Summary of “How to test your ability to do a job you’ve never done”

Most of the things you learned in college are of very limited use, the majority of future jobs do not exist today, and a large percentage of jobs within organizations remain unfilled because there aren’t enough people willing and able to do those jobs.
One of the things that will help you futureproof your career is to figure out whether you have the potential for jobs that you haven’t done in the past.
Even if you don’t have the right skills for a given job yet, being interested in that job will increase the likelihood you’ll be able to acquire them.
Being an extrovert gives you an advantage in jobs that require a great deal of interpersonal relations, such as sales, customer service, and PR jobs, but being an introvert will give you an edge when it comes to working independently, focusing on detailed tasks for extended periods of time, and listening to others.
If you find a job that is a natural fit for your style and behavioral preferences, you can turn your personality into a powerful career-building tool.
Of course, it is perfectly possible to learn and develop skills for jobs that are less naturally suited to our personality, but it will require more time, effort, and won’t always be enjoyable.
This is why so many employers are making curiosity one of the key hiring criteria, and why it’s so important to demonstrate that you’re a quick study during job interviews.
While working out whether something is interesting or not is easy, you will better understand what new jobs really require from you, how your personality differs from others, and how much you’re able to learn quickly, if you ask other people to tell you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ramona Shelburne on living pregnancy and motherhood out loud”

You’re not supposed to lose out on opportunities in the enlightened, post-“Lean In” workplace, but let’s be real.
No, the one thing I connected with deeply from watching Serena’s journey was how empowering it was to see a woman live a vulnerable period of her life out loud.
There were times I had to raise my hand to come out of the game and risk whatever consequences came with that.
I’d earned that respect, and rather than take the easier way out by pulling me out of the rotation, I could sit out of writing on Game 3 and come back for Game 4.
Later, after LeBron committed to the Lakers, I had to text my SportsCenter producer, Hilary Guy, and say I had about 45 minutes in me, but then I had to get out of the chair and lie down.
In college, I’d watch our football team on my way out to the softball field for practice.
A player would get hurt, and everything would stop for 30 seconds or so while the trainers checked him out.
What I’m asking is why do those “Consequences” have to be negative? Can we open ourselves to the idea that living out loud and standing behind your choice to have a family – or not to have a family – might actually make a woman stronger, more powerful and better at what she does?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can You Afford to Change Your Career?”

Who wouldn’t want a meaningful career and better balance between work and home? For many of us, it’s finances that keep us from making a career change.
We worry and wonder: What would a career change do to our bank accounts? To our way of life? To our family? We assume that a major reinvention would involve a gap between paychecks when we’d leave our job and break into a new field.
Like Steve, Amanda, and Brandon, we’re all drawn to career change for different reasons.
What if something unexpected happens in your new career? Or what if you can’t sell your home? Building or adding to an existing emergency fund will help ease the stress and worry of beginning a new career.
If your risk tolerance is fairly low but your proposed career change is one that will reduce your income by 75%, then you’ll probably want to rethink your choice.
Steve’s career change required different stages of setting and managing expectations with his wife, as his transition came in two phases that took place over four years.
Steve and his wife deliberated for a full year before he moved into the unpaid student phase of his career change.
The financial implications of a career change weigh heavily on the mind of anyone considering doing something different.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Beat Mid-Career Malaise”

If you find yourself dwelling on what holds you back, Johnson recommends “Reframing the constraints.” When you’re young and you can live and work anywhere in the world, plotting your career path is incredibly daunting – “Almost paralyzing,” she says.
One possible remedy, Petriglieri says, is to consider what kinds of small “Changes you can make to bring yourself more fully to your work.” Even if you cannot change your circumstances, “You might be able to change the microenvironment in which you operate.” For instance, you could seek out an exciting and immersive project, hire employees with different backgrounds, or join an internal committee or team that will stretch you in new and different ways.
“When you can see how your work is being used by others, it is hard not to find meaning.” Otherwise it’s easy to lose sight of why you do what you do; it can become “Too theoretical.”
In these cases, working with a career coach can be helpful, Petriglieri says.
“Maybe your malaise is due to the fact that you have all your eggs in one basket.” It could be that you need to seek self-worth and life satisfaction outside of work – perhaps through your family or faith, a charity you support, or a project, hobby, or sport you’re passionate about.
“A colleague of mine suggested the idea as a way to better my own career and transform how I approached my work,” he says.
In Joel’s case, his interests and abilities centered on connecting people and ensuring that the people on his team and others work well together.
James readily admits that his new role is hard work – and the pay is paltry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why quitting your job without a backup plan can help your career”

“Sometimes you need time to detox and heal from abusive situations so that you don’t jump into something just as bad to get away from your current job,” says Rhonda Ansted, career coach and Founder of Be the Change Career Consulting.
Leaving your job without any savings in the bank is likely to lead to you feeling forced to take any job out of financial necessity.
If you can’t job search while working your current job.
Looking for a new job while employed means you can never truly give your all to your search, and you may not have the time to explore all of the opportunities available, never mind booking time off to go to interviews.
“It didn’t feel fair to the company I was working for, and it would have limited the time I was able to spend charting my next move,” says First, who quit her job without having another one lined up, freeing up her time to do a thorough job search.
Quitting your job without a backup plan has the same effect on your nervous system as walking into the desert without any water.
Assess the toll your unhappiness in your current job is having on your health.
Quitting your job with no plan in place allows you to be open to new opportunities that you may never have considered if you simply took the next opportunity that fell in your lap.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Mentor Someone Who Doesn’t Know What Their Career Goals Should Be”

“Tell me about your career goals.” How often have you said this to a person you’re managing or mentoring, only to get a blank stare in return? Perhaps the person confides that they don’t know what their goals should be, or even whether there are opportunities to advance at your company.
The results of CEB’s 2015 employee survey capture the problem well: 70% of employees surveyed reported being dissatisfied with career opportunities at their company – a disturbing figure given that it is one of the biggest drivers of engagement and retention.
We’d like to propose a radical diagnosis: The problem lives not in a lack of career opportunities, but rather in the very concept of a career.
We are suffering from the career myth – a delusional belief in the outdated idea of linear career progression.
Let’s return to the employee who needs direction and feels stuck and confused about their career.
First, we tell employees that it is fine and even preferable not to have a concrete career path in mind.
Rather than investing in one path, we tell employees, they should diversify their career capital.
The scary thing about accepting the career myth is acknowledging that you don’t know what comes next.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These are the 5 “super skills” you need for jobs of the future”

The evolving workplace is creating a skills divide, says Adam Miller, CEO of Cornerstone, a talent management software and systems provider that partnered with IFTF to create a future skills study.
“We have a very large group of jobs that require relatively few high-level skills, and a lot of those jobs will become obsolete in the future, being automated away,” he says.
“On the flip side, highly technical jobs are wide open because there aren’t enough people with the skills to fill them. Whether or not employees recognize it, the half-life of their skills is shorter than it used to be.”
“It’s skills that are gathered that build your reputational portfolio. It can be that you’re a financial wizard, dependable or creative. You begin to blend softer, more qualitative skills that are not reflected in traditional academics.”
You’ll need to know how to assemble teams of humans, robots, and bots and get them all to work together, according to IFTF: “Your AI assistants will promise you convenience and efficiency, but you’ll need to know how to tap their intelligence to do more, to accomplish things you could never do before.”
“You’ll need to master the many different kinds of trade: open, private, or public goods. And with the world shifting shapes all the time, you’ll need to think like a designer to make the shapes you want,” according to IFTF. “To be successful in building a career and maintaining financial stability in this environment, relying on your personal network is key,” says Jim Davis, assistant director of Pace University’s Career Services Department.
“You need to be accepting of the new skills you have to have,” he says.
“You need to be comfortable with change and you need to be willing to develop new skills.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Successful Ethnic Group in the U.S. May Surprise You”

Nigerians are entering the medical field in the U.S. at an increased rate, leaving their home country to work in American hospitals, where they can earn more and work in better facilities.
Last year, President Donald Trump reportedly said in an Oval Office discussion that Nigerians would never go back to “Their huts” once they saw America.
After the war against Biafra separatists in the ’60s, the Nigerian government sponsored scholarships for students to pursue higher education abroad. English-speaking Nigerian students excelled at universities in the U.S. and U.K., often finding opportunities to continue their education or begin their professional career in their host country.
Dr. Jacqueline Nwando Olayiwola was born in Columbus, Ohio, to such Nigerian immigrant parents.
Her parents did return, but with few jobs available in the economic decline of the 1980s, many Nigerians did not.
Makanjuola intended to one day pursue her career in Nigeria as her parents had, but it’s too hard to leave the U.S., she says: “Many Nigerians intend to go back, but it’s impractical because there’s more opportunity here.”
Anyone from the Nigerian diaspora will tell you their parents gave them three career choices: doctor, lawyer or engineer.
What about Nigerians who come to the U.S. and don’t succeed? Wey, the activist chef, says there’s a lot of pressure to fit a certain mold when you’re Nigerian.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony’s Failed OKC Experiment”

Carmelo Anthony was bad in the playoff series that ended his first season on the Thunder.
The Nuggets hadn’t made the playoffs for eight years prior to Anthony’s arrival in 2003; with Carmelo on the roster, they immediately began a seven-year playoff streak.
In Oklahoma City’s first-round loss to the Jazz, Anthony was “Bad” in the same way that an unexplained wad of human hair in a fast-food meal is bad. When Anthony was off the court, the Thunder stood a chance-in fact, OKC outscored the Jazz by 32 combined points in the series when Anthony was benched.
We’re left frustrated because the things Carmelo wants are still different from the things we want from Carmelo.
On two stages, Carmelo has proved himself as one of the most important players in basketball.
Ah, yes, Olympic Melo: Playing as a power forward or even a center, Carmelo feasted against international big men who had to choose between guarding his shot or his drive.
We’ll never see a player like Carmelo Anthony again.
Did Carmelo play poorly this season because he hated his non-star turn? Or did Carmelo hate this season because he played poorly? Carmelo’s chickens and eggs will sum up his NBA career: Maybe he was “Bad” as a result of his poor decisions and misguided priorities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lessons I’ve learned about success in the last 25 years”

I like writing about timeless lessons for success or key behaviors that lead to success.
I’ve even written about famous failures that will inspire you to success.
Nothing has spurned a more introspective look at achieving success than my turning a half-century old.
If approval equals success for you, know it’s a never-ending quest.
Success is drawn to those who zap energy into a workplace with their enthusiasm, passion, and optimism and repelled by those who sap energy with their pessimism, gossip, and negative attitude.
Lifting others up as you do so, with the intent to go beyond success to significance, is better.
Constant comparison to others is the surest way to undermine your success.
The Navy’s first female Rear Admiral, Grace Murray Hopper, once said “Ships in port are safe. But that’s not what ships are made for.” I’ve so often seen that success depends on the willingness to take risks, learn from them, and keep moving forward.

The orginal article.