Summary of “How To Get A Job Without Prior Experience”

Here’s the challenge everyone who starts their career faces: You can’t get a job because you don’t have experience, but you can’t get experience without getting a job.
It’s called the experience paradox or Catch-22 of getting a job.
“Create a resume, browse job boards, and respond to job applications.” Sorry to disappoint you.
When you do the following 2 things, you will become better-that will significantly increase your odds of getting a job without prior experience.
The reality is that there’s a massive difference between someone who doesn’t have experience at a particular job and someone who has two years under their belt.
Even though two years might not sound like a lot of time, it’s actually a lot of time to learn the ins and outs of a job.
If you seek out companies who hire for experience and skills, you have a good chance of getting hired-even if you don’t have experience.
So how can you do free work? Larry Stybel, a clinical psychologist, wrote an article for HBR about his experience launching his career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Want A Dream Career, Ask Yourself These 3 Questions”

Have you ever thought about how long your career actually lasts? If you ask me, your career ends when your life ends.
You want to pick a career that gives you a good outlook.
The last thing you want to become is an unfulfilled career hopper.
A person who likes everything and picks a different career every two years.
That’s why you want to make a smart decision about what kind of career you pursue.
I’ve personally used the advice from the renowned management consultant, Peter Drucker, to create a career that’s fulfilling.
Answering these questions have helped me to create my dream career.
When you answer these three questions, I’m sure you will find your dream career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 career reflection questions you should ask yourself”

3 minute Read. As 2018 comes to a close, career reflection is the most important thing you can do to prepare for the year ahead. It offers you the opportunity to look back, see what goals you already met, and figure out where you’re at with regards to your long-term goals.
Here are the questions you should be asking before you set your career resolutions for 2019.Does your work matter?
Do they matter to those around you? Do they matter to your employer? Do they matter to society? If you start here and can honestly say that your work matters, you’re well on your way to a rewarding career.
When you look back on the past year, ask yourself if you managed to keep up with the technological changes in your field.
Your career will fast-track itself when your professional peers see you as the technology driver.
Did you work all of this year without giving much thought to where you will be down the road? Where will you be in five years? Ten years? To get to where you want to be, you need to identify where you need to be at various stages of your career.
What roles and responsibilities did they take on? What skills did they acquire along the way? How did they network and get those responsible for their career development to notice and advance their careers? From that learning, map out your game plan so that you don’t leave your career advancement to chance.
Just like everything else in life, career success and satisfaction won’t come without strong intentions on your part.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do If Your Career Is Stalled and You Don’t Know Why”

Members of her executive team were strong in their current roles but none was quite right for the top job.
“Executive presence” was mentioned in several reviews as an improvement area, but without any specifics, Tom had no idea what the real issue was and how damaging it could be to his career.
Having assessed over 2,000 CEOs and over 18,000 C-suite leaders since 1995, we are struck by how often careers of talented executives stall or even derail because of seemingly trivial issues, many of which are utterly fixable.
Often executives who fail to appear confident get comments about lackluster executive presence.
GhSMART has assembled a data set of assessments of over 18,000 C-suite executives across all major industry sectors and company sizes.
Each executive assessment includes detailed career and educational histories; performance appraisals; and information on patterns of behavior, decisions, and business results.
While in-group bias is a deep and persistent issue in hiring, we found that at least for some of these executives their insufficient language fluency lead them to be perceived as less competent than they were and that as this bias was brought to light and they worked to improve fluency and reduce the accent, their career trajectory improved.
We often see talented executives hitting home runs in their own division and striking out with their peer group.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: When Getting Fired Is Good for Your Career”

We conducted additional research on 360 executives, analyzing their careers in depth.
While all of them experienced a variety of setbacks, 18% of executives in this dataset faced what many view as the very worst-case scenario: getting fired or laid off.
The good news: 68% of executives who had been let go landed in a new job within six months.
Even better? 91% of executives who had been fired took a job of similar or even greater levels of seniority.
In our study, when the interview process included expert third-party assessors engaged by employers to prevent hiring mistakes, 33% of executives who had been previously fired were recommended for hire – compared to 27% of candidates who had never been fired.
Each executive assessment includes detailed career and educational histories; performance appraisals; and information on patterns of behavior, decisions, and business results.
Taking ownership without shame enabled these executives to show themselves as likeable and confident in the interview process for the next role – qualities proven to increase chances of getting the job.
The most important advice both for those looking to rebound and to prevent getting fired in the first place: Pick jobs in the “Bull’s eye” of your skills and motivations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do If There’s No Clear Career Path for You at Your Company”

These days, the culprit preventing many professionals from identifying a clear career path at their company is simply that one no longer exists.
As Cathy Benko and Molly Anderson predicted in their 2010 book, we’ve gone from a corporate ladder to a Corporate Lattice, in which professionals’ career progress may only sometimes be linear – and often, may instead appear diagonal or horizontal.
One appeal of the traditional linear career path was that it didn’t take much research: while not everyone achieved the end goal, it was very clear what it was.
Even if your employer isn’t providing explicit guidance about your career path, they’re likely to recognize and appreciate the value of an engaged employee who is raising their hand and asking for support.
In my book Reinventing You, I profiled a management consultant named Joanne Chang who reinvented herself into a successful career as a chef.
In many ways, shifting to a new role inside your company can feel as dramatic a career change as moving from being a management consultant to being a chef.
As you progress at your company and in your career, it’s essential to keep your mentors and sponsors informed about your progress, so they’re aware of new skills you’ve developed and your current career aspirations.
It may feel disconcerting if your company hasn’t crafted a linear career progression for you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to test your ability to do a job you’ve never done”

Most of the things you learned in college are of very limited use, the majority of future jobs do not exist today, and a large percentage of jobs within organizations remain unfilled because there aren’t enough people willing and able to do those jobs.
One of the things that will help you futureproof your career is to figure out whether you have the potential for jobs that you haven’t done in the past.
Even if you don’t have the right skills for a given job yet, being interested in that job will increase the likelihood you’ll be able to acquire them.
Being an extrovert gives you an advantage in jobs that require a great deal of interpersonal relations, such as sales, customer service, and PR jobs, but being an introvert will give you an edge when it comes to working independently, focusing on detailed tasks for extended periods of time, and listening to others.
If you find a job that is a natural fit for your style and behavioral preferences, you can turn your personality into a powerful career-building tool.
Of course, it is perfectly possible to learn and develop skills for jobs that are less naturally suited to our personality, but it will require more time, effort, and won’t always be enjoyable.
This is why so many employers are making curiosity one of the key hiring criteria, and why it’s so important to demonstrate that you’re a quick study during job interviews.
While working out whether something is interesting or not is easy, you will better understand what new jobs really require from you, how your personality differs from others, and how much you’re able to learn quickly, if you ask other people to tell you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ramona Shelburne on living pregnancy and motherhood out loud”

You’re not supposed to lose out on opportunities in the enlightened, post-“Lean In” workplace, but let’s be real.
No, the one thing I connected with deeply from watching Serena’s journey was how empowering it was to see a woman live a vulnerable period of her life out loud.
There were times I had to raise my hand to come out of the game and risk whatever consequences came with that.
I’d earned that respect, and rather than take the easier way out by pulling me out of the rotation, I could sit out of writing on Game 3 and come back for Game 4.
Later, after LeBron committed to the Lakers, I had to text my SportsCenter producer, Hilary Guy, and say I had about 45 minutes in me, but then I had to get out of the chair and lie down.
In college, I’d watch our football team on my way out to the softball field for practice.
A player would get hurt, and everything would stop for 30 seconds or so while the trainers checked him out.
What I’m asking is why do those “Consequences” have to be negative? Can we open ourselves to the idea that living out loud and standing behind your choice to have a family – or not to have a family – might actually make a woman stronger, more powerful and better at what she does?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can You Afford to Change Your Career?”

Who wouldn’t want a meaningful career and better balance between work and home? For many of us, it’s finances that keep us from making a career change.
We worry and wonder: What would a career change do to our bank accounts? To our way of life? To our family? We assume that a major reinvention would involve a gap between paychecks when we’d leave our job and break into a new field.
Like Steve, Amanda, and Brandon, we’re all drawn to career change for different reasons.
What if something unexpected happens in your new career? Or what if you can’t sell your home? Building or adding to an existing emergency fund will help ease the stress and worry of beginning a new career.
If your risk tolerance is fairly low but your proposed career change is one that will reduce your income by 75%, then you’ll probably want to rethink your choice.
Steve’s career change required different stages of setting and managing expectations with his wife, as his transition came in two phases that took place over four years.
Steve and his wife deliberated for a full year before he moved into the unpaid student phase of his career change.
The financial implications of a career change weigh heavily on the mind of anyone considering doing something different.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Beat Mid-Career Malaise”

If you find yourself dwelling on what holds you back, Johnson recommends “Reframing the constraints.” When you’re young and you can live and work anywhere in the world, plotting your career path is incredibly daunting – “Almost paralyzing,” she says.
One possible remedy, Petriglieri says, is to consider what kinds of small “Changes you can make to bring yourself more fully to your work.” Even if you cannot change your circumstances, “You might be able to change the microenvironment in which you operate.” For instance, you could seek out an exciting and immersive project, hire employees with different backgrounds, or join an internal committee or team that will stretch you in new and different ways.
“When you can see how your work is being used by others, it is hard not to find meaning.” Otherwise it’s easy to lose sight of why you do what you do; it can become “Too theoretical.”
In these cases, working with a career coach can be helpful, Petriglieri says.
“Maybe your malaise is due to the fact that you have all your eggs in one basket.” It could be that you need to seek self-worth and life satisfaction outside of work – perhaps through your family or faith, a charity you support, or a project, hobby, or sport you’re passionate about.
“A colleague of mine suggested the idea as a way to better my own career and transform how I approached my work,” he says.
In Joel’s case, his interests and abilities centered on connecting people and ensuring that the people on his team and others work well together.
James readily admits that his new role is hard work – and the pay is paltry.

The orginal article.