Summary of “The New Language of Climate Change”

PHOENIX-Leading climate scientists and meteorologists are banking on a new strategy for talking about climate change: take the politics out of it.
Educating the public and policy makers about climate change at a time when elected leaders are doubling down on denials it is happening at all or that humans are responsible for it demands a new lexicon, conference attendees told me-one that can effectively narrate the overwhelming scientific evidence but not get sucked into the controversy fueled most prominently by President Donald Trump.
The hope is to convince the small but powerful minority that stands in the way of new policies to help mitigate climate change’s worst long-term effects-as well as the people who vote for them-that something needs to be done or their own livelihoods and health will be at stake.
Climate Matters is tracking climate trends in 244 cities-including a steadily hotter Phoenix.
Simpson attended the conference at the Phoenix Convention Center to outline his three-year effort to educate farmers about climate change in western Tennessee and eastern Kentucky, where at some dinner tables the term remains a political curse word.
Despite the Democratic takeover of the House, and a new commitment to try to pass climate change legislation, some leading Republican skeptics are still chairing major committees with jurisdiction over climate policy.
Now, some 600 broadcast meteorologists, out of an estimated 2,200 in the United States, are working with Climate Matters, founded in 2010, to craft new ways to communicate climate change to their viewers.
Gandy, who helped found Climate Matters, recounted a recent presentation he delivered at the Rotary Club in Columbia on the dangers of climate change and the need to take sweeping actions soon to confront it.

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Summary of “What Happens When You Drink a Gallon of Water a Day?”

In an effort to overcompensate my way to better life habits, I decided to slosh through a feat known across the internet as the Water Gallon Challenge: drinking a gallon per day for a month, with the promise of glowing skin and a lot more energy.
Day 5: Yes! Water is life! I no longer hobble into my day with my feet and spine curled up like dry leaves.
Day 7: Can we talk about how good I am at yoga right now? My hamstrings are much more flexible, and my back bends with ease.
Day 10: A switch to water that’s been ultrapurified by reverse osmosis has proved revelatory.
Day 14: I crave water first thing in the morning instead of coffee.
Day 19: The peeing has decreased to ten times per day.
Day 32: Oops, the month is over and I didn’t even notice-hydration is routine, and I’m loving it.
How much: “Proper hydration means 85 ounces of water a day from food and beverages, plus more to replenish what you lose when exercising.”

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Summary of “If you want to tackle big problems, try thinking like a bee |”

So you’ve woken up and decided you’re finally going to take on the big, big problem that’s been weighing on you – perhaps it’s shoring up your public libraries, helping homeless dogs and cats, or fighting climate change.
Maybe it’s time to look elsewhere for inspiration – like the humble honey bee.
They can show us that thinking small may be the best way to think big, according to beekeeper Marianne Gee, who lives in Ottawa, Canada.
The lifespan of a worker bee ranges from six weeks to twenty weeks.
Most of her brief existence is spent gathering nectar to make honey.
According to Gee, “a bee in her lifetime makes only 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey” – a tiny fraction of the hundred pounds of honey that a typical colony needs to survive.
A bee won’t directly benefit from the honey she makes; instead, it will allow future generations to thrive after she is gone.
Gee herself was distressed by the pesticides and diseases that were harming the world’s honey bees and ruminated about what she and her husband could possibly do to fix the ailing agricultural system.

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Summary of “The day I tasted climate change”

Climate change doesn’t ignite wildfires, but it’s intensifying the hot, dry summer conditions that have helped fuel some of California’s deadliest and most destructive fires in recent years.
At the rate we’re going, it could take hundreds of years to shift to a global energy system that doesn’t pump out far more climate pollution-every ton of which only makes the problem worse.
President Barack Obama’s top science advisor, John Holdren, once said that our options for dealing with climate change are cutting emissions, adapting, and suffering.
The devastation from climate change will manifest in different ways in different places, in highly uneven and unfair ways: severe drought and famine across much of Africa and Australia, shrinking water supplies for the billions who rely on the glaciers of the Tibetan Plateau, and the threat of forced displacement for at least tens of millions exposed to rising sea levels in South Asia.
Research has found that experiencing higher temperatures and extreme weather events is correlated with greater belief in or concern about climate change.
Younger people, who are staring at a much grimmer future, are considerably more likely to believe that climate change is real and action is required-even among millennial Republicans in the US. Overwhelmed.
Put another way, one paradoxical impact of climate change is that it could make many even more reluctant to take it on.
When I started writing seriously about climate change a little more than five years ago, the dangers largely seemed distant and abstract.

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Summary of “The Marshall Islands: A nation that fears it’s on the brink of extinction”

The Marshall Islands, a tiny nation of islands and atolls located between Hawaii and Australia, are in a fight for survival.
In a battle between man and nature, officials say climate change is threatening the islands’ existence.
The government of the Marshall Islands has had one of the loudest voices on the world’s stage with regard to climate change.
” came to be really our last hope to galvanize the entire global community to say, ‘OK enough is enough,'” The islands’ Minister of Environment David Paul said.
The island of Eneko is among other smaller islands on the outer edge of Majuro’s lagoon.
Paul pointed out that the island has had a significant amount of land turned to beach.
Over a third of the population has already left, seeking opportunity in the U.S. Soon, the more than 70,000 left behind may have no other choice than to also flee to the U.S. In June 2017, President Donald Trump delivered another crushing blow to the islands with the announcement that the U.S. will withdraw from the Paris climate accord.
In combating climate change, “We always say this: we may go first, but you’re next,” Paul said, referring to the fact that the rest of the world should take the island nation’s concerns seriously.

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Summary of “The Most Important Thinking Habit Nobody Taught You”

Elastic thinking allows us to shift gears and think about something in more than one way.
To survive in an environment of constant stimulation and rapid change, elastic thinking is essential.
Elastic thinking is about stretching your mind and using ‘bottom up’ processing in the brain rather than the top down executive functions that drive analytical thinking.
Elastic thinking, in combination with rational or logical thought, and creative thinking will make you indispensable.
Elastic thinking endows us with the ability to solve novel problems and overcome the neural barriers that can impede us from looking beyond the status quo.
Elastic thinking is what you need when the circumstances change and you are dealing with something new.
It’s not about following rules,” says Leonard Mlodinow, theoretical physicist, author of “Elastic: Flexible Thinking in a Time of Change.
How to develop an agile mindThe good news is flexible thinking skills can be taught.

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Summary of “‘We are in trouble.’ Global carbon emissions reached a record high in 2018.”

Global emissions of carbon dioxide are reaching the highest levels on record, scientists projected Wednesday, in the latest evidence of the chasm between international goals for combating climate change and what countries are doing.
The expected increase, which would bring fossil fuel and industrial emissions to a record high of 37.1 billion tons of carbon dioxide per year, is being driven by a nearly 5 percent growth of emissions in China and more than 6 percent in India, researchers estimated, along with growth in many other nations.
“We are in trouble. We are in deep trouble with climate change,” United Nations Secretary General António Guterres said this week at the opening of the 24th annual U.N. climate conference, where countries will wrestle with the ambitious goals they need to meet to sharply reduce carbon emissions in the coming years.
Scientists have said that annual carbon dioxide emissions need to plunge almost by half by 2030 if the world wants to hit the most stringent – and safest – climate change target.
There’s little doubt that 2018 hit a record high for global emissions.
In the United States, emissions in 2018 are projected to have risen 2.5 percent, driven in part by a very warm summer that led to high air conditioning use and a very cold winter in the Northeast, but also by a continued use of oil driven by low gas prices and bigger cars.
Thanks to increased investment in green energy, China’s carbon intensity, or the amount of carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP, declined by 46 percent by 2017 from 2005 levels, the Ministry of Ecology and Environment reported earlier this week.
“With these goals met, a very solid foundation has been laid for meeting the target of halting the increase of carbon dioxide emissions by 2030, and even accomplishing that sooner than planned,” Xie Zhenhua, China’s special representative for climate change affairs, told the state-owned news agency Xinhua ahead of the meeting in Poland.

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Summary of “The New York Review of Books”

It is no wonder that the planet’s carbon emissions, which had seemed to plateau in mid-decade, are again on the rise: preliminary figures indicate that a new record will be set in 2018.This is the backdrop against which the IPCC report arrives, written by ninety-one scientists from forty countries.
The burden of climate change falls first and heaviest on the poorest nations, who of course have done the least to cause the crisis.
The report provides few truly new insights for those who have been paying attention to the issue.
As the new report concedes, there is “No documented historical precedent” for change at the speed that the science requires.
Since the last IPCC report, a series of newspaper exposés has made it clear that the big oil companies knew all about climate change even before it became a public issue in the late 1980s, and that, instead of owning up to that knowledge, they sponsored an enormously expensive campaign to obfuscate the science.
The next Democratic primary season might allow a real climate champion to emerge who would back what the rising progressive star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called a “Green New Deal”; in turn a revitalized America could theoretically help lead the planet back to sanity.
In October, the attorney general for New York State filed suit against ExxonMobil, claiming the company defrauded shareholders by downplaying the risks of climate change.
If we keep doing that, climate change will no longer be a problem, because calling something a problem implies there’s still a solution.

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Summary of “Should we really all fly less?”

So we don’t need to ask whether climate change is happening – or whether humans are causing it.
Of course, it’s true that climate change won’t be solved by your buying or driving habits alone – although many experts agree these are important, and can influence others to make changes too.
“Everyone is going to have to be involved,” says Debra Robert, co-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the group tasked with the report.
One 2017 study co-authored by Lund University’s Nicholas ranked 148 individual actions on climate change according to their impact.
After fossil fuels, the food industry – and in particular the meat and dairy sector – is one of the most important contributors to climate change.
Nicholas’s study concluded that having fewer children is the best way to reduce your contribution to climate change, with almost 60 tonnes of CO2 avoided per year.
We could ask if having children is necessarily a bad thing for solving climate change: our challenges may mean we will need more problem-solvers in future generations, not fewer.
Diego Arguedas Ortiz is a science and climate change reporter for BBC Future.

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Summary of “Using Wi-Fi to “see” behind closed doors is easier than anyone thought”

This kind of set-up is just too basic to reveal any useful detail about what goes on behind closed doors, other than the presence of the Wi-Fi network itself.
These guys have found a way to see through walls using ambient Wi-Fi signals and an ordinary smartphone.
“Bad actors using smartphones can localize and track individuals in their home or office from outside walls, by leveraging reflections of ambient Wi-Fi transmissions,” they say.
If humans were able to see the world as Wi-Fi does, it would seem a bizarre landscape.
Doors and walls would be almost transparent, and almost every house and office would be illuminated from within by a bright light bulb-a Wi-Fi transmitter.
This crazy Wi-Fi vision would clearly reveal whether anybody was behind a wall and, if so, whether the person was moving.
Provided nothing moves inside the target building, the Wi-Fi signal will be constant.
The team go on to say that they have tested this approach using Nexus 5 and Nexus 6 Android smartphones to peer into 11 different offices and apartments that the team had permission to observe, many of which contained several Wi-Fi transmitters.

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