Summary of “‘Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee’ Season 10 Netflix Review”

The tenth season of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which starts streaming Friday, marks the first fresh batch of episodes since host Jerry Seinfeld moved the chat show from Crackle to Netflix.
It’s tempting to call Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee Jerry Seinfeld’s second show about nothing, since sometimes that description rings true.
He’s guided completely by his own curiosity and instincts, which is what makes Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee so interesting, particularly if you’re a Seinfeld fan, but also maddening at the same time.
Perhaps that’s why this first Netflix season of Comedians in Cars demonstrates, purely by accident, why Seinfeld’s humor felt so right in the 1990s and feels less in sync with the current moment.
It’s harder this season – either because of Seinfeld himself, the times in which we are living, or some combination of the two – to overlook how out of touch the whole exercise, including Seinfeld, sometimes seems.
No one would ever accuse Seinfeld of being woke, but there are times in Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee when he seems to be the anti-woke.
Of course, Seinfeld would have no patience for this type of critique, and he says as much at various points during Comedians in Cars.
It’s a generous, ego-free act on Seinfeld’s part that a lot of other comedians would never allow on their own show.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Self-driving cars are headed toward an AI roadblock”

Waymo is already testing cars on limited-but-public roads in Arizona.
That leaves Tesla and other autonomy companies with a scary question: Will self-driving cars keep getting better, like image search, voice recognition, and the other AI success stories? Or will they run into the generalization problem like chat bots? Is autonomy an interpolation problem or a generalization problem? How unpredictable is driving, really?
“Driverless cars are like a scientific experiment where we don’t know the answer,” Marcus says.
Nearly every car accident involves some sort of unforeseen circumstance, and without the power to generalize, self-driving cars will have to confront each of these scenarios as if for the first time.
AI founder Andrew Ng, a former Baidu executive and one of the industry’s most prominent boosters, argues the problem is less about building a perfect driving system than training bystanders to anticipate self-driving behavior.
Ann Miura-Ko, a venture capitalist who sits on the board of Lyft, says she thinks part of the problem is high expectations for autonomous cars themselves, classifying anything less than full autonomy as a failure.
Still, it’s not clear how long self-driving cars can stay in their current limbo.
With deep learning sitting at the heart of how cars perceive objects and decide to respond, improving the accident rate may be harder than it looks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Guide to Little Vehicles, the Future of Urban Mobility”

Little Vehicles could significantly erode private car and ride-hail use, and play a key role in helping cities achieve their as of now unattainable environmental and road safety goals.
Often cheaper, faster, and more fun than a car, Little Vehicles could provide the critical mass that finally drives the automobile to its knees in America’s big cities.
The two elements that could make Little Vehicles a more viable mode for the masses-electrification and heterogeneity of vehicle designs-represent evolutionary changes to the long-static bike concept.
For many of these kinds of trips in cities, Little Vehicles would be faster than travel by car, especially during periods of heavy traffic.
The well-capitalized Little Vehicle industry can also help pay for these changes, as evidenced by Bird’s Save Our Sidewalks pledge, which suggests that these companies pay cities $1 per vehicle per day for infrastructure improvements.
In addition to street design improvements, the biggest thing cities can do to make Little Vehicles a safe, reliable, and popular transportation mode is implementing congestion charges for cars, said Susan Shaheen, a professor of transportation engineering at UC Berkeley.
On a Little Vehicle, you get up close and personal with the city and those who inhabit it-making eye contact with others much more often than you would from a car, and perhaps even exchanging pleasantries with pedestrians or fellow riders at a red light.
These dopey new Little Vehicles seem like the most appropriate way to move about this city of play.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tesla can change so much with over-the-air updates that it’s messing with some owners’ heads”

Tesla has shipped OTA updates to its cars for years now that have changed everything from its Autopilot driver assistance system to the layout and look of its touchscreen interfaces.
Tesla is ahead of other carmakers when it comes OTA updates – just look at the recent mini FCA fiasco.
Some have veered into conspiracy territory, noting that the perceived acceleration change happened right around the same time that Tesla announced a new “Performance” version of the Model 3.
By adopting the behavior of issuing regular OTA software updates – ones that can apparently affect things so deep in the car that the company can demonstrably improve braking distance – Tesla has started to open itself up to the same kinds of controversies and conspiracies that some consumer electronics giants have famously dealt with.
The way Tesla is using software, and specifically how liberally it’s changing its cars with OTA updates, puts the automaker and its customers in a similar position, according to Marcelo Rinesi, the chief technology officer for the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies.
He says Tesla is particularly vulnerable because the company hangs so much of its reputation on the idea of “New technology.”
Even though Tesla might face more scrutiny, the company has made a long list of improvements to its cars over the six years that it’s been shipping OTA updates.
No one else offers what Tesla is selling – yet And where iPhone users have the choice of switching to phones made by Samsung or Google if they’re not happy with what Apple’s doing, there’s no one offering the same kind of experience that Tesla sells when it comes to the idea of an upgradeable car.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Cheaper to Uber Than Own a Car in These Cities”

There were a lot of tidbits in there covering everything from what city is likely to be the next big tech hub to how people are shopping on the internet.
According to Meeker’s report, it’s cheaper to take Uber than to own a car in four out of the five largest cities in the United States, Techcrunch highlighted this weekend.
Dallas, the final city in the nation’s top five, it’s cheaper to own a car.
The fact that it’s cheaper to take a ride-sharing service than drive isn’t exactly a surprising one.
A parking space for a car in the lot behind my apartment is $350 a month.
So I can get a ride and not have to worry about parking or insurance or a car payment for less than half of what it would cost for me to just leave my car overnight – kind of a no-brainer.
I’d venture to say for most large cities, ride-sharing probably makes more sense than car ownership.
When you move somewhere where everyone has their own driveway and parking is earlier to find, the reverse is more likely to be true.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Self-driving technology is going to change a lot more than cars”

When people think about self-driving cars, they naturally think about, well, cars.
Nuro is building self-driving cars for moving goods instead of people, and it recently applied for permission to test its fully driverless vehicles in Arizona.
Because Nuro’s cars don’t need room for passengers-or all the safety equipment a human rider needs-Nuro’s cars can be much smaller and lighter than a conventional car.
Without the need to pay a driver, on-demand deliveries will become much cheaper, so a lot more stores will offer delivery services.
Most people get around town by driving their own cars.
To buy stuff, they drive their own cars to the store, then drive home with their purchases.
The self-driving revolution is going to fundamentally change the economics of all of these markets.
As on-demand delivery options get more affordable, some people who would previously have driven to the store will let stores send stuff to them instead. Others will shift from two-day shipping on Amazon to 30-minute shipping using an on-demand service.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Should You Ride an Electric Scooter?”

Then one day I found myself late to work and staring a scooter in the face.
Five minutes after stepping on the scooter for the first time, I had mastered it.
Confident of my stability, I brought the scooter to its top speed: 15 miles per hour.
First, I was more likely to respect traffic laws on a scooter than on a bike, because I wasn’t as worried about conserving my momentum on a scooter.
Second, riding a scooter is reminiscent of riding a Segway-even if you, like me, have never ridden a Segway in your life.
The day after that, I took a scooter four miles across the city to a baseball game.
The following week, after an early-morning appointment, I spent 20 minutes searching the neighborhood for a scooter so that I wouldn’t have to take a Lyft.
What became clear in those first few days-and what I’m a little shocked to be writing now-is that electric scooters are a novel mode of transportation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s Why CarMax Makes More Money On Used Cars Than Anyone Else”

Now, what makes CarMax such a draw for used car buyers is excellent marketing that espouses a low-stress, hassle-free car buying experience.
The margin for negotiation is often in the hundreds of dollars and more major retailers are adopting similar “No-haggle” pricing policies, but unlike CarMax, other large used car dealers like Sonic and AutoNation are using market data to be aggressive with their used car prices in the hope that they move units quickly.
Yes, the cars are ostensibly in good shape and can include generous warranties, but many buyers wonder about the several thousand-dollar premium they command over other used cars.
In Colorado, CarMax is selling a 2016 Toyota Highlander XLE with 26,000 miles for a no-haggle price of $32,998.
In North Carolina, CarMax has a 2016 BMW 328i with 25,000 miles with the no-haggle price of $26,998.
Perhaps you are looking for a pickup truck, you could get a used 2018 F-150 Lariat with 14,000 miles from CarMax for about $41,000.
Some will argue that CarMax cars are of better quality than other pre-owned vehicles, but there have been lawsuits that took issue with the veracity of CarMax’s inspection procedures.
The fact that CarMax makes is the most profitable used car retailer in the country, is mostly the direct result of buyers often paying more for cars then they could have found elsewhere with a similar “No-haggle” experience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “More and more people are now keeping their car keys in the microwave”

As the name suggests, keyless thefts are those targeting cars that don’t need a key in the ignition to get started.
While this change in technology has certainly made things convenient for drivers – you can simply get in and start the car up without having to take your key out of your pocket – it’s also provided an opportunity for crooks.
They then use these to essentially boost the signal from your key, tricking your car into thinking the key fob is next to the vehicle, allowing the thieves to get in and make off with your motor.
These thefts are often carried out from outside your home too, as it’s a pretty safe bet that your keys will be inside the house.
A recent study by Tracker suggested that the vast majority of motorists with keyless vehicles are at risk of this crime, in part because of where they leave their car keys overnight – sticking them in the hallway for example or on a keyhook downstairs, areas which are relatively accessible for thieves roaming outside the property with an amplifier.
Y Barrs, head of police liaison at Tracker, said: “We’re seeing more and more of these relay attacks taking place across the country. It’s clear from our survey that many people are unintentionally leaving themselves vulnerable to these kinds of attack, by putting their keys in easy reach of relay devices.”
While the relay devices used by car thieves can receive signals through walls, doors and windows, they can’t handle metal.
David Howells, car security expert at the retailer, said: “In-car security systems can only do so much to prevent a car being stolen. It seems that many anti-theft systems can be easily bypassed and using a simple device like an RFID wallet can prevent your fob being hacked.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Find out how much car you can afford with 20/4/10 rule”

Knowing how much car you can afford is the first step to buying one.
That’s why I want to take a deeper look at buying a car – and show you tactics to get the most out of your car negotiations.
How many times have you seen someone sink a bunch of money into a flashy luxury car with with a bunch of unnecessary additions only for them to end up trying to sell it with a few years?
If you truly want to get the best deal out of your car purchase, you’re going to have to negotiate IWT style.
A lot of people want to prioritize how a car looks over anything else.
You should really prioritize getting a good, reliable car that you’ll be able to drive around for at least 10 years.
I’d rather you get a new car that’s reliable than purchasing a used car that’ll break down sooner.
You don’t want to end up struggling because you can’t afford your monthly car payment.

The orginal article.