Summary of “America Soured on My Multiracial Family”

Amid the stories of adoption in America is the story of my family-the story of my youngest daughter.
The first comes from the Book of James, and defines “Pure” religious practice in part as looking after “Widows and orphans in their distress.” The second, from the Book of Galatians, declares an eternal truth: “There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” As a result, my wife and I not only felt called to adopt, but we believed that race was no barrier to unity for a family of genuine faith.
From the instant we saw her, we loved her with our whole hearts, but any adoptive family can tell you that love does not heal all hurts.
Claims of cultural imperialism, wounded national pride, and rare, sad horror stories of exploitation or abuse soured foreign nations against American families.
The attacks on our family came less and less from the left, and increasingly from the alt-right-a vicious movement of Trump-supporting white nationalists who loathe multiracial families.
Not every adopted family has been audited by their government, attacked online from left and right, and seen their child threatened by racists.
No one should believe that our experience is the experience of every adoptive family.
The hate our family received may have been more prolific because of who we are, but that hate is real, it is part of American life, and it will find its way to all too many families that looks like ours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Norway’s hidden scandal”

The family says Leen was never physically punished – and they believe the allegation of violence was taken particularly seriously because they were immigrants to Norway.
One journalist has calculated that children with a foreign mother are four times more likely than other children in Norway to be forcibly taken from their families.
Reidar Hjermann, the former Children’s Ombudsman, says no-one should be judged to be violent without evidence.
He also says: “When a family comes to Norway with a mother and father who have themselves been brought up with violence, then I think we should assume that we need to go to help this family to understand that where they come from, physical punishment is rather common, but in Norway it is absolutely forbidden.”
Katrin Koch, the head of the Child Expert Commission which the disgraced psychiatrist was a member of, says one reason for the disproportionately high number of immigrant families affected by care orders might be that Norway is “Quite a conformist country in many ways.”
“Another point would be that Norway is a rich country – and the richer you are, the less consideration you have to give to survival issues, and the more consideration you can give to an optimalisation of how children are to be raised.”
The Ministry of Children says it’s bringing in legal changes that will strengthen children’s and family rights.
“I’m at a loss for words, for the outrage,” she says, “Knowing other parents who have had lesser allegations and have lost children.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Little mean girls: Helping your daughter swim in those choppy social waters”

The girls in my daughter’s class began to divide themselves into groups.
I figured my daughter would eventually stumble into mean-girl territory, and that subversive manipulation, social rejection and alliance-building would leave her occasionally on the curb.
According to Katie Hurley, author of “No More Mean Girls: The Secret to Raising Strong, Confident, and Compassionate Girls,” research shows that severe bullying in childhood puts adolescents at a higher risk of mental-health issues, including suicidal thoughts and behaviors, debilitating depressive symptoms, and anxiety.
The most common ways girls ages 8 to 12 bully is by mocking, teasing and calling people names, says Cosette Taillac, a child and adolescent therapist and the national strategic leader for mental health and wellness at Kaiser Permanente.
What if your daughter isn’t talking about specifics, yet you suspect something is wrong?
Encourage your daughter to turn to a trusted friend for support, Bagwell says.
“By participating in activities such as a team sport, music groups or social clubs, your daughter will develop new abilities and social skills, and learn what is appropriate and inappropriate behavior and soon learn to surround themselves with positive influences,” says Armin.
Even if your daughter hasn’t confronted a mean-girl situation, regularly talking with her can lay groundwork if a crisis arises.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Middle Child Is Going Extinct”

You’re no doubt planning to attend your local Middle Child Day parade, or take in a lecture on Famous Middle Children Throughout History, or perhaps treat your own middle child to a special Middle Child’s dinner, then come home and cut your Happy Middle Child Day cake into several perfectly equal pieces, then crack open a bottle of Middle Sister wine to celebrate.
So here’s a suggestion as to how you can spend the next National Middle Child Day: contemplating the extinction of the middle child.
As one middle child said to me, “There is a thing called Middle Child Syndrome. There’s no Oldest Child Syndrome or Youngest Child Syndrome. We’re the only ones with a syndrome.” Yet if you give credence to the concept of birth-order attributes – the idea that where you are born among your siblings leaves an indelible mark on your personality – then you must now contemplate a world in which an entire subspecies is about to disappear, for generations to come.
If the middle child is a natural peacemaker, can’t we all use a little more peace? “What few people realize is that middle children are actually more likely to successfully effect change in the world than any other birth order,” says psychologist Catherine Salmon, a leading expert on middle children.
For every admirable middle child in world history, there’s a classic famous middle who seems to embody a middle child’s insatiable need for attention and affirmation.
If not even middles enjoy being middles, should it matter if middles disappear? I posed this question to Bruce Hopman, a classic middle child and the father of a classic middle child.
“Kesha: middle child. Nicki Minaj: middle child. Also a middle child: Don King.” He cites these celebrities in support of his theory that, if nothing else, “Middle children have distinguished themselves by mastering the art of doing funny things to get attention with their hair.” He sees Joey Chestnut, the world-champion hot-dog eater, as another archetypal middle child: “I know; I’ll shove as many hot dogs in my mouth at once. That will get Mom’s attention!”.
“If anyone’s going to write to me about that book,” she says now, “It’s going to be a middle child who’s thought a lot about their middleness and its effect on their lives.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Essential Personal Finance Skills to Teach Your Kid Before They Move Out”

Your child is on the verge of moving out and living on their own.
Consider these ways that you can help your child build a base of financial knowledge before they move out.
Once your child understands how bank interest rates work, they’ll need to know about the tendency banks have to charge fees to account holders.
Tell your child how they can avoid these fees by researching the best bank accounts and reading the fine print.
Show your child that credit card interest rates can be exorbitant, and that high balances can lead to a debt spiral from which they may never escape.
If your child needs to purchase a refrigerator for their apartment, convey to them that they should seek out the best quality model at a price that fits their budget.
Shopping for value is a skill that can be learned, and one that could save your child a considerable amount of money over time.
You don’t need to teach your child how to replace a catalytic converter, but it helps if they have a decent foundation of car knowledge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is the Age of Grandparents”

Even while grandparents offer stability and consistency to children whose previous lives might have been chaotic, grandfamilies suffer from a particular kind of precariousness.
For a variety of reasons, most grandparents are not licensed foster-care providers, don’t have custody or guardianship of their grandchildren, and thus don’t have legal standing to make decisions regarding the children’s schooling, medical care, or vacation plans.
Why go through all the red tape to make it a legal relationship when these children are already family? Why invite child-welfare caseworkers and judges to monitor what’s taking place in your own home? Grandparents might balk at licensing because it means giving the child over to the legal custody of the state.
Becoming a licensed foster parent might not even be an option for everyone, Beltran said, since to be eligible for licensing, the grandchild must have come to the grandparent’s home by way of a child-welfare agency.
The majority of grandparents raising grandchildren are left to make their way through trial and error, cobbling together financial and logistical support for the grandchildren as best they can.
One way some grandparents avoid this sense of precariousness is through a program called assisted guardianship.
Created by the Fostering Connections Act of 2008, which gives all states and some Native American tribes the option to use federal child-welfare money for this purpose, assisted guardianship is a way for licensed foster grandparents to exit the foster system.
As a result, assisted guardianships cost the state much less than non-relative foster care-$10,000 a year per child, compared to $60,000 per year for foster care, according to Beltran-and the grandparents with this arrangement have legal authority to act in their grandchild’s best interest without a case worker checking in.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is your kid grumpy, stubborn or defiant? This might be the reason”

One mother’s investigation into why her child was acting so stubborn led to a surprising discovery: He was discouraged.
The root of an at-times defiant, difficult child: discouragementRudolf Dreikurs, a 20th century psychologist who focused much of his work on parenting, observed that, “A misbehaving child is a discouraged child.”
Sometimes a child who is misbehaving frequently is struggling with discouragement, 20th century psychologist Rudolf Dreikurs found.
After struggling to understand why her very smart child refused to do his homework, one mom finally asks the right question.
This is one of the hardest places to pull a kid out of because the child’s behavior makes adults feel the same emotions that the child is feeling: hopeless, helpless, and inadequate.
These uncomfortable emotions are frequently masked by the child with defiance and lack of motivation.
Tips for encouraging your child, combating defiant behaviorPulling our child out of this hole takes creativity and patience.
Break a task down into small steps and ask your child to just do one step at a time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hollywood Wanted An Edgy Child Actor. When He Spiraled, They Couldn’t Help.”

It had been years since Renfro had delivered a performance that caught the public’s attention, and at the time, he was treated as yet another addition to the mournful legacy of former child stars – Dana Plato, River Phoenix, Judy Garland – whose lives collapsed from Hollywood darling to death by overdose.
Renfro became an overnight star because he was a rowdy kid with natural talent who stood apart from more seasoned child actors.
10 years after Renfro’s death, interviews with Renfro’s former colleagues make plain that the mechanisms in place to protect child actors – mechanisms compromised by conflicts of interest and a dependence on parents and guardians – were scarcely capable of protecting kids like Renfro, and largely remain so today.
Renfro’s parents divorced when he was 5; his mother remarried and moved to Michigan, and Renfro’s paternal grandmother, Joanne Renfro, became the primary caregiver for an increasingly wayward child.
None of the adults who worked with Renfro as a child who spoke with BuzzFeed News said they suspected Renfro might be addicted to a drug like heroin.
With no boundaries off the set, Renfro kept getting pushed past perceived limits for child actors on the set, as well.
Instead, throughout the ’90s and Renfro’s early adolescence, Hollywood kept courting the child actor, trading on his name and fandom.
If the parent or guardian is checked out, and their child’s darker facets are what keeps them employed, it’s not in any way surprising that an actor like Renfro would slip through a system so ill-equipped to save him anyway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Helping Kids With A.D.H.D., and Their Families, Thrive”

“People don’t truly understand what A.D.H.D. is and why a kid who’s bright can’t just grit his teeth and get it done,” Dr. Carlson said.
Sometimes just understanding different aspects of A.D.H.D. – that the child has executive function issues and needs help planning, or that the child cannot control his emotions and needs help with anger management – helps the parent cope.
Often, the kids are really trying, Dr. Carlson said.
So the kids need help, and successfully treating A.D.H.D. has multiple components.
Dr. Bertin said, A.D.H.D. itself makes all those interventions much more stressful for everyone, and “when parents are feeling swamped and overwhelmed it’s really hard to do a lot of things that are recommended in taking care of A.D.H.D.”.
Parents have to take care of themselves, and pay attention to the family dynamic, looking for ways to help everyone thrive.
So kids with A.D.H.D. need a short-term strategy that helps them function, he said, tied to a long-term plan to eventually give them the skills they need, because whatever they pursue in life, they will need those executive function skills.
Everyone should understand that though self-management skills are delayed, “that doesn’t mean kids have a free pass for life,” Dr. Bertin said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Seven thought experiments to make you question everything”

Thought experiments are among the most important tools in the intellectual toolbox.
Widely used in many disciplines, thought experiments allow for complex situations to be explored, questions to be raised, and complex ideas to be placed in an understandable context.
Here we have seven thought experiments in philosophy you might not have heard of.
Question: How can it choose? Does it choose at all, or does it stand still until it starves?
Question: If you are obligated to save the life of a child in need, is there a fundamental difference between saving a child in front of you and one on the other side of the world?
Question: Is the Swampman the same person as the disintegrated fellow?Davidson said no.
Question: Are you obligated to keep the musician alive, or do you cut him loose and let him die because you want to?
Thompson, who has several excellent thought experiments to her name, says no.

The orginal article.