Summary of “The Charity ‘No Lean Season’ Is Helping The Poor By Making It Easier For Them To Migrate”

The Charity ‘No Lean Season’ Is Helping The Poor By Making It Easier For Them To Migrate : Goats and Soda Most aid to people in poor places tries to improve conditions where they live.
Specifically, Mobarak wanted to see whether a little bit of aid could give people in rural areas enough of a cushion so they could try their luck in the city without risking catastrophic consequences if they didn’t find a job.
“About five times as cost-effective,” notes Mobarak.
Migrating as a group has a lot of benefits, notes Mobarak.
Perhaps the most gratifying result of his experiments, says Mobarak, is a finding that came “As a real surprise for me.”
Several funders have been so impressed with Mobarak’s work that they’ve partnered with him to scale up his idea into what is now a full-fledged charity called No Lean Season.
Mobarak’s results were exactly the kind of idea Evidence Action was looking for, says Karen Levy, a senior official.
Mobarak’s work has also contributed to what has been something of a mind shift among poverty researchers, says Michael Clemons with the Center for Global Development, a Washington D.C.-think tank.

The orginal article.

Summary of “San Francisco’s Skyline, Now Inescapably Transformed by Tech”

One commentator at the time exclaimed, “From the summit of every hill as one views the city it rivets the attention of the spectator, reminding him forcibly of the story of the giant holding an army of pygmies at bay.”
Next year, it will most likely surpass Wells Fargo as the largest private employer in the city.
San Francisco has always had conflicting feelings about growth and wealth.
“The mid-1960s and early 1970s in San Francisco simultaneously saw a downtown building boom and by far the nation’s strongest anti-skyscraper movement,” said Ms. Isenberg, author of “Designing San Francisco: Art, Land and Urban Renewal in the City by the Bay.” “They went hand in hand.”
An insurance company, Transamerica had deep roots in the city, but many residents thought its location on the edge of the Financial District, near Chinatown and North Beach, would overwhelm the neighborhood.
“Stop them from burying our city under a skyline of tombstones,” one ad urged, while another proclaimed: “New studies have shown that the more we build high-rise, the more expensive it becomes to live here.”
The Transamerica Pyramid was shaved down from 1,040 feet to 853 feet.
The Transamerica Pyramid remained the tallest in the city until this year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How DJ Premier Changed Hip-Hop”

In 1989, DJ Premier managed to get Charlie Parker, Big Daddy Kane, Brian Eno, and James Brown on the same record, without any lawyers – just by the virtue of having a good set of ears and a sampler that boasted “Extended memory.” “I saw [DJ] Marley [Marl] do an interview on the news while I was up here. They were talking about a ‘new phenomenon called hip-hop,'” Premier tells me.
Dismantling records into their components, Premier developed his signature sound from truncated bits of drums, piano, filtered bass lines, and scratched-in taunts and warnings, usually related to authenticity.
“Pretty much everything she told me not to take I took when I moved to New York,” in 1988, Premier says.
Those classic Premier beats that once bumped inside the heads and hallways of Biggie, Jay-Z, and Nas now inhabit the city organism, as if New York always sounded like the ’90s. There ought to be some neural Black Mirror geo-implant that Venmos Premier a royalty for whenever the sight of a bridge, a Big L mural, or winter itself slips one of his moods into our daily ops.
Though he was born in Texas, DJ Premier changed how we listen to New York City itself, through brief, happenstance encounters.
“I’m from the era that becomes the big trucks and jeeps. That added on to a whole new dimension. Putting the emphasis on the beats and the 808s [was] even more crazy,” Premier says.
Parts of the city are changing faster than an infant outsizing her Gang Starr onesie, now available on DJ Premier’s website, premierwuzhere.com.
“Your relevance is the people who supported you from the get-go. Everything I do is in a New York state of mind. I’m indebted to preserving the sound of the city,” Premier says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One Target in Beijing’s Migrant Crackdown: Schoolchildren”

“My Chinese dream is for my family to live a happy and healthy life, without having to worry about whether my children can attend school,” said Mr. Ding, whose family has been evicted from homes twice in the past month.
Their children end up attending privately run, low-cost schools that may be hobbled by poor teaching, insufficient funding and crumbling facilities.
In Beijing, a sprawling network of more than 100 privately run migrant schools serves hundreds of thousands of students for whom these are often the only option.
The Beijing government has shuttered dozens of migrant schools over the years.
“The children see demolitions all around them. We have to calm them down and tell them our school can survive.”
Many families have lived in Beijing for years and are reluctant to send their children back to rural areas that can lack modern schools and hospitals.
In Shaanxi, a northern province, hundreds of parents recently protested new rules making it tougher for migrant children to enroll in schools.
At Zhanbei Elementary in Fuzhou, a southern city, parents and educators have accused the government of abusing children by shutting off hot water and electricity in an effort to force the school to close.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Tech Expanded From Silicon Valley to Bubblegum Alley”

To date, more than 7,800 tech employees work in San Luis Obispo County, an increase of more than 20 percent in the last five years, according to the California Center for Jobs and the Economy.
Amazon leases two spaces downtown, and in October, Amazon Web Services announced a strategic partnership with Cal Poly.
Erected on the former campus softball field, the tech park will be expanded to include four more facilities over 10 years, said Jim Dunning, the director of economic development and technology transfer at Cal Poly.To encourage the entrepreneurial spirit, the university established the SLO HotHouse as a space for the community and students at the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
Since the center’s inception in 2010, Cal Poly students and graduates have started 75 companies and generated more than $150 million in venture capital funding, said Tod Nelson, the center’s executive director.
The SLO HotHouse has proved so energizing that when a building across the street that was once home to a bread bakery was up for lease, the university jumped at the chance to transform it into the Cal Poly Lofts, 32 apartments rented exclusively to the center’s students.
One firm, the 125-employee iFixit, wanted to stay close to Cal Poly to attract fresh talent, so it moved into a vacated car dealership and renovated the 17,000 square feet of space.
Allan Cooper, a former city planning commissioner and a founding member of the Save Our Downtown citizens’ coalition, said there was no doubt the tech community was growing.
Gary Dwyer, a former Cal Poly professor who taught urban design for more than 30 years, said the tech workers were using San Luis Obispo as a playground to surf and ride mountain bikes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The year is 2037. This is what happens when the hurricane hits Miami”

More than three hundred people died, many of them swept away by the surging waters that submerged much of Miami Beach and Fort Lauderdale; thirteen people were killed in traffic accidents as they scrambled to escape the city after the news spread-falsely, it turned out-that one of the nuclear reactors at Turkey Point, an aging power plant twenty-four miles south of Miami, had been destroyed by the surge and had sent a radioactive cloud floating over the city.
Before the storm hit, damage from rising seas had already pushed city and county budgets to the brink.
If you live on the coast, what matters more than the height the seas rise to is the rate at which they rise.
If we burn all the known reserves of coal, oil, and gas on the planet, seas will likely rise by more than two hundred feet in the coming centuries, submerging virtually every major coastal city in the world.
We do not live in a world where money is no object, and one of the hard truths about sea-level rise is that rich cities and nations can afford to build seawalls, upgrade sewage systems, and elevate critical infrastructure.
If no significant action is taken, global damages from sea-level rise could reach $100 trillion a year by 2100.
As the waters rise, millions of these people will be displaced, many of them in poor countries, creating generations of climate refugees that will make today’s Syrian war refugee crisis look like a high school drama production.
At what point will we take dramatic action to cut CO2 pollution? Will we spend billions on adaptive infrastructure to prepare cities for rising waters-or will we do nothing until it is too late? Will we welcome people who flee submerged coastlines and sinking islands-or will we imprison them?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Killing Net Neutrality Has Brought On a New Call for Public Broadband”

Today, around 185 communities in the United States offer some form of public broadband service.
Because these services are controlled by public entities, they are also accountable to the public – a perk that anybody who has tried to get a broadband company on the phone can appreciate.
The concept of Seattle having a municipal broadband network was debated during last year’s city council and mayoral elections.
“We didn’t rate with Comcast because we were a small market,” Ron Littlefield, Chattanooga’s mayor at that time, told Vice Motherboard, about why the city decided to take the step of offering a city-run broadband network to its residents.
The political peril in pursuing public broadband, noted David Segal, head of Demand Progress, which advocates for an open internet, comes with the potential of giving unwarranted credibility to the arguments made by FCC Chair Ajit Pai, that states, cities, and the Federal Trade Commission are best poised to regulated the situation.
That’s not at all the case, Segal argued, and public broadband is a good thing in itself, but shouldn’t be seen as a substitute for net neutrality.
It’s no surprise that the telecommunications industry has responded bitterly toward the success of Chattanooga and similar public broadband systems.
A number of states – with legislators backed by telecom giants like AT&T – moved to ban cities from establishing their own broadband networks with statewide preemption laws.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Waze and Google Maps Create Traffic in Cities”

In 2001, the city designated the street as Berkeley’s first “Bicycle boulevard,” presumably due to some combination of it being relatively free of traffic and its offer of a direct route from the UC Berkeley campus down into Oakland.
It’s not only annoying as hell, it’s a scenario ripe for accidents; among the top causes of accidents are driver distraction, unfamiliarity with the street, and an increase in overall traffic.
The two ride-sharing titans have each designed their own mapping apps – Lyft Navigation and Uber Driver – but Navigation was built using Google Maps, and Uber’s app has yet to be fully rolled out.
If cities thwart map apps and ride-share services through infrastructure changes with the intent to slow traffic down, it has the effect of slowing down traffic.
The algorithm may tell drivers to go down another side street, and the residents who’ve been griping to the mayor may be pleased, but traffic, on the city whole, has been negatively affected, making everyone’s travel longer than before.
If a grocery chain wants to build a supermarket, the city calculates how much extra traffic is expected, and imposes an “Impact fee” for the strain caused by the extra traffic on public thoroughfares.
In the odd case of map apps and ride-shares, who gets the fee? The “Disruptive” apps? The ride-share services physically clogging the streets? The users, the state, the cities themselves? Are a bunch of class-action lawsuits – like the one directed at Waze from an Israeli suburb – the future?
“If you make an app where some of the users’ travel time is 20 percent higher than it was before, to improve overall traffic by diverting flow, for the greater good of society,” says Bayen, “The first thing you’d do is delete it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10 Best Films of 2017”

Columbus Any number of well-made, stylish indie movies can be full of gorgeous frames and scenic photography, and an even greater number of those movies can tell stirring stories of youth and self-discovery.
Get Out is a movie we’ll undoubtedly remember for being a surprise phenomenon, and rightly so.
Baker has one of the most sympathetic eyes working in American movies today, and this gloriously widescreen movie, which feels thoroughly steeped in a sense of community above all, is his richest to date.
The real story of Hittman’s movie, and the reason it stands out from Call Me by Your Name and other good movies of its stripe, is one of images.
The Lost City of Z I love jungle adventures, melodrama, and grandiose intellectual and spiritual revelations-so of course I love movies, and of course I especially love The Lost City of Z, James Gray’s rip-roaring account of real-life explorer Percy Fawcett’s professional obsession with uncovering the secrets of the Amazon.
Good Time, directed by brothers Josh and Benny Safdie and starring Benny alongside Robert Pattinson, is the movie 2017 deserves.
As cinema, it’s a smooth gloss on the gritty crime movies of yore, embodying everything that’s good about the ongoing nostalgia trip currently afflicting movies and TV while falling prey to none of the usual bad habits.
The movie tells the history of Dawson City, an old gold rush town in the Yukon territory of Canada, where, in 1978, 533 silent films dating back to the 1910s and ’20s were discovered to have been buried in the snow for decades.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Great American Single-Family Home Problem”

The neighborhood has a number of single-family homes, and the street is quiet and quasi-suburban, but there are also apartment buildings and backyard cottages that nod to the city’s denser core.
A little under three years ago, a contractor named Christian Szilagy bought the property and presented the city with a proposal to demolish the house and replace it with three skinny and rectangular homes that would extend through the lot.
A mediator joined him and later filed a three-sentence report to the city: “The applicant described the project. Not a single neighbor had anything positive to say about it. No further meetings were scheduled.”
As neighbors wrote letters, called the city and showed up at meetings holding signs that said “Protect Our Community” and “Reject 1310 Haskell Permit!,” the project quickly became politicized.
The act is rarely invoked because developers don’t want to sue cities for fear it will anger city councils and make it harder for them to gain approval for other developments.
Shortly after Berkeley denied the Haskell Street permit, Ms. Trauss sued the city – and won.
Mr. Hanlon’s first project was to push for a law that would make it easier to sue cities under the Housing Accountability Act.
In addition to raising the legal burden of proof for cities to deny new housing projects, the bill makes the suits more expensive to defend by requiring cities that lose to pay the other side’s lawyers’ fees.

The orginal article.