Summary of “Tracking Down the $7.6 Million Teardrop Talbot-Lago”

Joe lives in a development a few miles west of the $15 million mansions lining the sea, on the workaday side of the Intracoastal Waterway.
Joe worked with his heirs to gain part ownership and traveled the U. S., interviewing past owners and authorities and tracking the car’s provenance.
Calling Joe a “South Florida hustler and con man,” they said they had only received $150,000 apiece from the sale of the Ferrari, while Joe took $2.4 million.
For two years, Joe went to work crafting a history of the Teardrop.
Somehow the stolen Teardrop had ended up in the hands of Joe’s friend turned enemy, who had sold it for more than $7 million to the novice collector.
Motor-­vehicle authorities contacted the Milwaukee police, who called Mueller-its rightful owner-and the FBI. Mueller, who was then working with Joe to find the car, demanded the return of the Teardrop.
After his arrest, he became cooperative, giving them the motor as well as his computers and files, which contained information tying him to what Joe believes is a $60 million network of international car thieves-all run by his former friend.
“I’ve been coming here for years,” Joe says, sucking down an oyster.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NASCAR may be the fastest way to learn about physics”

Part of the force of the road pushing up on the car – what physicists call the normal force – assists the frictional force of the tires and helps the car make it around the turn.
Banking at Richmond International Raceway allows cars to go approximately 1.3 times faster than they could without banking.
A NASCAR engine produces around 750 horsepower, which exceeds a similar model street car that tops out around 300 horsepower.
The cars’ power comes from burning gas as the engine rotates.
The rotation of a NASCAR engine is 3.5 times faster than a standard street car and much more efficient, allowing it to combust more quickly and produce more power.
With the high speed and power of stock cars come the risks of dangerous collisions.
The front end of the car itself is also made to crumple, which extends the time of impact.
A 5-point harness connects the driver to the car, once again spreading the area of impact.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Bizarre as Hell’: The Disappearance of the Yuba County Five”

Five Beloved “Boys” How these five men came to be on an inhospitable mountain road more than 50 miles from their homes in and around Marysville and Yuba City, California, was just one of the mysteries surrounding their disappearance.
There was no reason to mention having seen the Mercury until newspapers began to blare out notices about the five men who had gone missing that Friday.
Around them, police saw nothing but rugged, dense forest, hardly an appealing option for the lightly dressed young men.
Why did the men turn east in the first place? Why didn’t they attempt to move the car once it got stuck, instead of walking to nowhere in the middle of the night? Was it by chance they came across the trailer, or did someone lead them there? Why not start a fire for warmth? If Mathias went for help, where was his body?
The men, panicking, may have believed their car was stuck and that they needed to get help.
None of the men thought to walk downhill, from where they came, and instead faced the treacherous and unfamiliar path ahead. Police never ruled out foul play, nor did the families.
Ted Weiher’s sister-in-law has theorized that the men may have seen something take place at the basketball game that prompted someone to chase them.
Police were never able to establish evidence for pursuit, but no one could shake the idea that the men seemed to be determined to move forward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Iacocca Is Rightly Remembered For The Mustang But The Minivan Is His Biggest Legacy”

Iacocca did not invent the minivan, any more than Ray Kroc invented McDonald’s.
Sperlich came to Chrysler with Iacocca after Ford fired him, and his minivan idea had a second chance.
The minivan is notable for another reason: It is one of the few vehicles Detroit executed that caused Japan to stumble for years trying to play catch-up, rather than the usual obverse.
Within a few years of its introduction, the minivan had become so ubiquitous it entered the popular culture.
Despite their extreme utility, list of features and increasing stylishness, it’s probably wrong to say that most minivan buyers were enamored of their minivans.
I remember one couple that had settled on a minivan, knew they needed a minivan, knew the minivan was absolutely, positively the correct choice.
Even up until the moment they signed the contract for their minivan, they were browsing pictures of SUVs on the lot, because, they said, laughing, they just couldn’t imagine thinking of themselves as minivan people.
So there’s a cruel poetry to the fact that it was the SUV that killed the minivan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Car Crashes Aren’t Always Unavoidable”

To begin with, mundane road regulations embed automobile supremacy into federal, state, and local law.
Land-use law, criminal law, torts, insurance, vehicle safety regulations, even the tax code-all these sources of law provide rewards to cooperate with what has become the dominant transport mode, and punishment for those who defy it.
Further entrenching automobile supremacy are laws that require landowners who build housing and office space to build housing for cars as well.
In large part because of parking quotas, parking lots now cover more than a third of the land area of some U.S. cities; Houston is estimated to have 30 parking spaces for every resident.
Every employee who brings a car to the office essentially doubles the amount of space he takes up at work, and in urban areas his employer may be required by law to build him a $50,000 garage parking space.
On its own terms, the mortgage-interest tax deduction is neutral as to the type of home financed, but-given the twin constraints of zoning and mortgage lending-the deduction primarily subsidizes large houses in car-centric areas.
Another provision of the tax code gives car buyers a tax rebate of up to $7,500 when their new vehicles are electric or hybrid; buyers of brand-new Audis, BMWs, and Jaguars can claim the full $7,500 from the American taxpayer.
Why are we taxing bus riders to pay rich people to buy McMansions and luxury electric SUVs?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Make Driving Dangerous Again”

Seatbelts, airbags, ABS, back-up cameras, lane-departure warning systems, automatic emergency braking… Today’s cars are way smarter than the horses that once pulled them.
See, because we’re so in love with oversized cars, the auto industry keeps churning out death machines.
Sure, autonomous cars are unlikely to take over the roads anytime soon, but they’re already perhaps the greatest excuse for doing fuck-all that the world has ever seen.
Best of all, the price of your next car will almost certainly come down dramatically.
No doubt we’d also see a tremendous decrease in the number of senior citizens driving their cars into storefronts, since with a manual transmission you’ve got to make a concerted effort to put your car into reverse.
Hot outside? Well, guess what? Now it’s hot in the car too! No more sitting in an idling car for 45 minutes on a 90-degree day, futzing with your phone while you pump more carbon emissions into the atmosphere.
If all goes well, by 2030, we’ll all be driving 1960s roadsters with better reliability-and due to the lack of safety features, drivers will instead be pressured to wear motoring helmets.
In the end, driving will finally be the exclusive domain of a handful of enthusiasts, and tomorrow’s motorist will be no different than those people you see riding around on Can-Am Spyders today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “People in Japan are renting cars but not driving them”

Japanese car-sharing service Orix discovered this recently after finding out that many of its customers were renting its cars but not driving them.
In the aftermath of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, rental cars were also used to recharge cellphones.
“Usually the only place I can take a nap while visiting my clients is a cybercafe in front of the station, but renting a car to sleep in is just a few hundred yen, almost the same as staying in the cybercafe.”
Japanese car rental companies couldn’t figure out why their cars were be rented, but not driven.
James Riney July 4, 2019 Car-sharing is widely popular in Japan, despite still gathering momentum in the US. The cars are accessible and easy to locate.
The question is: how will the car-sharing companies react? Will they market their cars as a cheap and easy way to catch some shut-eye? It’s unlikely since most companies make money based on how far their cars are driven.
So do they charge an extra fee for renting the car but not driving it as a way to deter this trend?
Most cars spend something like 90 percent of their existence just sitting around, parked, waiting to be driven.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Definitive Rules of the Road for Urban Cyclists”

“You want to adhere to the same rules and laws as when you are driving your car.” It doesn’t just mean obeying the standard rules of yielding, signaling, turning, crossing, and following all other traffic laws-it means thinking of the bike as an actual vehicle that you maneuver through the roads.
This shifts your body weight back on the bike and keeps the rear wheel in contact with the road to give greater stopping power.
Doug also lists the many dangers that lurk in our beloved bike lanes-debris, broken glass, sticks, sand, gravel, dead animals-many of which lie on the far right-hand side of the road gutter, leaving cyclists to swerve around or ride over these obstacles.
Prepare for the Unexpected; the Bike Lane Cannot Save You Too often “Life in the bike lane” means “Smack dab in the door zone.”
“Make sure the arrow passes you on the right, putting you in the left third of a painted bike lane.” That space gives more time to react to jaywalking pedestrians or delivery trucks and ride-hailing cars that frequently stop in city bike lanes.
Whichever way the bike swoops, keep the inside pedal up while leaning to avoid contact with the road. “If you’re turning right really sharply, think about having the inside pedal at the top of your pedal stroke in the 12 o’clock position if you’re looking at your crank as the face of a clock,” Doug says.
A rare exception to the one-way rules: sometimes contraflow lanes allow cyclists to go opposite directions on a one-way street, or cycle tracks create two bike lanes on a one-way road. Doug warns these pieces of infrastructure should be approached with considerable caution.
The classic city bike has the advantage of giving riders an upright position to see the road more easily.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How will Formula One reckon with electric cars?”

“Everyone remembers how great the cars used to sound.” Another V-8 screams down the track, its wail piercing our air-conditioned sanctum, and he fights a smile.
As the consumer world trends toward electric ­vehicles, Formula One shows no sign of putting the brakes on its gas-burning engines.
In parallel, to maintain the interest of eco-conscious race fans, the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile, which governs most of professional racing, recently bankrolled a new electric racing series called Formula E. You’d think an all-amps competition would be the most sophisticated racing around, but Formula E is not as technologically cutthroat as F1. To attract smaller outfits, the FIA made entering Formula E, which is only three years old, relatively unintimidating: Many major parts are standard, so you don’t need the kind of R&D operation required to develop, for example, a battery from scratch.
In both Formula One and Formula E, the FIA has a lot of say in how racing squads spend their money.
“The show has to be the number-one priority,” Brawn says, and then starts slapping the table to punctuate the list of factors that, to him, define Formula One: “The racing [slap], the drivers [slap], the history [slap], the noise [slap], the smell [slap], the atmosphere [slap].”
Everybody jumps on the hype of electric cars because Tesla is doing it, but no auto manufacturer who is ­going pure electric has ever earned one dollar of profit,” says Wolff, his ­German-accented English just ein bisschen louder than normal.
Yup-2019, which is when Mercedes plans to join Formula E. Porsche recently announced plans to race that year too.
One solution would seem glaringly obvious: Formula One could go electric.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How will Formula One reckon with electric cars?”

“Everyone remembers how great the cars used to sound.” Another V-8 screams down the track, its wail piercing our air-conditioned sanctum, and he fights a smile.
As the consumer world trends toward electric ­vehicles, Formula One shows no sign of putting the brakes on its gas-burning engines.
In parallel, to maintain the interest of eco-conscious race fans, the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile, which governs most of professional racing, recently bankrolled a new electric racing series called Formula E. You’d think an all-amps competition would be the most sophisticated racing around, but Formula E is not as technologically cutthroat as F1. To attract smaller outfits, the FIA made entering Formula E, which is only three years old, relatively unintimidating: Many major parts are standard, so you don’t need the kind of R&D operation required to develop, for example, a battery from scratch.
In both Formula One and Formula E, the FIA has a lot of say in how racing squads spend their money.
“The show has to be the number-one priority,” Brawn says, and then starts slapping the table to punctuate the list of factors that, to him, define Formula One: “The racing [slap], the drivers [slap], the history [slap], the noise [slap], the smell [slap], the atmosphere [slap].”
Everybody jumps on the hype of electric cars because Tesla is doing it, but no auto manufacturer who is ­going pure electric has ever earned one dollar of profit,” says Wolff, his ­German-accented English just ein bisschen louder than normal.
Yup-2019, which is when Mercedes plans to join Formula E. Porsche recently announced plans to race that year too.
One solution would seem glaringly obvious: Formula One could go electric.

The orginal article.