Summary of “Welcome to Paris’s Delicious, Wine-Soaked, Never-Ending Block Party”

Similar joints exist across Paris, but what sets Savoir Vivre’s apart is that all four of its venues-Vivant, Déviant, Da Graziella, and Hôtel Bourbon-are owned by 30-year-old Arnaud Lacombe, who, by a mixture of luck and an intuitive sense of how young people like to party, did the opposite of what most restaurateurs do.
Arnaud’s food-and-libation kingdom is called Savoir Vivre, which literally translates to “Knowing how to live.” Though he didn’t plan to create one of the city’s most raucous nightlife destinations, Arnaud was determined to design an experience around something he thought was too hard to find in Paris: pure pleasure.
So Arnaud bought two sleepy restaurants on the same block and decided to do something drastically un-French: turn one of them, originally a Belle Époque bird shop, into a Neapolitan pizza joint.
Shortly thereafter, Arnaud met a hungry 23-year-old chef named Pierre Touitou, whom he installed in the cramped kitchen of the other restaurant, which he opened as Vivant in 2016.
As is a good all-night rager at Hôtel Bourbon, Arnaud’s third property, which inhabits the basement of the old Bronco space.
Since hosting its first party, in October 2017, Hôtel Bourbon has become a clubhouse for the French fashion elite and celebs like Kid Cudi and Emily Ratajkowski, but Guillaume and Arnaud make sure the 200 guests who make it past the velvet rope represent Paris’s socio-cultural flavor.
There you have the ultimate Paris party game plan, a road map for how to enjoy life in style.
Do any Parisians really spend a whole day on Rue des Petites Écuries, eating pizza Margherita at Da Graziella for lunch, having a glass of Vincent Charlot at Déviant, tucking into whatever Pierre is braising and torching for dinner at Vivant, and then hitting Hôtel Bourbon till the sun comes up? “A lot of friends do it almost every day,” says Arnaud.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s No Stopping Toronto’s ‘Uber-Raccoon'”

There’s No Stopping Toronto’s ‘Uber-Raccoon’ Toronto is known for its raccoons’ aggressive ability to get into garbage cans.
The raccoon scourge was bad enough that the city spent CA$31 million on “Raccoon-resistant” organic green-colored waste bins in 2016.
The Toronto Star recently published a 6,000-word investigation on the bin battle.
“It began in January when I got a message from a friend saying the new green bins have eliminated the raccoon population in Toronto,” says reporter Amy Dempsey, who broke the story.
Dempsey tells NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro on Weekend Edition that she reached out to animal behaviorist and raccoon expert Suzanne MacDonald, who had been hearing the same concerns from locals, worried about the possibility that the city’s “Very fat” raccoons would starve.
The bins, as Dempsey writes, feature “a rotating handle on the lid that connects to a disk on the inside, which, when the lid is shut, fastens into a made-in-Germany gravity lock.” You can open the bins by turning the circular latch, or by turning the bins upside-down to 110 degrees, “Which triggers the release of the gravity lock.” The gravity lock is there to let a robotic arm on garbage trucks open the bins.
“Then the raccoons got into the second bin and then the city came back and said, ‘Well, actually we think there might be something wrong with the second bin that you’ve had,'” Dempsey tells NPR. Dempsey captured the brazen success on video.
“One of the videos I captured, the raccoon just walks up to the bin, pulls it right down and it lands with a bang and then she turns and looks directly at the camera almost as if to say, ‘Huh, you can’t stop me. You can’t stop me.'”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can money develop a neighborhood?”

Can you build a neighborhood out of money? It’s a defining question in America’s fastest-growing cities.
We confront the lasting effects, both good and bad, of a massive sports complex on one of a city’s most diverse neighborhoods.
What all six cities have in common is a distinctly American problem: how we, the people, reconcile our desire for economic growth with neighborhoods that are equitable for all their constituents.
Now the city is asking: What will it take for Mid-Market to become the vibrant, food-filled neighborhood the city hoped for?
Mid-Market needs to find its heart in order to become a real neighborhood Curbed SF In San Francisco, a tech boom does not a restaurant boom make Eater SF LOS ANGELES A brand-new stadium-along with a performing arts venue, a conference center, and over 700,000 square feet of commercial and residential space-is slated to open in Inglewood in 2020.
How LA’s NFL stadium will seal the fate of Inglewood restaurants Eater LA Inglewood home values are soaring-blame the NFL stadium Curbed LA ATLANTA Atlanta’s erstwhile City Hall East has been reborn as Ponce City Market, a mixed-use complex featuring a food hall, cocktail bars, and office space-a shiny new hub in the longstanding Old Fourth Ward district that is now host to businesses like MailChimp and Google.
Hudson Yards wants to become NYC’s next great neighborhood Curbed NY The case against Hudson Yards dining Eater NY DETROIT A seemingly constant parade of boosters has invited developers and entrepreneurs to remake Detroit’s New Center district.
While restaurant owners acknowledge the area’s advantages-a newly completed rail system, proximity to one of the city’s fastest-growing residential neighborhoods-there have been some notable closures that make opening a restaurant in the area seem like a risky move.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘For me, this is paradise’: life in the Spanish city that banned cars”

With all but the most essential traffic banished, there are no revving engines or honking horns, no metallic snarl of motorbikes or the roar of people trying make themselves heard above the din – none of the usual soundtrack of a Spanish city.
“Before I became mayor 14,000 cars passed along this street every day. More cars passed through the city in a day than there are people living here.”
Miguel Anxo Fernández Lores has been mayor of the Galician city since 1999.
As cities around the world close central streets to cars to mark World Car-Free Day, Guardian Cities is looking at the joys and trials of urban walking.
Laura Laker casts a critical eye on the performance of Vision Zero, the global city scheme to eliminate traffic deaths.
Correspondent Stephen Burgen samples the newfound silence in the Spanish car-free city of Pontevedra, and Matthew Keegan discovers what prompted Hong Kong to reopen a popular pedestrian street to vehicles.
“There were a lot of drugs, it was full of cars – it was a marginal zone. It was a city in decline, polluted, and there were a lot of traffic accidents. It was stagnant. Most people who had a chance to leave did so. At first we thought of improving traffic conditions but couldn’t come up with a workable plan. Instead we decided to take back the public space for the residents and to do this we decided to get rid of cars.”
They stopped cars crossing the city and got rid of street parking, as people looking for a place to park is what causes the most congestion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s fascinating, the things you see when you’re out on foot”

In America it’s always faggot for some reason, which is odd, as shopping seems much gayer to me than walking along the road and I’m never singled out in stores, not even in ones that sell capes.
It’s fascinating, the things you see when you’re out on foot.
In Abu Dhabi we walked a promenade along the riverfront, marveling yet again at the sight of all these unintoxicated people.
I’ve walked through cities all over the world, and the worst, by far, is Bangkok.
So I’d walk around and around the block my hotel was on, and get asked every 10 seconds if I was looking for a woman.
As cities around the world close central streets to cars to mark World Car-Free Day, Guardian Cities is looking at the joys and trials of urban walking.
The US humourist and writer David Sedaris tells us about walking in cities from Raleigh to Reykjavik.
We’re eager to hear your thoughts and experiences of walking in cities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Burning Man’s Mathematical Underbelly”

First in 2008, and several times since, a fellow math PhD and I traveled to the Burning Man art festival to sit in the desert and talk with the locals about whatever they happened to be curious about.
Burning Man began in 1986, when a group of people decided to assemble annually on a San Francisco beach and burn a wooden human effigy.
In 1990, increasing membership and a lack of fire permits forced Burning Man to combine with Zone #4, a ”Dadaist temporary autonomous zone” piloted by the Cacophony Society, in the Black Rock Desert, 110 miles outside of Reno, Nevada.
At the mathematical origin is ”the Man,” the titular carry-through from Burning Man’s historical origins.
The demographic inside local Wal-Marts shifts precipitously in the days leading up to Burning Man as bikes, water, and food are stripped from the shelves.
Burning Man has a ”gift economy,” so once you’ve left Reno and entered Burning Man proper, money ceases to have worth.
The people attending Burning Man come from all over the world, with wildly divergent personal histories.
When a question about complex numbers comes up, you can get everybody onto the same page by talking about the complex plane in terms of the layout of Black Rock City: the Man is at zero, Center Camp is at i, the main entrance is around – 2i, the 3:00 and 9:00 plazas are at 1, and the Temple is at + i. And when all else fails, there are very few people at Burning Man who aren’t at least a little enthusiastic about open fires.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Struggling Dayton, Ohio, Reveals the Chasm Among”

The plight of small and mid-sized post-industrial cities like Dayton is hardly new, but it’s gotten obscured in recent years.
In 1980, even after the first wave of deindustrialization, Middle American cities such as Dayton were remarkably close to par with their coastal peers.
In the early decades of the last century, the city was home not only to the Wright brothers, but to lesser known inventors like Charles Kettering, who is credited with the electrical starting motor, among many automotive advances.
As a recent report by the Greater Ohio Policy Center found, Columbus, which was from its founding less reliant on manufacturing than other Ohio cities, has in recent years “Diverged dramatically” from other cities in the state on a whole range of economic measures, including population growth, poverty rates, labor force participation, and median income.
Cities like Dayton are also embracing job growth of a sort that not so long ago would have been considered beneath them.
For all the talk about the opioid epidemic leaving few places untouched, the fact is that it’s hit far harder in struggling cities than in winner-take-all ones.
Once the struggling cities become known as thriving markets for illegal opiates, they draw ever more addicts from nearby towns and suburbs, who avail themselves both of the drug supply and of local social services: shelters, soup kitchens, and drug treatment programs that aren’t available in the communities from which they’ve come.
It’s a dark inversion of the winner-take-all dynamic in prosperous cities: instead of drawing ever more wealthy professionals, the struggling cities draw ever more people in desperate straits.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Volkswagen Kills the Beetle, the Car That Conquered the City”

RIP Volkswagen Beetle, the car that conquered the city.
On a late-1970s road trip across New York state, my brother and I counted so many Volkswagen Beetles that we got tired of punching each other.
Yesterday, the German automaker announced that it would be killing the Beetle brand for the 2019 model year, news that surprised zero industry observers-these plans have been known for years-but still generated an involuntary spasm of nostalgia.
VW leaned in on the adorability idea-perhaps too hard-when it relaunched the Beetle.
The Bug, like the many other, even tinier city cars that emerged from Europe after World War II, may have been similarly austere, but its heart was light, its face was friendly and round, and it was made for a youthful and urban world.
Ford may have built the automobile age, but the Beetle conquered the city.
The new joys of urban transport are different, and cars like the Beetle can no longer deliver them.
Maybe it’ll have big happy eyes and a vase for a dashboard flower, to remind the children of former Bug owners that driving your own car around was once a joyful thing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Harvard study finds a better way to design bike lanes”

In a study newly published in the journal Cities and spotlighted in a podcast from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, I worked with colleagues from the University of São Paulo to learn whether pedestrians and bicyclists on five cycle tracks in the Boston area liked having trees, where they preferred the trees to be placed and whether they thought the trees provided any benefits.
The images included configurations such as a row of trees separating the cycle track from the street or trees in planters extending into the street between parked cars.
The most popular options were to have trees and bushes, or just trees, between the cycle track and the street.
Climate change is increasing stress on street trees, but better street design can help trees flourish.
Planting trees in continuous earth strips, instead of isolated wells in the sidewalk, would enable their roots to trade nutrients, improving the trees’ chances of reaching maturity and ability to cool the street.
A design could feature a sidewalk, then a cycle track, then street trees planted between the cycle track and the bus lane and in island bus stops.
The trees would reduce heat island effects from the expansive hardscape of the bus lane, and bus riders would have a better view.
More urban trees could lead to more tree limbs knocking down power lines during storms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Will Climate Change Affect Politics?”

In its march to slash water consumption drastically, this metropolis of 4 million people also became a harbinger of how water will constrain global cities in the future, and how climate change will bring turmoil and a new slate of challenges to places where class and racial divides are deep.
In a facility nestled between a memorial for the imperialist founding father Cecil Rhodes and a road named after Nelson Mandela, researchers at the university’s Future Water Institute consider how the water crisis has shaped the country and the city.
The Coalition asserted that “In fact, all tiers of Government is complicit through lack of foresight and mismanagement of our water resources.” Through a series of intense protests and heated confrontations with officials in the summer, members of the group stressed that a mobilization of citizens on the order of the old anti-apartheid movement would be required to create the political change necessary to secure the water future of the Western Cape and South Africa.
Top up 170 bottles, running an average kitchen faucet for 40 minutes, and you’ll come close to estimating just how much water the average American consumes every day.
Even if future rainfall patterns do manage by some unknown dynamic to stay similar to current levels, increased temperatures driven by anthropogenic climate change mean increased evaporation and baseline-higher water requirements for people, industry, and agriculture.
While each city has a very different set of reasons for its water woes, ranging from pollution to poor infrastructure to poor planning to desertification and drought, they all share a common challenge: Climate change will likely make the task of providing water harder, the populations thirstier, and the people angrier, even as many of the cities grow.
In a thesis on the dynamics of politics and political mobilization during São Paulo’s water crisis, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher Isadora Araujo Cruxên found that water-supply management was “a deeply political issue.” Just as the Coalition arose in Cape Town, the Alliance for Water and the Collective for Water Struggle emerged in São Paulo and its surrounding areas.
For these groups, the prospect of water shortages, along with an oppositional politics demanding water as a human right, proved to be the catalysts for coalition building-and a potentially dangerous platform for political movements in the future.

The orginal article.