Summary of “How Humans Could Halt Climate Change By 2050”

Last year, the world’s climate scientists put out a report showing what it will take to limit global warming to 1.5 °C by the end of this century, averting the worst consequences of climate change.
Sally Benson, director of the Climate and Energy Project at Stanford, is so ready to take the leap and imagine this zero-carbon world 2050, it’s a little startling.
Different guides to this 2050 world show me slightly different things.
“You know, it’s like a historical artifact, but you know, they find it very touching. They are appreciative, because they’re living in a world where they don’t need to worry about climate change anymore.”
Years ago, he wrote a big report on cities and climate change for the World Bank.
We’re looking at an essential part of a world without climate change.
In a world without climate change, this is what cattle grazing looks like, all over the tropics.
It’s 2050 and there are almost ten billion people in the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are we on the road to civilisation collapse?”

Collapse may be a normal phenomenon for civilisations, regardless of their size and technological stage.
So collapse may be a normal phenomenon for civilisations, regardless of their size and stage.
While our scale may now be global, collapse appears to happen to both sprawling empires and fledgling kingdoms alike.
The collapse of the Anasazi, the Tiwanaku civilisation, the Akkadians, the Mayan, the Roman Empire, and many others have all coincided with abrupt climatic changes, usually droughts.
COMPLEXITY: Collapse expert and historian Joseph Tainter has proposed that societies eventually collapse under the weight of their own accumulated complexity and bureaucracy.
RANDOMNESS/BAD LUCK: Statistical analysis on empires suggests that collapse is random and independent of age.
Despite the abundance of books and articles, we don’t have a conclusive explanation as to why civilisations collapse.
In theory, a civilisation might be less vulnerable to collapse if new technologies can mitigate against pressures such as climate change.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Quickest ‘Hack’ To Happiness”

We give random people on the street judgmental looks.
You know what the real hack is? When you’re grateful, you don’t only feel better, you also get a better life.
You will only surround yourself with a bunch of other ungrateful people.
“What if people in my life are ungrateful?”.
Don’t try to convince them because people never listen.
It’s much better to find people who share the same values as you.
Treat every meal you eat like the best meal that you’ve ever had. Appreciate the people in your life.
For some people, it’s never good enough-no matter what they do or have.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Orchestrate Change from the Bottom Up”

PCMH requires primary-care doctors to change their daily work practices by moving from reactive care to prevention and by using evidence-based guidelines to treat patients with chronic illnesses like diabetes.
I observed them as they engaged in activities such as “Huddling,” where doctors and medical assistants discussed the conditions and progress of patients coming in for office visits that day, and strategic planning meetings, in which managers, doctors, and medical assistants talked about how to best implement the reforms.
From an analysis of the data, I was able to identify the most significant factor: On the teams that were most successful, managers had enlisted the aid of medical assistants to help change the doctors’ behaviors.
Third, the medical assistants were central in the doctors’ peer network, enabling them to spread the word about those doctors who had adopted the new practices.
In the script, medical assistants would pose the change as something a doctor could do as a favor to them as opposed to being a policy imposed by management.
As one medical assistant recalled, “I told [doctor] that when patients are on the list, I need to keep managing them, and that takes time. Finally, she said she would do the to get those patients off the list for me.” In other words, the doctors viewed themselves as helping the medical assistants and, as one doctor noted, “We want to keep the MAs happy because we depend on them.” Doctors were willing to make changes to help their MAs, as long as these decisions did not run counter to their clinical judgment.
Importantly, the managers at the successful hospital freed up time for their MAs to engage in the new work associated with influencing the doctors.
While my study investigated two hospitals that were trying to change the work practices of its doctors, I believe the idea of leveraging the structural power of low level workers to push change from the bottom up has broader implications, especially for other organizations employing professionals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Language of Climate Change”

PHOENIX-Leading climate scientists and meteorologists are banking on a new strategy for talking about climate change: take the politics out of it.
Educating the public and policy makers about climate change at a time when elected leaders are doubling down on denials it is happening at all or that humans are responsible for it demands a new lexicon, conference attendees told me-one that can effectively narrate the overwhelming scientific evidence but not get sucked into the controversy fueled most prominently by President Donald Trump.
The hope is to convince the small but powerful minority that stands in the way of new policies to help mitigate climate change’s worst long-term effects-as well as the people who vote for them-that something needs to be done or their own livelihoods and health will be at stake.
Climate Matters is tracking climate trends in 244 cities-including a steadily hotter Phoenix.
Simpson attended the conference at the Phoenix Convention Center to outline his three-year effort to educate farmers about climate change in western Tennessee and eastern Kentucky, where at some dinner tables the term remains a political curse word.
Despite the Democratic takeover of the House, and a new commitment to try to pass climate change legislation, some leading Republican skeptics are still chairing major committees with jurisdiction over climate policy.
Now, some 600 broadcast meteorologists, out of an estimated 2,200 in the United States, are working with Climate Matters, founded in 2010, to craft new ways to communicate climate change to their viewers.
Gandy, who helped found Climate Matters, recounted a recent presentation he delivered at the Rotary Club in Columbia on the dangers of climate change and the need to take sweeping actions soon to confront it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happens When You Drink a Gallon of Water a Day?”

In an effort to overcompensate my way to better life habits, I decided to slosh through a feat known across the internet as the Water Gallon Challenge: drinking a gallon per day for a month, with the promise of glowing skin and a lot more energy.
Day 5: Yes! Water is life! I no longer hobble into my day with my feet and spine curled up like dry leaves.
Day 7: Can we talk about how good I am at yoga right now? My hamstrings are much more flexible, and my back bends with ease.
Day 10: A switch to water that’s been ultrapurified by reverse osmosis has proved revelatory.
Day 14: I crave water first thing in the morning instead of coffee.
Day 19: The peeing has decreased to ten times per day.
Day 32: Oops, the month is over and I didn’t even notice-hydration is routine, and I’m loving it.
How much: “Proper hydration means 85 ounces of water a day from food and beverages, plus more to replenish what you lose when exercising.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “If you want to tackle big problems, try thinking like a bee |”

So you’ve woken up and decided you’re finally going to take on the big, big problem that’s been weighing on you – perhaps it’s shoring up your public libraries, helping homeless dogs and cats, or fighting climate change.
Maybe it’s time to look elsewhere for inspiration – like the humble honey bee.
They can show us that thinking small may be the best way to think big, according to beekeeper Marianne Gee, who lives in Ottawa, Canada.
The lifespan of a worker bee ranges from six weeks to twenty weeks.
Most of her brief existence is spent gathering nectar to make honey.
According to Gee, “a bee in her lifetime makes only 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey” – a tiny fraction of the hundred pounds of honey that a typical colony needs to survive.
A bee won’t directly benefit from the honey she makes; instead, it will allow future generations to thrive after she is gone.
Gee herself was distressed by the pesticides and diseases that were harming the world’s honey bees and ruminated about what she and her husband could possibly do to fix the ailing agricultural system.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The day I tasted climate change”

Climate change doesn’t ignite wildfires, but it’s intensifying the hot, dry summer conditions that have helped fuel some of California’s deadliest and most destructive fires in recent years.
At the rate we’re going, it could take hundreds of years to shift to a global energy system that doesn’t pump out far more climate pollution-every ton of which only makes the problem worse.
President Barack Obama’s top science advisor, John Holdren, once said that our options for dealing with climate change are cutting emissions, adapting, and suffering.
The devastation from climate change will manifest in different ways in different places, in highly uneven and unfair ways: severe drought and famine across much of Africa and Australia, shrinking water supplies for the billions who rely on the glaciers of the Tibetan Plateau, and the threat of forced displacement for at least tens of millions exposed to rising sea levels in South Asia.
Research has found that experiencing higher temperatures and extreme weather events is correlated with greater belief in or concern about climate change.
Younger people, who are staring at a much grimmer future, are considerably more likely to believe that climate change is real and action is required-even among millennial Republicans in the US. Overwhelmed.
Put another way, one paradoxical impact of climate change is that it could make many even more reluctant to take it on.
When I started writing seriously about climate change a little more than five years ago, the dangers largely seemed distant and abstract.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Marshall Islands: A nation that fears it’s on the brink of extinction”

The Marshall Islands, a tiny nation of islands and atolls located between Hawaii and Australia, are in a fight for survival.
In a battle between man and nature, officials say climate change is threatening the islands’ existence.
The government of the Marshall Islands has had one of the loudest voices on the world’s stage with regard to climate change.
” came to be really our last hope to galvanize the entire global community to say, ‘OK enough is enough,'” The islands’ Minister of Environment David Paul said.
The island of Eneko is among other smaller islands on the outer edge of Majuro’s lagoon.
Paul pointed out that the island has had a significant amount of land turned to beach.
Over a third of the population has already left, seeking opportunity in the U.S. Soon, the more than 70,000 left behind may have no other choice than to also flee to the U.S. In June 2017, President Donald Trump delivered another crushing blow to the islands with the announcement that the U.S. will withdraw from the Paris climate accord.
In combating climate change, “We always say this: we may go first, but you’re next,” Paul said, referring to the fact that the rest of the world should take the island nation’s concerns seriously.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Important Thinking Habit Nobody Taught You”

Elastic thinking allows us to shift gears and think about something in more than one way.
To survive in an environment of constant stimulation and rapid change, elastic thinking is essential.
Elastic thinking is about stretching your mind and using ‘bottom up’ processing in the brain rather than the top down executive functions that drive analytical thinking.
Elastic thinking, in combination with rational or logical thought, and creative thinking will make you indispensable.
Elastic thinking endows us with the ability to solve novel problems and overcome the neural barriers that can impede us from looking beyond the status quo.
Elastic thinking is what you need when the circumstances change and you are dealing with something new.
It’s not about following rules,” says Leonard Mlodinow, theoretical physicist, author of “Elastic: Flexible Thinking in a Time of Change.
How to develop an agile mindThe good news is flexible thinking skills can be taught.

The orginal article.