Summary of “How to Make Friends in a New City”

Whether you’ve been promoted, taken a new job, or just needed to make a change – moving to a new city can be a scary endeavor.
For working adults, making new friends can be tough.
By teaching ourselves to understand how networks function, most of us can build, at least, a basic new network much faster than we built our old one.
You may find that you already know someone who lives in your new city.
This one may sound obvious, but many of us only reach out to our closest friends when we need help making new connections.
Take the time to ask many friends and colleagues if they know anyone worth meeting in your new city.
Once you land in your new city, it may be tempting to seek out meetups, networking events, and the like.
These are just a few steps you can take to build a network in your new city, and they’re certainly not the only thing you’ll be doing when you land.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Do You Build a Healthy City? Copenhagen Reveals Its Secrets”

Copenhagen consistently sits at the very top of the UN’s happiness index and is one of the star performers in the Healthy Cities initiative of the World Health Organisation, which, almost unknown and unsung, celebrates its 30th anniversary this year.
Copenhagen is a model for how healthy cities might be created across the world.
Copenhagen has “a very, very good health policy” to last 10 years, side-stepping the vicissitudes of political life, says Katrine Schj√łnning, the city’s head of public health.
Promoting health in everyday life is the first, says the city’s plan, “By making it attractive to cycle, by serving nutritious lunches in our institutions or by enabling educational institutions to offer quit-smoking programmes. Healthy thriving people are more likely to complete an education and find employment. In other words, health enables us to live the life we want.”
An extraordinary 62% of people living in the city cycle to work every day and the vast majority keep it up through cold and wet weather.
“Copenhagen is not a great city in terms of monuments or attractions, but I think it’s a great city in terms of convenience, and it is a people-centred city.”
It is developing a city where it is harder not to be healthy and environmentally friendly, with reduced air pollution thanks to initiatives such as the “Green roofs”.
“We have many people who suffer from stress and depression and anxiety,” says Sisse Marie Welling, the 31-year-old mayor for health and older people, when we meet in City Hall, its imposing rooms and staircases familiar from the TV series The Killing and Borgen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After son’s death, Chiefs’ Andy Reid finds success through second chances”

“If we have to do that, then we’re not being very efficient,” Holmgren told them probably a dozen times or more, but when Andy Reid walked into his office at 5 a.m. and found Jon Gruden already there, he started coming in at 4.
Marty Mornhinweg, Reid’s longtime assistant, used to walk past his boss’s office at all hours and see Reid still at his desk.
The years kept passing, and though Philadelphia made the playoffs five straight years and reached the Super Bowl after the 2004 season, Reid kept watching other coaches – sometimes his peers and former proteges – win it all: Gruden with Tampa Bay, John Harbaugh in Baltimore, eventually Doug Pederson in Reid’s old job.
In 2007, his two eldest sons – Andy and Tammy Reid had five children – were arrested six hours apart: Garrett on drug charges, Britt for pointing a gun at someone and having drugs in his car.
Dungy had been mentoring the former quarterback through his release in May 2009, and Reid had an idea.
Y Reid is in an office now, discussing the possibility that Kansas City has reached this point not because of what Reid has done but because of what he has not.
It’s why he’s still far more “Coach” than “Grandpa,” why he designs and calls Kansas City’s offensive plays, why – though he might well be as detached as he’s ever been – Andy Reid can’t go home.
“Two more,” Reid said, holding up his fingers, and that’s how many wins coach and franchise need to lift the Lombardi Trophy, the ultimate way to validate that meeting years ago in Philadelphia – and, as much as possible, erase what came before it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How an emerging African megacity cut commutes by two hours a day”

Guardian Cities is exploring these newcomers at a crucial period in their development: from car-centric Tehran to the harsh inequalities of Luanda; from the film industry of Hyderabad to the demolition of historic buildings in Ho Chi Minh City.
In 2018, four out of five of its people live in single-storey informal settlements on the sprawling fringes, where the journey to and from the centre regularly takes over two hours.
Dar es Salaam’s reliance on four arterial roads – two lanes each way for the most part, one lane in places – is a legacy of the colonial government that planned the city at the start of the 20th century for a population of 35,000.
For millions of people in African cities, this is their best hope of ever being connected.
“Bus rapid transit allows existing stakeholders to get involved. That’s what we did in Dar es Salaam and what we’re planning in Nairobi, where the bus bodies will be built in the city and local operators will look after tickets, fare collection and IT. It’s good for the development of the local economy.”
So why are these cities choosing the metro over the bus? Karol Zemek, the editor of Metro Report International, says trains can carry far more passengers than buses, have higher speeds, reduce emissions – and deliver a status boost buses cannot match.
“If you want to carry large numbers of people you cannot beat it, and moving large numbers of people around the city is crucial for economic growth.”
“It can be tempting for those in power, but is it really addressing the needs of people of the city? Bus rapid transit has been transformational for Dar es Salaam. For millions of people in African cities, this is their best hope of ever being connected.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Machine Learning Found Flint’s Lead Pipes”

McDaniel set out to replace 600 lead pipes each in 10 small zones.
Even as the crews began to do hundreds of digs, they were looking for lead pipes, which meant that they were creating a decidedly unrepresentative sample of the city.
So the University of Michigan team asked Fast Start to check lines across the city using a cheaper system called “Hydrovacing,” which uses jets of water, instead of a backhoe, to expose pipes.
As they refined their work, they found that the three most significant determinants of the likelihood of having lead pipes were the age, value, and location of a home.
More important, their model became highly accurate at predicting where lead was most likely to be found, and through 2017, the contractors’ hit rate in finding lead pipes increased.
After the nature of the pipes was determined, it would go out and replace the lead and galvanized-steel pipes.
Bincsik extolled the virtues of hydrovacing: It was cheaper and faster, less intrusive, and created a lower risk of damaging pipes.
Digging up the pipes in a traditional way cost several times more, according to contractor invoices from the 2017 phase of the project-at least $2,500, and as much as $5,000 depending on the type of pipes dug up and replaced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chicago’s Deep Tunnel: Is it the solution to urban flooding or a cautionary tale?”

There were more than 181,000 flood-insurance claims in Chicago between 2007 and 2011 amounting to $773 million in damage, according to a 2014 report by the Center for Neighborhood Technology, a Chicago think tank.
What happens in Chicago is paradigmatic urban flooding: There is no correlation between FEMA flood plains and flooding damage.
In 1900, engineers reversed the flow of the Chicago River to protect the city’s drinking water, shifting its fetid contents from the Great Lakes to the Mississippi, enraging the city of St. Louis and, years later, making Chicago the single-largest contributor to the “Dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico.
In 1978, Illinois Republican Sen. Charles Percy, looking back at decades’ worth of damage, declared Chicago the site of “The worst urban flooding known to any major city in America”-structural damage in neighborhoods, plus sewage in the river and the lake to the tune of 200 million solid pounds each year.
The case against the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan is that, well, Chicago still floods.
The congested network of neighborhood sewers in Chicago and its suburbs-local roads leading to the Deep Tunnel highway-also remain an unresolved issue.
In many storms, says Aaron Koch, who served as chief resilience officer for the city and now works as the Chicago director of the Trust for Public Land, the Deep Tunnel is helpless to empty undersized sewers battling against supersize storms and sprawl.
What if Chicago took a wrong turn in 1972 when, in the spirit of civic grandee Daniel Burnham, it opted to build the world’s largest sewers instead of making all possible efforts to keep rainwater out of them? Scott Bernstein, the founder of the Center for Neighborhood Technology, says that the Deep Tunnel imposed a massive opportunity cost because the city and the district did little else to adapt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Single Cell Hints at a Solution to the Biggest Problem in Computer Science”

One of the oldest problems in computer science was just solved by a single cell.
A group of researchers from Tokyo’s Keio University set out to use an amoeba to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem, a famous problem in computer science.
The problem works like this: imagine you’re a traveling salesman flying from city to city selling your wares.
This makes the traveling salesman problem one of a broad class of problems computer scientists call ‘NP hard.
‘ These are problems that get exponentially difficult very quickly, which also includes problems related to hacking encrypted systems and cryptocurrency mining.
The Keio University researchers used this efficiency to build a device to solve the traveling salesman problem.
This might seem like a roundabout way of calculating the solution to the traveling salesman problem, but the advantage is that the amoeba doesn’t have to calculate every individual path like most computer algorithms do.
So the amoeba can solve an NP-hard problem faster than any of our computer algorithms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “China is racing ahead in 5G. Here’s what that means.”

Last fall, the Fangshan government and China Mobile, the country’s largest mobile operator, outfitted a 6-mile road with 5G cell towers.
In its 13th Five-Year Plan the government describes 5G as a “Strategic emerging industry” and “New area of growth,” and in its Made in China 2025 plan, which outlines its goal of becoming a global manufacturing leader, it vows to “Make breakthroughs in fifth-generation mobile communication.”
China sees 5G as its first chance to lead wireless technology development on a global scale.
In a TV interview, Jianzhou Wang, the former chairman of China Mobile, China’s largest mobile operator, described the development of China’s mobile communication industry from 1G to 5G as “a process of from nothing to something, from small to big, and from weak to strong.”
China Mobile claims that its tests alone represent the world’s largest 5G trial network.
China wants to use 5G in smart cities and connected cars-for starters.
Early access to robust 5G networks could give China an edge in developing and monetizing services that use them-just as Silicon Valley profited from apps like Instagram, Uber, and YouTube after 4G LTE networks launched.
If you think a country needs to roll out 5G to all its major cities in order to claim leadership, China looks likely to come out ahead. China Tower, a company that builds infrastructure for the country’s mobile operators, has said it can cover China with 5G within three years of the government’s allocation of spectrum.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Geography of Startups and Innovation Is Changing”

We’re used to thinking of high-tech innovation and startups as generated and clustered predominantly in fertile U.S. ecosystems, such as Silicon Valley, Seattle, and New York.
As with so many aspects of American economic ingenuity, high-tech startups have now truly gone global.
The past decade or so has seen the dramatic growth of startup ecosystems around the world, from Shanghai and Beijing, to Mumbai and Bangalore, to London, Berlin, Stockholm, Toronto and Tel Aviv.
A number of U.S. cities continue to dominate the global landscape, including the San Francisco Bay Area, New York, Boston, and Los Angeles, but the rest of the world is gaining ground rapidly.
That was the main takeaway from our recent report, Rise of the Global Startup City, which documents the global state of startups and venture capital.
When we analyzed more than 100,000 venture deals across 300-plus global metro areas spanning 60 countries and covering the years 2005 to 2017, we discovered four transformative shifts in startups and venture capital: a Great Expansion, Globalization, Urbanization, and a Winner-Take-All Pattern.
These major transformations pose significant implications for entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, workers, and managers, as well as policymakers for nations and cities across the globe.
Globalization of high-tech entrepreneurship and venture capital mean greater competition across the board.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is How People Can Actually Afford to Live in Seattle”

Since 2010, Seattle has increased in population size by a whopping 18.7 percent, the fastest rate of growth among the biggest 50 cities in the United States.
For perspective, the Seattle Times noted that the city’s population growth of 114,000 in the first seven years of this decade was roughly the same amount it grew in the previous 30 years, back to 1980.
Among the 50 largest US cities, Seattle was one of just three so skewed toward the top, alongside San Francisco, the metropolis with which it is so often compared.
In May, the Seattle City Council passed a new tax on large businesses that it hoped would raise $47 million to fund affordable housing development and homelessness services, only to reverse course and repeal the plan a few weeks later under pressure from the local business community.
Per the National Low Income Housing Coalition, at minimum wage-currently a sliding scale from $11.50 to 15.45, based on size of employer and benefits-you’d have to earn $61,160 in order to afford what it described as a modest one-bedroom at Fair Market Rent in Seattle.
West Seattle and Columbia City were known until recently as havens for cheap rent, thanks to the relative inconvenience of getting downtown, but even those neighborhoods are starting to change.
Minimum Wage: Emily Fisher, who moved to Seattle from her hometown in Montana eight years ago, lives in the Magnolia neighborhood tucked away in the city’s northwest.
So how do people actually afford to live in Seattle? The lazy answer is to land a lucrative tech job.

The orginal article.