Lt. Keith Radey, the commander who is in charge of a camp where women train.
At Malibu 13, one of three conservation camps that house women, the commander, John Scott, showed me a printout: Inmate firefighters can make a maximum of $2.56 a day in camp and $1 an hour when they’re fighting fires.
After visiting three camps over a year and a half, I could see why inmates would accept the risks.
They’re being trained to work in a field they will probably have trouble finding a job in when they get out: Los Angeles County Fire won’t hire felons and C.D.C.R. doesn’t offer any formal help to inmates who want firefighting jobs when they’re released.
The Conservation Camp Program saves California taxpayers approximately $100 million a year, according to C.D.C.R. Several states, including Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and Georgia employ prisoners to fight fires, but none of them rely as heavily on its inmate population as California does.
Faced with the prospect of a state in flames, California continues to depend on its inmate firefighters as a tenuous and all-but-invisible line of defense.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Coding Boot Camps Close, the Field Faces a Reality Check”

Only three years ago, Kaplan, the biggest supplier of test-preparation courses, bought Dev Bootcamp and pledged bold expansion.
Since 2013, the number of boot camp schools in the United States has tripled to more than 90, and the number of graduates will reach nearly 23,000 in 2017, a tenfold jump from 2013, according to Course Report, which tracks the industry.
Boot camp courses, aimed at adults, vary in length and cost.
The average course length is just over 14 weeks, and the average cost is $11,400, according to Course Report.
The successful schools, analysts say, will increasingly be ones that expand their programs to suit the changing needs of employers.
Some have already added courses like data science, artificial intelligence, digital marketing and project management.
Other steps include tailoring courses for corporations, which need to update the skills of their workers, or develop online courses.
Ryan Craig, a managing director at University Ventures, which invests in education start-ups, including Galvanize, a large boot camp, predicted that the overall market would still grow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jeannie Rousseau de Clarens, Valiant World War II Spy, Dies at 98”

Her father, Jean, a veteran of World War I, was a senior official with the foreign ministry and, after retiring, the mayor of the 17th Arrondissement in Paris, on the Right Bank.
Adept at languages, Ms. Rousseau performed brilliantly at the elite Sciences Po, graduating at the top of her class in 1939.
After getting out of the car and walking toward the meeting place, Ms. Rousseau was arrested.
Determined to take a stand, she approached the camp commander and announced, in German, that she and her fellow Frenchwomen were prisoners of war and that under the Geneva Convention they could not be made to manufacture weapons.
She was sent back to Ravensbrück, where befuddled officials, after failing to determine who exactly Jeannie Rousseau was, sent her to a punishment camp in Königsberg, which she described tersely as “a very bad place.”
Ms. Rousseau was close to death when the Swedish Red Cross came to the camp in 1945, in the waning weeks of the war, with a list of prisoners, Ms. Rousseau among them, whose release they had negotiated.
“After the war, the curtain came down on my memories,” she told The Post.
In 1993, the director of central intelligence, R. James Woolsey, presented her with the Seal Medallion “For heroic and momentous contribution to Allied efforts during World War II as a member of the French Resistance.”

The orginal article.