Summary of “9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Productivity Hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70 to 80 percent of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Overcome Your Fear of Failure”

Behind many fears is worry about doing something wrong, looking foolish, or not meeting expectations – in other words, fear of failure.
Let’s go back to Alex as an example of how to execute this.
In coaching Alex through this approach, I encouraged him to redefine how he would view his performance in the interview.
Was there a way he might interpret it differently from the get-go and be more open to signs of success, even if they were small? Could he, for example, redefine failure as not being able to answer any of the questions posed or receiving specific negative feedback? Could he redefine success as being able to answer each question to the best of his ability and receiving no criticisms about how he interviewed?
Goals can be classified as approach goals or avoidance goals based on whether you are motivated by wanting to achieve a positive outcome or avoid an adverse one.
Though nervous about the process, Alex’s desire to become a CEO was an approach goal because it focused on what he wanted to achieve in his career rather than what he hoped to avoid.
If Alex had instead become discouraged about the outcome of his first C-level interview and decided to actively avoid the pain of rejection by never vying for the top spot again, he would have shifted from approach to avoidance mode.
To return to Alex, he was able to recognize through the coaching process that being hyper-focused on his previous company’s flop – and overestimating his role in it – caused him to panic about the CEO interview.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fastest Path to the CEO Job, According to a 10-Year Study”

We then took a closer look at “CEO sprinters” – those who reached the CEO role faster than the average of 24 years from their first job.
The catapults are so powerful that even people in our study who never aspired to become CEO ultimately landed the position by pursuing one or more of these strategies.
Go Small to Go Big The path to CEO rarely runs in a straight line; sometimes you have to move backward or sideways in order to get ahead. More than 60% of sprinters took a smaller role at some point in their career.
In other words, it’s great preparation for the CEO job.
She landed her first CEO role 20 years after day one in her first job.
While there is no single path to the CEO seat, these career catapults can be replicated by anyone who aspires to a leadership position, and could be especially powerful for those who may find it harder to get to the top.
Elena Lytkina Botelho is a partner at ghSMART, advising leading CEOs and boards, a coauthor of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller The CEO Next Door, and co-leader of the CEO Genome Project.
Kim Rosenkoetter Powell is a principal at ghSMART, a co-leader of the CEO Genome Project, and a co-author of The CEO Next Door..

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 CEOs share their favorite productivity hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70% to 80% of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tesla is what happens when you run a car company like a tech company”

The problem with running a car company like a software company is that people expect a car company to run like a car company!
Last Friday, when Tesla updated its pricing on the Model 3 Performance to include the Performance Upgrades Package for free, some Tesla owners were miffed.
Obviously, mores between car companies and tech companies differ, and as car companies start to behave more like tech companies, people like Lambert – the early adopters – are likely to find themselves in situations they didn’t anticipate.
What else could the car update? We’re pretty used to a car being, you know, a car, and nothing really changing unless we bring it into the shop.
With CEOs: most of us expect car company CEOs in the mode of Alfred Sloan, who invented the modern corporation as we understand it.
Musk doesn’t seem like he super cares about money qua money Musk doesn’t seem like he super cares about money qua money, but he does seem to care a lot about the businesses he’s built with that money.
He tends to use his money to boost his own companies; after all, he just spent $10 million on Tesla shares on Tuesday, and he plans to buy $20 million more.
He’s very jazzed about trucks, which suggests that the car industry is rubbing off on him.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Time-Management Hacks to Optimize Your Life In and Outside Work”

Time is everyone’s most valuable and scarce resource.
To really manage and maximize your time – to squeeze every opportunity out of it – you have to appreciate how much you have.
Time is either invested or wasted, so I don’t like white space on my calendar.
It’s playing with my kids, having a good time and making them laugh.
Every successful entrepreneur I’ve met has dedicated time in their life where they go all-in on their business.
As a CEO, I manage my time by being extremely aware of my profit-producing activities.
You need to be available at a time that works both for your clients and your team.
We all have personal lives, and it’s important to take time for yourself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why CEOs Devote So Much Time to Their Hobbies”

Does serious leisure make you a better leader? The few studies that have looked at the job performance of CEOs with strong hobbies show mixed results.
CEOs who are also pilots lead more innovative companies, and CEOs who run marathons show better company performance – but excessive CEO golfing may actually harm shareholder value.
We searched for public information on the hobbies of CEOs whose companies were in the S&P 500 index at the start of 2018.
To validate and enrich our findings from public sources, one of us conducted private interviews with 17 CEOs of S&P 500, Fortune 500, and similarly sized U.S. companies, asking about their hobbies – and if they had a serious leisure activity, what it meant to them and their ability to lead. In public and in private, CEOs state that their leisure interests help them cope with the ever-increasing demands of the top job.
Many CEOs opined that the complexity of the top job has increased dramatically, with diverse constituencies requiring their attention at any given time, and that they can never stop thinking about it, even in their free time.
While competitiveness certainly comes up as a motivation, for most of these CEOs it is truly about reaching one’s highest potential, a lesson they’ve transferred to leading.
CEOs used to be seen as all-powerful leaders who could singlehandedly change the direction and fate of their companies.
Wondering how you could possibly squeeze some room for serious leisure in between the solid blocks of your calendar? A recent HBR article showed that CEOs have, on average, about 2.1 hours a day for “Downtime,” meaning everything from simply relaxing to active hobbies, and even this time is probably highly fragmented during the day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Leader’s Calendar”

On top of that, the CEO must be the internal and external face of the organization through good times and bad. CEOs, of course, have a great deal of help and resources at their disposal.
A CEO’s schedule is a manifestation of how the leader leads and sends powerful messages to the rest of the organization.
In the study each CEO’s executive assistant was trained to code the CEO’s time in 15-minute increments, 24 hours a day and seven days a week, and to regularly verify that coding with the CEO. The resulting data set reveals where, how, and with whom the CEO spent his or her time and on what activities, topics, and tasks.
On the basis of these discussions and those with the hundreds of other CEOs in our workshops, we are convinced that every leader can improve his or her time management.
Finally, we will reflect on what our rich data reveals about the overall role of the CEO. A CEO has to simultaneously manage multiple dimensions of influence, which all contain dualities, or seeming contradictions, that effective CEOs must integrate.
Keeping time allocation aligned with CEOs’ top priorities is so crucial that we suggest that every quarter CEOs make a point of looking back at whether their schedule for the previous period adequately matched up with their personal agenda.
Should the CEO follow up with that person right away to make sure everything is OK? Should the CEO just wait and let the team member cool off? Sometimes emerging problems seem small at first but balloon into larger distractions if the CEO doesn’t attend to them.
Though the CEO’s presence can be important, overseeing and managing such work does not require the CEO and can be delegated to direct reports, for whom it is motivational and provides professional development opportunities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The trouble with charitable billionaires”

In the CEO society, the exercise of social responsibilities is no longer debated in terms of whether corporations should or shouldn’t be responsible for more than their own business interests.
The increasingly public role taken by CEOs is related to a renewed corporate focus on their wider social responsibility.
There is a further economic incentive for CEOs to avoid making fundamental changes to their operations in the name of social justice, in that a large portion of CEO remuneration often consists of company stock and options.
Charitable activity permits CEOs to be philanthropic rather than economically progressive or politically democratic.
The trumpeting of the CEOs’ personal generosity can grant an implicit right for their corporations to act ruthlessly and with little consideration for the broader social effects of their activities.
The hypocrisy revealed by CEOs claiming to be dedicated to social responsibility and charity also exposes a deeper authoritarian morality that prevails in the CEO society.
As the heads of these corporations, CEOs are now quasi-politicians.
One only has to think of the increasing power of the World Economic Forum, whose annual meeting in Davos in Switzerland sees corporate CEOs and senior politicians getting together with the ostensible goal of “Improving the world”, a now time-honoured ritual that symbolises the global power and agency of CEOs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Steve Jobs’ Secret for Eliciting Questions, Overheard at a San Francisco Cafe”

Last month, I was enjoying the remarkably good crab cake and poached eggs at Just for You CafĂ© in San Francisco’s Dogpatch neighborhood, when I overheard a mentoring session taking place at the next table.
I recognized the mentor as the famous, fifty-something ex-CEO of a household-brand Internet company; the mentee, I pieced together, was the twenty-something CEO of an app on my phone that had raised over $70 million in VC cash.
“My leadership team just gave me anonymous feedback,” Young CEO told Famous CEO. “One thing they said was that I’m not open to being questioned.”
“After every conversation with my team and every all-hands, I always ask if there are any questions or concerns.”
“Maybe I should hold office hours where people can raise concerns privately?”.
By this point, the mentee wasn’t the only one interested in the answer.
In my work with CEOs and executive teams around strategic narrative, I often have a similar need-as anyone does who leads groups-to quickly take the pulse in the room.
“Because I’m going to tell you what Steve Jobs did, which was related to me by the late Bill Campbell.”

The orginal article.