Summary of “How a Chinatown-by-the-Sea Popped Up on the Jersey Shore”

Ng Shee went for a stroll in Bradley Beach, New Jersey.
“Two thousand dollars later, Lee B. Lok and family were ensconced in a summer bungalow of their very own in the village where twenty years before they would have been lucky to be able to rent some rooms over a store,” wrote Bruce Edward Hall in his Chinatown memoir Tea That Burns.
Lee’s lucky break paved the way for more Chinatown families.
Others bought along the same street, and soon, Newark Avenue became an equivalent to Mott Street in Manhattan; a mini, parallel Chinatown on the Jersey Shore.
While the Lees blazed the path of home ownership, the story of how Chinatown families started renting in Bradley goes much farther back.
The church owned a summer home named Cliff Villa in Bradley Beach, a tiny, mile-long town on the New Jersey shore.
Fresh Air families from Chinatown loved the experience so much-especially in the years before air conditioning-that they began to rent there on their own.
John Mok estimates that there are perhaps 15 to 20 families with roots in Chinatown who still own homes in Bradley Beach, a town just 11 by 7 blocks wide.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Buzziest Café in New York City, and the Teens Who Make It Go”

Such is the charm of Kopitiam, one of Eater’s “16 Best New Restaurants in America” and the first entry in Bon Appétit’s hundred recommended restaurants in New York.
It has the profile of a buzzy New York restaurant, but the backbone of a much humbler neighborhood mom-and-pop.
“Kopitiam in Malaysia is about the same thing-your family goes to the same place over decades.” The new space allowed Pang to re-create the shops she’d loved back home.
Bethany Li, then a staff attorney at the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, worked with Chinatown residents after the 2008 City Council resolution to develop an alternate zoning proposal to present to the city.
Kopitiam’s staffing sets it apart from similar restaurants nearby; it’s got the food-world acclaim of a more established, traditional restaurant, but it’s staffed like a mom-and-pop place, with high-school-aged kids working part-time after school.
This wasn’t the original plan; when Tsai started trying to hire a staff for the soon-to-open restaurant in the summer of 2018, she initially wanted to find the kind of staffers she was used to working with: experienced restaurant workers in their mid-to-late 20s. But Kopitiam was new and relatively unknown when she was hiring-a “Startup,” she calls it-and not many people with restaurant experience applied.
You can make good money busing tables or pulling espressos at a lot of places in New York; the kids working at Kopitiam seem to be getting more out of the job than just the money.
What Kopitiam proves is that there’s a new kind of restaurant Chinatown can support.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Towards Chinatown”

Two days after I learn that my mother has cancer, after my sister tearfully tells me over the phone, “This might be mom’s last Christmas,” I go to San Francisco Chinatown.
At home, my mother sings Cantonese songs from her childhood to me.
In Chinatown, my mother got her hair cut by a woman called Pony.
In the aftermath of the 1906 earthquake and fire, Chinatown merchants hired white architects to rebuild their buildings with pagodas, dragon motifs, and eaves curling skyward, a stage-set Chinatown to attract tourists and to protect the neighborhood against city leaders who had planned to seize its land.
I don’t know that in a Chinatown alley stands a modest building with my mother’s family name on it, home to our family association.
Am I imagining the yearning of my mother, left behind by her parents as a child as they headed towards America one by one? She was raised by a grandmother in a one-room apartment shared with an uncle who smoked indoors.
What do you pack when your mother has cancer and you don’t know how long you’ll stay? An acquaintance suggests sweats, but I only pack one pair.
I’m surprised – at how I mourn the loss of my mother tongue, but my mother does not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Many in Chinatown have never tried its most popular restaurant, so I brought the food to them”

Many in Chinatown have never tried its most popular restaurant, so I brought the food to them – Los Angeles Times.
Howlin’ Ray’s has come up in a lot of the interviews I’ve done with Chinatown locals since the restaurant opened in 2016, an object of bewilderment for some older residents and envy for business owners struggling to make rent.
What does it mean when Chinatown’s most popular restaurant is physically and financially out of reach for so many of its residents? How can we bring investment to neighborhoods that badly need it without placing their poorest people at risk?
Cheng, Tao, and Nguyen grew up coming to Chinatown on occasion with their parents for food and shopping.
Zone has heard the criticisms that his restaurant has helped gentrify Chinatown and says he responds by trying to be a part of the community in whatever way he can.
Then I walk over to Hill Street, where I meet King Cheung, a community activist and member of the Chinatown Community for Equitable Development organization, along with a group of seniors who have been curious about the food at Howlin’ Ray’s.
It all happens because we want to eat good food and get likes on our social media posts; because food writers need readers; because chefs rent the only places they can afford; because property owners and developers want to maximize their investments; because politicians want to spur economic development and get reelected.
I whip out my phone and show her how Burgerlords and the other newer Chinatown places had tens of thousands of followers; explain that other popular Instagram accounts help promote them; pull up the articles that food sites had written about them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America’s Chinatowns Are Disappearing”

For centuries, Chinatowns were neglected by outside investors.
As Baby Boomers and Millennials move back into center cities, Chinatowns are some cities’ hottest neighborhoods.
Sale prices in Boston’s Chinatown were among the fastest-growing in the city in 2017, increasing by $285,000; one of New York City’s biggest condo projects is a $1.4 billion, 815-unit tower in Chinatown that features a 75-foot swimming pool, an “Adult tree house,” and an outdoor tea pavilion.
According to an analysis by the website Zumper, rents for a one bedroom in the “Historic cultural” neighborhood of Los Angeles, which includes Chinatown, were $2,350 in June 2017-among the highest in Los Angeles, more than listings in popular neighborhoods such as West Hollywood and Silver Lake.
As investors set their sights on Chinatowns across America, longtime residents are being displaced.
A 2013 study completed by Leong and other scholars for the Asian American Legal Defense Fund found that from 1990 to 2010, Asians went from a majority to a minority of the residents of Chinatowns in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia.
Representatives from Chinatown Community for Equitable Development, a volunteer nonprofit in Los Angeles’s Chinatown that organizes residents, told me they’re working with tenants in 10 buildings in Chinatown to fight rent increases and proposed evictions.
Even in places with rent control, Chinese residents don’t feel empowered to speak up when their rights are violated, often because they don’t feel like they truly belong in the larger community, said Jan Lin, a professor of sociology at Occidental College who has studied Chinatowns in Los Angeles and New York.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In Vancouver, a Door to a Parallel Culinary World”

Mr. Watanabe, the executive chef, and Alain Chow, his sous-chef, never seemed to be forcing flavors to do things against their will.
These dishes were neither Japanese nor Italian but some third thing invented by Mr. Watanabe and Mr. Chow.The only small bumps of the night came with the pasta course.
Fried whole fish served, in the style of tempura, with soy sauce and grated daikon, has become one of Kissa Tanto’s signature dishes.
Mr. Watanabe, whose father’s side of the family is Japanese and whose mother’s side is Corsican, made his name around the corner from Kissa Tanto.
These places were gone by the time Bao Bei came along.
Chinatown’s streets were dark, and its many back alleys were full of people doing the things people always do in back alleys.
Bao Bei’s success, not to mention the crowds looking for somewhere to kill time while waiting for a table there, inspired a night-life revival in Chinatown.
One of the nicest things about Kissa Tanto is that it inhabits the neighborhood respectfully.

The orginal article.