Summary of “How to Mentor Someone Who Doesn’t Know What Their Career Goals Should Be”

“Tell me about your career goals.” How often have you said this to a person you’re managing or mentoring, only to get a blank stare in return? Perhaps the person confides that they don’t know what their goals should be, or even whether there are opportunities to advance at your company.
The results of CEB’s 2015 employee survey capture the problem well: 70% of employees surveyed reported being dissatisfied with career opportunities at their company – a disturbing figure given that it is one of the biggest drivers of engagement and retention.
We’d like to propose a radical diagnosis: The problem lives not in a lack of career opportunities, but rather in the very concept of a career.
We are suffering from the career myth – a delusional belief in the outdated idea of linear career progression.
Let’s return to the employee who needs direction and feels stuck and confused about their career.
First, we tell employees that it is fine and even preferable not to have a concrete career path in mind.
Rather than investing in one path, we tell employees, they should diversify their career capital.
The scary thing about accepting the career myth is acknowledging that you don’t know what comes next.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These are the 5 “super skills” you need for jobs of the future”

The evolving workplace is creating a skills divide, says Adam Miller, CEO of Cornerstone, a talent management software and systems provider that partnered with IFTF to create a future skills study.
“We have a very large group of jobs that require relatively few high-level skills, and a lot of those jobs will become obsolete in the future, being automated away,” he says.
“On the flip side, highly technical jobs are wide open because there aren’t enough people with the skills to fill them. Whether or not employees recognize it, the half-life of their skills is shorter than it used to be.”
“It’s skills that are gathered that build your reputational portfolio. It can be that you’re a financial wizard, dependable or creative. You begin to blend softer, more qualitative skills that are not reflected in traditional academics.”
You’ll need to know how to assemble teams of humans, robots, and bots and get them all to work together, according to IFTF: “Your AI assistants will promise you convenience and efficiency, but you’ll need to know how to tap their intelligence to do more, to accomplish things you could never do before.”
“You’ll need to master the many different kinds of trade: open, private, or public goods. And with the world shifting shapes all the time, you’ll need to think like a designer to make the shapes you want,” according to IFTF. “To be successful in building a career and maintaining financial stability in this environment, relying on your personal network is key,” says Jim Davis, assistant director of Pace University’s Career Services Department.
“You need to be accepting of the new skills you have to have,” he says.
“You need to be comfortable with change and you need to be willing to develop new skills.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Successful Ethnic Group in the U.S. May Surprise You”

Nigerians are entering the medical field in the U.S. at an increased rate, leaving their home country to work in American hospitals, where they can earn more and work in better facilities.
Last year, President Donald Trump reportedly said in an Oval Office discussion that Nigerians would never go back to “Their huts” once they saw America.
After the war against Biafra separatists in the ’60s, the Nigerian government sponsored scholarships for students to pursue higher education abroad. English-speaking Nigerian students excelled at universities in the U.S. and U.K., often finding opportunities to continue their education or begin their professional career in their host country.
Dr. Jacqueline Nwando Olayiwola was born in Columbus, Ohio, to such Nigerian immigrant parents.
Her parents did return, but with few jobs available in the economic decline of the 1980s, many Nigerians did not.
Makanjuola intended to one day pursue her career in Nigeria as her parents had, but it’s too hard to leave the U.S., she says: “Many Nigerians intend to go back, but it’s impractical because there’s more opportunity here.”
Anyone from the Nigerian diaspora will tell you their parents gave them three career choices: doctor, lawyer or engineer.
What about Nigerians who come to the U.S. and don’t succeed? Wey, the activist chef, says there’s a lot of pressure to fit a certain mold when you’re Nigerian.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony’s Failed OKC Experiment”

Carmelo Anthony was bad in the playoff series that ended his first season on the Thunder.
The Nuggets hadn’t made the playoffs for eight years prior to Anthony’s arrival in 2003; with Carmelo on the roster, they immediately began a seven-year playoff streak.
In Oklahoma City’s first-round loss to the Jazz, Anthony was “Bad” in the same way that an unexplained wad of human hair in a fast-food meal is bad. When Anthony was off the court, the Thunder stood a chance-in fact, OKC outscored the Jazz by 32 combined points in the series when Anthony was benched.
We’re left frustrated because the things Carmelo wants are still different from the things we want from Carmelo.
On two stages, Carmelo has proved himself as one of the most important players in basketball.
Ah, yes, Olympic Melo: Playing as a power forward or even a center, Carmelo feasted against international big men who had to choose between guarding his shot or his drive.
We’ll never see a player like Carmelo Anthony again.
Did Carmelo play poorly this season because he hated his non-star turn? Or did Carmelo hate this season because he played poorly? Carmelo’s chickens and eggs will sum up his NBA career: Maybe he was “Bad” as a result of his poor decisions and misguided priorities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lessons I’ve learned about success in the last 25 years”

I like writing about timeless lessons for success or key behaviors that lead to success.
I’ve even written about famous failures that will inspire you to success.
Nothing has spurned a more introspective look at achieving success than my turning a half-century old.
If approval equals success for you, know it’s a never-ending quest.
Success is drawn to those who zap energy into a workplace with their enthusiasm, passion, and optimism and repelled by those who sap energy with their pessimism, gossip, and negative attitude.
Lifting others up as you do so, with the intent to go beyond success to significance, is better.
Constant comparison to others is the surest way to undermine your success.
The Navy’s first female Rear Admiral, Grace Murray Hopper, once said “Ships in port are safe. But that’s not what ships are made for.” I’ve so often seen that success depends on the willingness to take risks, learn from them, and keep moving forward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Books To Read When You’re Considering Making A Big Change”

Reading books helped me push past that fear, and also gave me some much needed perspective.
If you’re thinking about changing careers, here are a few books you might want to read to help you figure out what to do next.
If you have a crazy dream but don’t know how to start, this book can help you identify your next steps and the level of risk that’s appropriate for you based on your personal circumstances.
Making a career change involves making decisions when we don’t know what’s going to happen.
While Lewis’s book can help you outline and execute your next steps, Duke’s book can help you decide whether that next step is the right one to take in the first place.
Even if you’re not interested in being an entrepreneur, this book offers plenty of lessons on taking on “Risky” endeavors.
If nothing else, this book reinforces that the cliché, “Everything has a silver lining,” really does apply in life.
What if you don’t know what that work should be? This book is a great place to start.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Pick a Career”

This post isn’t me giving you career advice really-it’s a framework that I think can help you make career decisions that actually reflect who you are, what you want, and what our rapidly changing career landscape looks like today.
The particulars of your career also often play a big role in determining where you live, how flexible your life is, the kinds of things you’re able to do in your free time, and sometimes even in who you end up marrying.
On top of your career being the way you spend much of your time and the means of support for the rest of your time, your career triples as your primary mode of impact-making.
In the cook-chef post, I designed a simple framework for how a chef makes major career choices.
The overlapping area contains your good career path choices-good arrows to draw on your Career Map.
For a career option to qualify for your Reality Box, your potential in that career area has to measure up to the objective difficulty of achieving success in that area.
If you can figure out how to get a reasonably accurate picture of the real career landscape out there, you have a massive edge over everyone else, most of whom will be using conventional wisdom as their instruction booklet.
Eric Barker’s blog is full of actual data that can help with career choices, like this post on what makes a career fulfilling or this one on the importance of mentors.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Questions to Ask Yourself at Every Point in Your Career”

When you’re going about your day-to-day, it’s easy to put important questions about your career-what you really want to do, how you get there-on the backburner as you complete the tasks you need to get done now.
Once you decide what you want to be good in your career, ask yourself what skills you need to succeed.
“Figuring out the skills we want to use and develop and the work we’d like to do takes time and experimentation, but it’s a far more practical way to get closer to what we actually want out of our jobs,” writes Jones.
So ask yourself what role you want it to play in your life.
What sacrifices will you have to make in other parts of your life to make it work, if any? What work will you be giving up? On the flip side, it’s totally fine to not want to be management.
Is your career giving you enough money, time and flexibility to do the things in your life that are more important than working? Now’s the time to reflect on what’s important to you, and whether or not you to need to change your life around a bit to focus on those things.
So ask yourself if there was something you wished you were good at, or if there’s another industry that’s appealing? Might you want to start your own business or side hustle as a new challenge?
Were you a mentor? Did you want to be? Consider your reputation and what you want to leave behind when you retire.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Isn’t the World a Matriarchy?”

Women live 5 to 8 years longer, and their careers tend to have more variety over their lifespans.
Whereas the women, on average, were more concerned with fairness: that members of society should not go without what they needed, and that they had a role to play in ensuring that fairness.
There were more men in STEM careers than there were women.
The weight of the evidence shows that most women and men are pretty similar on average, and that the differences are more evident at the extremes.
Fewer women than men were unemployed, and fewer women committed suicide due to financial losses and a complete loss of identity.
3 What they found was that the more gender equal a country was, as determined by the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report, the fewer women ultimately took up STEM paths in college.
In contrast, countries with almost no protections, with few guarantees for women and where life satisfaction is low-such as Algeria, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, and Albania-had by far the highest representation of women in STEM, approaching the researchers’ estimates of 41 percent, based on how well girls do in math and science in high school, without considering their other skills.
“If the environment offers options for a good life in multiple domains of work, then girls choose to pursue what they are best at relative to their other abilities. This might be STEM, or it might be law, for example. However, if the environment offers limited options and if the best options are in STEM careers, girls tend to focus more on their skills in STEM. The key is that girls and women are making choices that maximize their success, and these choices are not always for careers in STEM.” In places where girls and women feel they have the freedom to make their own choices, in other words, they are more likely to act on their personal strengths and interests.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Being a Two-Career Couple Requires a Long-Term Plan”

Kate and her husband, Matthew, were a classic dual career couple.
One of their innovations was to plan a lifetime family career – together.
Dual income couples are now the norm: over two thirds of couples in Canada and the UK, and 60% of couples in the U.S. They are beginning to realize they may each be the other’s most significant career asset.
As careers morph into 50-year marathons rather than 30-year sprints, we may also want to think of couple careers over much longer timeframes.
One career is clearly dominant, and will define where the couple lives, and where they move to.
Parallelograms – two parallel, high-powered careers, sometimes called “Power couples.” Increasing in number, these careers are often mutually reinforcing, with professional networks and knowledge that feed each other, think House of Cards.
Complements – diversity in couple careers can be as beneficial as diversity in any team.
You may move from one model to another over the course of ever-longer careers, and that may even be part of the plan.

The orginal article.