Summary of “Smokey Bear is still keeping his watchful eye on America’s forests after 75 years on the job”

Some 96% of Americans recognized this constant reminder to keep forests safe, according to a survey in 2013, making him about as familiar as Mickey Mouse and Santa Claus.
After briefly featuring Bambi, the deer from the popular Walt Disney 1942 film, the Forest Service landed on a black bear.
In 1944, Staehle created a tender-looking bear pouring a bucket of water over a campfire for the Forest Service.
Three years later, came the well-known slogan that told Americans “Only you can prevent forest fires.”
In the forests of Northern New Mexico, local people see Smokey’s fire prevention message as a threat because they burn off small parts of the forest to plant crops or graze animals.
Kosek said the fire-suppression campaign reflects a belief, deeply rooted in the Forest Service’s history, that people who set fires in forests are deviants and evildoers.
Contrary to Smokey’s message, fires can be good for forests.
The Forest Service itself said this phenomenon has made forests less healthy and increased the intensity of wildfires in some areas in its 2007 report, “Be Careful What You Wish For: The Legacy of Smokey Bear.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Schitt’s Creek and the Making of an Emmy Underdog Success”

As Tuesday’s nominations underscored with the shocking success of Pop TV’s Schitt’s Creek and BBC America’s Killing Eve, the big guys haven’t locked up a monopoly on Emmy gold just yet.
In a sign there’s a limit to how much Emmy love money can buy, those two underdog shows from smaller networks ended up scoring multiple nominations in major categories, while high-profile projects from Julia Roberts, Emma Stone, and George Clooney were virtually ignored by voters.
While the network’s PR team certainly worked overtime to raise the show’s profile, “The idea of us putting together huge Emmy campaigns and spending a lot of money to go get Emmys was never something we would ever do. [So] when the Emmy chatter started happening it happened organically,” he said.
While grassroots support might not have meant much to Emmy voters ten or 15 years ago – or else Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Veronica Mars would’ve taken home a slew of statuettes – in the age of social media and dozens of entertainment-news websites, bottom-up Emmy campaigns today actually have a chance of working.
Even if Emmy voters never saw Orphan Black trend on Twitter, they likely read the countless stories about the Clone Club or the rave reviews, creating a feedback loop that ultimately helped Maslany score three Emmy noms and one win.
“Dan [Levy] had an Ellen appearance strategically placed during Emmy season. We flew the cast out to do Deadline’s The Contenders series. Some of the cast were on the MTV Movie and TV Awards As a smaller network, we can’t compete with huge billboards asking for Emmys. We’ve just done what we can to remind everyone of the great show that everyone loves and to just throw some fuel on the fire that already exists.”
“The goal is really to break through that clutter.” It may have worked: After being ignored by voters for the first two years of Noah’s run, The Daily Show – an Emmy darling during Jon Stewart’s tenure as anchor – was finally nominated for Best Variety/Talk Show in 2018, and again this week.
“These types of campaigns get additional exposure for those shows, so the Emmy window is a piece of the year-round promotional plan. Every opportunity we can to spotlight the show and raise awareness for it, the better.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hidden Cost of GoFundMe Health Care”

On June 12, 2016, after a gunman opened fire at the Pulse night club, in Orlando, a GoFundMe campaign was started for victims and their families.
Leone is in contact with another GoFundMe campaign for two young Canavan siblings, Benny and Josh, in Brooklyn.
Through two GoFundMe campaigns, she had fraudulently raised thirty-eight thousand dollars; altogether, she had taken in nearly half a million dollars, most of it through a seven-year false narrative perpetrated on her family and friends.
Gonzalez writes for the accounting-industry news site Going Concern and started GoFraudMe in 2015, after noticing a GoFundMe campaign soliciting funds for Bart the Zombie Cat, who purportedly got hit by a car, dug himself out of his grave, and rang up a sizable unpaid medical bill at the Humane Society of Tampa Bay.
Around the same time, GoFundMe blocked campaigns for the Hallwang cancer clinic, in Germany, which offers dubious “Ozone therapy.” “We shouldn’t be a regulator, and we’re not equipped to be one,” Solomon told me.
“But a clinic that is creating false hope and charging exorbitant amounts?” GoFundMe banned anti-vaccination campaigns this year on the ground that they were threatening public health.
“When you’re sick and out of work, very often you have no income, and GoFundMe is a viable solution.” He blamed the trend toward medical crowdfunding in the United States on income inequality, and cast GoFundMe as a stopgap measure.
‘ ” The idea was for GoFundMe to advocate on behalf of high-profile campaigns.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Beto O’Rourke Stays on the Road”

It’s not easy to get Beto O’Rourke to speak disparagingly about anyone.
Born Robert Francis O’Rourke, Beto got his nickname as an infant-it’s the local shorthand for Roberto, Alberto, Humberto.
O’Rourke took a solo road trip to think things over.
One began to hear more about not just white privilege but also the singular privilege of being Beto O’Rourke.
A parody Twitter account called Not Beto’s Journal skewered the tone of his road blog: “This is a campaign for America. For everyone in America. For everything in America. This is a campaign that stands for everything. For anything. For all the things. For America.” When O’Rourke passed through New York: “Grabbed a cab near Times Square. The whole world right in one place. Sudhir, my driver, asks me where we’re going. I reply ‘you tell me, my friend.'”.
Veronica Escobar, the new congresswoman for the area, and an old pal of O’Rourke’s, gave him a rousing introduction, calling him “a son of the border.” O’Rourke and his family took the makeshift stage with one of his favorite songs-the Clash’s “Clampdown”-blasting over concert-calibre speakers.
O’Rourke has basically tried to re-create his Senate campaign.
O’Rourke, describing his experience both in Congress and on the campaign trail, said, “You’re always aware of how much you do not know, and how many things you want to get smart on.” This statement-the mix of humility and ambition-struck me as pure O’Rourke.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Robert Mueller Can Do No More”

“The Russian government interfered in the 2016 presidential election in sweeping and systematic fashion,” Mueller wrote.
The Trump campaign “Expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts,” and it “Welcomed” this help.
There is insufficient evidence to accuse the Trump campaign of criminal conspiracy with its Russian benefactors.
“The social media campaign and the GRU hacking operations coincided with a series of contacts between Trump Campaign officials and individuals with ties to the Russian government.”
The special counsel in some cases “Was not able to corroborate witness statements through comparison to contemporaneous communications or fully question witnesses about statements that appeared inconsistent with other known facts.” In particular, the investigation never did determine what happened to proprietary Trump-campaign polling data shared with the Russians.
Within hours of the appointment of a special counsel to investigate 2016 events, Trump began defaming him.
Trump had already fired the FBI director who investigated these events.
His first order to fire the special counsel appointed in the director’s place was issued on June 17, 2017, a month after Mueller’s appointment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The ‘3.5% rule’: How a small minority can change the world”

Looking at hundreds of campaigns over the last century, Chenoweth found that nonviolent campaigns are twice as likely to achieve their goals as violent campaigns.
As a PhD student at the University of Colorado, she had spent years studying the factors contributing to the rise of terrorism when she was asked to attend an academic workshop organised by the International Center of Nonviolent Conflict, a non-profit organisation based in Washington DC. The workshop presented many compelling examples of peaceful protests bringing about lasting political change – including the People Power protests in the Philippines.
Overall, nonviolent campaigns were twice as likely to succeed as violent campaigns: they led to political change 53% of the time compared to 26% for the violent protests.
Overall, the nonviolent campaigns attracted around four times as many participants as the average violent campaign.
While many forms of nonviolent protests also carry serious risks – just think of China’s response in Tiananmen Square in 1989 – Chenoweth argues that nonviolent campaigns are generally easier to discuss openly, which means that news of their occurrence can reach a wider audience.
“And the techniques of nonviolent resistance are often more visible, so that it’s easier for people to find out how to participate directly, and how to coordinate their activities for maximum disruption.”
Some relatively large nonviolent protests also failed, such as the protests against the communist party in East Germany in the 1950s, which attracted 400,000 members at their peak, but still failed to bring about change.
The fact remains that nonviolent campaigns are the only reliable way of maintaining that kind of engagement.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Andrew Yang, Democratic presidential candidate, draws crowds, money and an expected spot on the debate stage”

STUART, Iowa – Andrew Yang knows that most Americans have absolutely no idea who he is.
Yang has become something of a below-the-radar phenomenon in the crowded field of candidates vying for the Democratic presidential nomination.
Some candidates far better known than he is have been struggling to catch fire on social media and are playing to smaller audiences; Yang has been packing in some of the largest crowds in the race – an estimated 3,000 in San Francisco; 2,000 in Los Angeles; and 2,500 in Seattle, where he paused the rally to point out a pair of bald eagles soaring overhead. “It’s a sign!” Yang declared, as supporters broke into a chant of “USA! USA! USA!”.
While Democratic voters are so far largely embracing conventional politicians, the ability of an outsider like Yang to generate buzz shows how the unsettled political climate that paved the way for Donald Trump’s stunning 2016 rise is reverberating in the 2020 contest.
Some of the more prominent Democratic candidates have tried to answer voter unease over the economy and the state of the country by staking out positions far more liberal than those held by the party four years ago – but Yang is selling himself as a total disrupter.
To prove his point, Yang decided to use his own money to give $1,000 a month to two people for a year – someone in New Hampshire, the other in Iowa, the first voting states.
White nationalist Richard Spencer has tweeted approvingly of Yang, describing him as “The most grounded presidential candidate of my lifetime.”
“I’ve done the math, and I’ll have approximately 12 minutes of airtime. . . 10 to 12 minutes to introduce myself to the American people,” Yang said, probably exaggerating the time any candidate onstage is likely to have.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mueller Report Says Trump Committed Crimes”

Trump has since insisted that he was joking in that speech.
“Trump asked individuals affiliated with his Campaign to find the deleted Clinton emails,” the report states.
“Michael Flynn recalled that Trump made this request repeatedly, and Flynn subsequently contacted multiple people in an effort to obtain the emails.”
Ledeen had been working on recovering the emails for a while already, Mueller reports.
Smith, for his part, “Drafted multiple emails stating or intimating that he was in contact with Russian hackers”-though Mueller notes that the investigation “Did not establish that Smith was in contact with Russian hackers or that Smith, Ledeen, or other individuals in touch with the Trump Campaign ultimately obtained the deleted Clinton emails.”
In other words, even as a real hacking operation was going on, Trump personally, his campaign, and his campaign followers were actively attempting to collude with a fake hacking operation over fake emails.
Then there are the more-than-100 pages detailing Russian contacts and links with the Trump campaign and business.
Mueller concludes, after detailing the contacts, that “The investigation established multiple links between Trump Campaign officials and individuals tied to the Russian government. Those links included Russian offers of assistance to the Campaign. In some instances, the Campaign was receptive to the offer, while in other instances the Campaign officials shied away. Ultimately, the investigation did not establish that the Campaign coordinated or conspired with the Russian government in its election-interference activities.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What you missed in the Mueller report”

Dozens of overlooked nuggets are buried deep inside the special counsel’s 448-page report that raise yet more intriguing questions about Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election and shed new light on charges Mueller considered and dropped, who dished the most on the president, who evaded Mueller’s attempts to secure an interview, what happened to the FBI’s mysterious counterintelligence investigation and why a Russian Olympic weightlifter ended up on the special counsel’s radar.
Donald Trump Jr. is quoted extensively in the Mueller report – from his Twitter feed to his text messages and interviews with the Senate Judiciary Committee and Sean Hannity.
Mueller’s report doesn’t supply any fresh Trump Jr. quotes.
The Mueller report revealed that Rosenstein delivered an even more detailed version of the memo in October 2017 that cleared the way for investigations into Stone, Cohen, former Trump campaign deputy Rick Gates and two other individuals whose names were redacted for “Personal privacy.”
After 22 months, Mueller’s team conceded in its report it still can’t “Fully” answer what Page was doing in Moscow in July 2016, a few months after he joined the Trump campaign.
Cohen told Mueller that he let it go because he was already working on the Trump Tower Moscow project with Felix Sater, a Russia-born developer who claimed to have Kremlin connections of his own.
Joseph Mifsud, described by Mueller as “a Maltese national who worked as a professor at the London Academy of Diplomacy in London,” was the first to tell the Trump campaign that Russia had “Dirt” on Clinton in the form of thousands of emails.
Mueller outlines in the report, for the first time, the “Various Russian contacts” Mifsud maintained while living in London – which included a “One-time employee” of the Internet Research Agency, the company employing the Russia online trolls that Mueller charged in connection with the Kremlin’s disinformation campaign.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Mueller Found on Russia and on Obstruction: A First Analysis”

Throughout his time with the Trump campaign-Manafort resigned in August 2016 but continued to advise the Trump campaign through at least November-Manafort maintained consistent contact with his “Longtime” associate Konstantin Kilimnik, a Ukrainian who, according to the report, “The FBI assesses to have ties to Russian intelligence.” Kilimnik attempted to have Manafort pass along a peace plan for Ukraine that Manafort acknowledged to be friendly to Russian interests, though the Mueller team was unable to identify evidence that Manafort did so.
According to the Mueller report, after candidate Trump stated in July 2016 that he hoped Russia would “Find the 30,000 emails,” future National Security Adviser Michael Flynn reached out to multiple people to try and obtain those emails.
While the investigation found that Smith communicated with both Flynn and Clovis, it found no evidence that any of the four individuals listed “Initiated or directed Smith’s efforts.” So essentially, a bunch of people in Trump’s orbit tried very hard to obtain stolen emails but came up empty.
The meeting was proposed to Donald Trump Jr. in an email from Robert Goldstone, who said that the “Crown prosecutor of Russia … offered to provide the Trump Campaign with some official documents and information that would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia” as “Part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump.” Trump Jr. responded that “If it’s what you say I love it” and arranged the meeting through a series of emails and telephone calls.
The report indicates that Mueller could not establish that Donald Trump knew in advance about the meeting, and Trump’s submitted written answers say he has no recollection of learning of the meeting at the time.
All this leads to Mueller’s key conclusion, quoted only in part in Barr’s initial letter: “If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state. Accordingly, while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” This reasoning makes clear the disconnect between Mueller’s approach to the obstruction investigation and that of Barr, who independently chose to evaluate the evidence against Trump and determine that it was not sufficient to establish an obstruction offense.
Later, in response to a question, Barr emphasized that Mueller had avoided reaching a conclusion as to whether or not Trump had committed an obstruction crime on the basis of OLC’s view that a sitting president was not subject to indictment.
Nadler’s reaction to the redacted report’s content were unequivocal: “Even in its incomplete form, the Mueller report outlines disturbing evidence that President Trump engaged in obstruction of justice and other misconduct.” In noting Mueller’s decision not to exonerate the president, he added, “The responsibility now falls to Congress to hold the President accountable for his actions.” He said impeachment was “One possibility” but that it was “Too early” to make that decision.

The orginal article.