Summary of “The Books Every New Graduate Should Read, According to a Dozen Business Leaders”

We asked a dozen business leaders-from CEOs of big companies and startups, to deans of leading business schools-what books they would put in the hands of a newly minted graduate.
The Boys in the Boat Daniel James Brown’s account of an underdog rowing team beating the elite squads of the US and Europe on its way to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin is “a vivid description of grit, hustle and, perseverance,” said Mark Hoplamazian, CEO of Hyatt, the hotel company.
Team of Teams Retired general Stanley McChrystal, who led US special operations in Iraq between 2003 and 2008, makes the case for a new way of organizing companies and work around small, nimble teams.
McCrystal shows “How the sum is greater than the parts,” said Bill Clough, CEO of CUI Global, a small industrial conglomerate, and a former police officer and air marshal.
“You can’t possibly know what happened unless you were there, and people don’t always act in rational ways,” said Kathryn Minshew, CEO of The Muse, a job-search site that targets millennials.
“It’s about the mythology of life,” said Rick Goings, former CEO of Tupperware, the houseware company.
“New graduates are charged with developing their relationships with society: family, co-workers, government,” said Jeff Jonas, CEO of SAGE Therapeutics, a biotechnology company.
“If you were a college student and you read that talked about it in a job interview, they’d be really impressed,” said Catherine Engelbert, former CEO of Deloitte, an accounting and consulting firm.

The orginal article.

Summary of “25 Of the Most Inspiring Books Everyone Should Read”

The Only Game in Town: Central Banks, Instability, and Avoiding the Next Collapse by Mohamed A. El-Erian “During my time on Wall Street, I witnessed both high and low times. If you want to understand the modern global economy, you should read this book. El-Erian is an incredibly clear thinker and explains complex ideas in an articulate way that is understandable to the financial novice while engaging to a seasoned industry veteran. Although no one can predict the future, this book comes close.”
A Tale of Three Kings by Gene Edwards “This masterfully written book highlights three leadership styles, culled from the lives of three kings mentioned in the Bible: Saul, David, and Absalom. Whether you are a seasoned business owner or a young entrepreneur, this book is a priceless treatise on the art of identifying and dealing with the good, the bad, and the ugly attitudes of those who sit in the big chair at the office.”
The Art of War by Sun Tzu “A very good friend of mine recently gave me a copy. It’s not a sit-down-and-read-it-in-one session type of book. But I was facing some challenging moments, and she left a copy on my desk with a note that said, ‘You need this.’ I opened a page randomly, and read, ‘Know yourself, and you will win all battles.’ It resonated immediately with me. Sometimes founding a company is like a war-you need discipline, a game plan, confidence, and to understand the enemy. I keep it on my desk for moments when I’m finding things tough. It’s not always relevant, but sometimes it’s a better pep talk than any inspirational Instagram post.”
The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement by Eliyahu Goldratt “This is a story about a business executive dealing with serious challenges at work and in his personal life. It is a good read as a novel, but more interestingly, it is a great business and leadership book. Its theme is that, in life and in business, you should constantly ask ‘What’s the goal?’ before taking any action when faced with a task or challenge. If you establish clear goals and a method of measurement, your action plan is more likely to line up with achieving the goal. The character, Herbie, becomes a metaphor for how to identify constraints and define processes based on these constraints.”
Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim “How to leverage, how to differentiate, and how to hedge-this classic business book inspires me on how to compete in the overcrowded optical and eyewear business. In today’s fast-changing environment, what used to be your strength and competitiveness can be your biggest obstacle in growth and change. One must constantly question, learn, and keep an open mind.”
American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company by Bryce G. Hoffman “This book really resonated with me, because it’s almost a mirror image of what we did with the Sparkling Ice brand. Hoffman dives into how Alan Mulally went into Ford and took a look at the organization as a whole. He shifted the focus to the consumer and recognized the importance of delivering quality products and services. Mulally honored the heritage of the company and used Ford’s identity as a strength to reinvigorate a culture. If you need to enact change in your company without losing its values, this book will be perfect to pull inspiration and tactics from.”
Double Your Profits in 6 Months or Less by Bob Fifer “This book was the most impactful on my career. Other than a small section on technology, the book is a blueprint for how an effective and efficient business should be run. Fifer’s teachings are ingrained in nearly all of TransPerfect’s business systems, and he has personally come and participated in training conferences with our senior management team.”
Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey Moore “I read this book when it was first published and I was a first-time CEO at Cobalt Networks. The book, which focuses on how to bridge the chasms that occur in the transition from a market solely for innovators and early adopters to one that reaches a mainstream audience, proved to be my personal manual for building disruptive companies. For those in management, marketing, and sales at B2B tech companies, this book is a must-read.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “15 Daily Habits Highly Successful People Have”

“Every day, I dedicate a period of about 30 to 60 minutes when I turn off all electronics, and most of the time this aligns with my daily exercise. This daily digital detox allows my mind to wander to what really matters, eliminating any distractions from others. I use this time to check in with myself, set personal priorities and focus on important issues for both myself and my business. I’ve found that these small breaks give me a sense of peace and help me better navigate everyday business decisions.”
Jake Crandall, founder and owner of Oklahoma-based Okie CrossFit and Okie CrossFit Tahlequah who once weighed 300 pounds and has since helped 13 people lose more than 100 pounds and over 100 people lose more than 50 pounds.
“If you can’t see well, you can’t work well. Stay productive by giving your eyes a break throughout the day so they aren’t strained from focusing on your computer screen all day.”
Alex Maleki, VP of business development at tech incubator Idealab which has created more than 150 companies with more than 45 IPOs and acquisitions.
“A most important habit of success is the monitoring of daily nutrition. But by that, I am not talking about what successful people eat or drink. I am talking about what they feed themselves through what they, read, what they listen to, who they talk to and what they watch. In every day, the truly great ones I have had the chance to work with use a piece of that day to feed themselves something that will give them an inspirational advantage over those they’re competing against. Whether it is looking for inspirational quotes, watching videos of people offering lessons on excellence, or reading a chapter in a book that will help them in their journey, there is a piece of every day that is committed to growth.”
Adam Fingerman, cofounder and chief experience officer for ArcTouch, a San Francisco-based mobile app development company that has designed more than 400 custom apps for more than 150 clients, ranging from Fortune 500 companies to influential startups.
“It comes down to taking care of yourself-your body, mind and spirit. I have a regular exercise regimen. I start every day with a 40- to 50-minute workout: a combination of cardio, core strength and resistance training. During the day, you need to eat great food that fuels you without robbing energy, drink lots of water and stay hydrated. It’s amazing how much water your body needs during the day.”
Hunter Muller, president and CEO of HMG Strategy, LLC, an international network of more than 300,000 technology leaders, search executives, and technology partners which has hosted more than 70 live events in the U.S., Canada and Europe.

The orginal article.

Summary of “25 Of the Most Inspiring Books Everyone Should Read”

The Only Game in Town: Central Banks, Instability, and Avoiding the Next Collapse by Mohamed A. El-Erian “During my time on Wall Street, I witnessed both high and low times. If you want to understand the modern global economy, you should read this book. El-Erian is an incredibly clear thinker and explains complex ideas in an articulate way that is understandable to the financial novice while engaging to a seasoned industry veteran. Although no one can predict the future, this book comes close.”
A Tale of Three Kings by Gene Edwards “This masterfully written book highlights three leadership styles, culled from the lives of three kings mentioned in the Bible: Saul, David, and Absalom. Whether you are a seasoned business owner or a young entrepreneur, this book is a priceless treatise on the art of identifying and dealing with the good, the bad, and the ugly attitudes of those who sit in the big chair at the office.”
The Art of War by Sun Tzu “A very good friend of mine recently gave me a copy. It’s not a sit-down-and-read-it-in-one session type of book. But I was facing some challenging moments, and she left a copy on my desk with a note that said, ‘You need this.’ I opened a page randomly, and read, ‘Know yourself, and you will win all battles.’ It resonated immediately with me. Sometimes founding a company is like a war-you need discipline, a game plan, confidence, and to understand the enemy. I keep it on my desk for moments when I’m finding things tough. It’s not always relevant, but sometimes it’s a better pep talk than any inspirational Instagram post.”
The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement by Eliyahu Goldratt “This is a story about a business executive dealing with serious challenges at work and in his personal life. It is a good read as a novel, but more interestingly, it is a great business and leadership book. Its theme is that, in life and in business, you should constantly ask ‘What’s the goal?’ before taking any action when faced with a task or challenge. If you establish clear goals and a method of measurement, your action plan is more likely to line up with achieving the goal. The character, Herbie, becomes a metaphor for how to identify constraints and define processes based on these constraints.”
Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim “How to leverage, how to differentiate, and how to hedge-this classic business book inspires me on how to compete in the overcrowded optical and eyewear business. In today’s fast-changing environment, what used to be your strength and competitiveness can be your biggest obstacle in growth and change. One must constantly question, learn, and keep an open mind.”
American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company by Bryce G. Hoffman “This book really resonated with me, because it’s almost a mirror image of what we did with the Sparkling Ice brand. Hoffman dives into how Alan Mulally went into Ford and took a look at the organization as a whole. He shifted the focus to the consumer and recognized the importance of delivering quality products and services. Mulally honored the heritage of the company and used Ford’s identity as a strength to reinvigorate a culture. If you need to enact change in your company without losing its values, this book will be perfect to pull inspiration and tactics from.”
Double Your Profits in 6 Months or Less by Bob Fifer “This book was the most impactful on my career. Other than a small section on technology, the book is a blueprint for how an effective and efficient business should be run. Fifer’s teachings are ingrained in nearly all of TransPerfect’s business systems, and he has personally come and participated in training conferences with our senior management team.”
Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey Moore “I read this book when it was first published and I was a first-time CEO at Cobalt Networks. The book, which focuses on how to bridge the chasms that occur in the transition from a market solely for innovators and early adopters to one that reaches a mainstream audience, proved to be my personal manual for building disruptive companies. For those in management, marketing, and sales at B2B tech companies, this book is a must-read.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Productivity Hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70 to 80 percent of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Overcome Your Fear of Failure”

Behind many fears is worry about doing something wrong, looking foolish, or not meeting expectations – in other words, fear of failure.
Let’s go back to Alex as an example of how to execute this.
In coaching Alex through this approach, I encouraged him to redefine how he would view his performance in the interview.
Was there a way he might interpret it differently from the get-go and be more open to signs of success, even if they were small? Could he, for example, redefine failure as not being able to answer any of the questions posed or receiving specific negative feedback? Could he redefine success as being able to answer each question to the best of his ability and receiving no criticisms about how he interviewed?
Goals can be classified as approach goals or avoidance goals based on whether you are motivated by wanting to achieve a positive outcome or avoid an adverse one.
Though nervous about the process, Alex’s desire to become a CEO was an approach goal because it focused on what he wanted to achieve in his career rather than what he hoped to avoid.
If Alex had instead become discouraged about the outcome of his first C-level interview and decided to actively avoid the pain of rejection by never vying for the top spot again, he would have shifted from approach to avoidance mode.
To return to Alex, he was able to recognize through the coaching process that being hyper-focused on his previous company’s flop – and overestimating his role in it – caused him to panic about the CEO interview.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fastest Path to the CEO Job, According to a 10-Year Study”

We then took a closer look at “CEO sprinters” – those who reached the CEO role faster than the average of 24 years from their first job.
The catapults are so powerful that even people in our study who never aspired to become CEO ultimately landed the position by pursuing one or more of these strategies.
Go Small to Go Big The path to CEO rarely runs in a straight line; sometimes you have to move backward or sideways in order to get ahead. More than 60% of sprinters took a smaller role at some point in their career.
In other words, it’s great preparation for the CEO job.
She landed her first CEO role 20 years after day one in her first job.
While there is no single path to the CEO seat, these career catapults can be replicated by anyone who aspires to a leadership position, and could be especially powerful for those who may find it harder to get to the top.
Elena Lytkina Botelho is a partner at ghSMART, advising leading CEOs and boards, a coauthor of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller The CEO Next Door, and co-leader of the CEO Genome Project.
Kim Rosenkoetter Powell is a principal at ghSMART, a co-leader of the CEO Genome Project, and a co-author of The CEO Next Door..

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 CEOs share their favorite productivity hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70% to 80% of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tesla is what happens when you run a car company like a tech company”

The problem with running a car company like a software company is that people expect a car company to run like a car company!
Last Friday, when Tesla updated its pricing on the Model 3 Performance to include the Performance Upgrades Package for free, some Tesla owners were miffed.
Obviously, mores between car companies and tech companies differ, and as car companies start to behave more like tech companies, people like Lambert – the early adopters – are likely to find themselves in situations they didn’t anticipate.
What else could the car update? We’re pretty used to a car being, you know, a car, and nothing really changing unless we bring it into the shop.
With CEOs: most of us expect car company CEOs in the mode of Alfred Sloan, who invented the modern corporation as we understand it.
Musk doesn’t seem like he super cares about money qua money Musk doesn’t seem like he super cares about money qua money, but he does seem to care a lot about the businesses he’s built with that money.
He tends to use his money to boost his own companies; after all, he just spent $10 million on Tesla shares on Tuesday, and he plans to buy $20 million more.
He’s very jazzed about trucks, which suggests that the car industry is rubbing off on him.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Time-Management Hacks to Optimize Your Life In and Outside Work”

Time is everyone’s most valuable and scarce resource.
To really manage and maximize your time – to squeeze every opportunity out of it – you have to appreciate how much you have.
Time is either invested or wasted, so I don’t like white space on my calendar.
It’s playing with my kids, having a good time and making them laugh.
Every successful entrepreneur I’ve met has dedicated time in their life where they go all-in on their business.
As a CEO, I manage my time by being extremely aware of my profit-producing activities.
You need to be available at a time that works both for your clients and your team.
We all have personal lives, and it’s important to take time for yourself.

The orginal article.