Summary of “You’re Doing It Wrong: 3 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Phone’s Battery « Smartphones :: Gadget Hacks”

From talking to individual respondents, it appears many people were like me and confused about which charging habits are actually bad for your battery.
As a result, it exacerbates many bad habits regarding poor battery mismanagement.
Often with my laptop, I would watch videos and do homework late into the night, eking out what little battery I had left to accomplish whatever task I had. Afterward, I would plug it into the charger and go to sleep for the night to wake up to a full charge – but I never stopped to think about what happens to the battery overnight after it hits 100%. Even back then, without fast charging, it didn’t take eight hours to fully charge a battery.
At 77°F, the battery capacity reduced by 20%, meaning the maximum amount of energy the battery could store was now 80% of its original capacity.
To restore your capacity, you’d need to fully discharge your battery so that your battery would remember its full capacity.
Depth of discharge is the difference between the starting battery percentage and ending battery percentage, which determines the number of discharge cycles your battery has.
Most of us have at least 30 minutes to spare while getting ready, and by that time, fast charging should have your battery up to at least 50%. Depending on the battery percentage when you began charging, 30 minutes could give you an all-day charge.
Instead of 100% capacity, electric vehicles charge only to 80% and deplete to only 30%. This way, every electric vehicle lives its entire life in the sweet zone, and when the battery capacity begins to reduce, the system slowly increases the depth of discharge to maintain the same battery life while preserving the battery.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a rock star of Iranian digital activism built a culture of misogyny and fear”

ASL19 founder Ali Karimzadeh Bangi, one of the leading lights of the expat Iranian digital rights community, appeared in court on charges of sexual assault and forcible imprisonment.
For years, Bangi had been the public face of the Iran Cyber Dialogue Conference, a major conference dedicated to digital freedom and the promotion of human rights in Iran.
It’s still unclear how often that behavior bordered on assault, but even where it stopped short, employees say Bangi fostered a hostile and sometimes even abusive workplace.
Bangi’s connections at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs gave him an early line on government-funded projects like the multimillion-dollar Digital Public Square initiative, which funded digital tools for political opposition groups around the world.
A fixture at conferences and digital rights events, Bangi was charismatic, generous with his time, and eager to connect people in the community.
Former employees say that the rock star attitude came with an aggressive and unpredictable streak.
“Immediately upon learning about the court appearance, we met with Mr. Bangi about the accusations which gave rise to the charge,” the statement read. “At the conclusion of that meeting, Mr. Bangi resigned from ASL19.” The statement was signed by Anna May and Fereidoon Bashar, who took over directorship of the company.
Reached by The Verge, Feri and Anna referred us to a recent statement on the company blog, reflecting on Bangi’s departure and announcing a new partnership with a group called Coda Societies to improve company culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you shouldn’t charge your phone in your car”

The INSIDER Summary: Turns out, charging your phone in your car could do more harm than good.
Plugging your phone into a car’s USB port could stall the charging and even damage the charger.
The best thing to do is to get home to charge your phone at an outlet.
Why? For starters, the USB port in your vehicle probably provides less electricity than your phone really needs to charge.
By plugging your phone into a low-power USB port like the one in your car, you allow the device to swallow up power at a rate that’s much too fast for the port’s capabilities.
As a result, your phone might stall while it charges, or worse – barely charge at all.
While the extent of the damage depends on the type of phone you have and its battery, the odds are high that your device is depleting your car’s battery as it charges.
If your car is an older model, you might want to avoid charging your phone through its USB port.

The orginal article.